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tristan

afb bonfire

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Way back in the day the common practice was to just dig a hole and burn the hive on site. This has not been a common practice for over 30 years for lots of reasons including forestry, fire bans and the fact that most farmers aren't keen on fires . You have to have permission to store AFB until it can be burnt but it is not hard to obtain. When killing hives with petrol be very careful not to use too much as the petrol will dissolve wax and that allows the honey to run out which can cause a real AFB threat. Hives and long-term storage can also attract wax moth and flies which also pose some disease risk. If I have to store an AFB I place it onto heavy duty plastic which I fold up around the hive and seal on the top so that no honey can leak out. A properly built high-temperature incinerator for each area would I believe be a worthwhile investment and would go some way to mitigating the filthy smoke from plastic frames.

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i forgot to mention to other obvious problem of storage is that people do it poorly and it gets robbed.

a lot of beginners simply do not understand the seriousness of the situation. (and some experienced beeks as well!)

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Only a moron would burn a hive right now

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On 14/02/2019 at 8:26 AM, cBank said:

 The local fire brigade came out and there was much gnashing of teeth due to the fire ban. MPI and fire brigade rowing etc.

The DECA course made it very clear to me that the need to burn overrules fireban rules

 

when i did my deca they daid if there is a total fire ban adhear to it. after the hive is dead wrap it in pallet wrap very well all over it. then burn when you can

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58 minutes ago, john berry said:

 You have to have permission to store AFB until it can be burnt but it is not hard to obtain.

sounds like a case of the authorities left hand can talk to the right. - burn in a total fire ban. ummmm

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Thought i'd throw this pic in for interest, a few years back when i had a big outbreak, 11 hives in there, 3 and 4 deckers. Pretty heartbreaking.

 

 

AFB burn.jpg

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17 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Thought i'd throw this pic in for interest, a few years back when i had a big outbreak, 11 hives in there, 3 and 4 deckers. Pretty heartbreaking.

 

 

AFB burn.jpg

 

Kudos

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2 hours ago, tristan said:

while they can, its an awfully big risk.

stored afb gear is a risky situation especially if dealing with beginners. its a lot better if they just find a more suitable location to burn them.

 

i've mentioned on here about a guy who started up over the fence from one of our sites. he lost his hives to afb (we lost about half of ours). his hives all seamed to disappear, but few years later he sells all his boxes, but no bases and lids. ie brood box, bases and lids went in the fire, the supers got extracted then sat in the shed, then got sold.

thats one of the issues with storage, it gets forgotten etc, or the need for cash arises......

 

imho this is one of the big issues going forward with the steam going out of the industry.  as crowds short cut to stay afloat or people bail and try to recoup as much as they can out of it.

What was that song

”who let the dogs out”😇

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I know of beekeepers who harvest the honey from AFB hives and store it till the last run of the extraction shed then put it through and burn the boxes.

 

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Yes, that practise is more common than you may think.

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1 hour ago, frazzledfozzle said:

I know of beekeepers who harvest the honey from AFB hives and store it till the last run of the extraction shed then put it through and burn the boxes.

 

no need to store it until the last extraction run, only needs to be kept sealed until the last run of the day, then the machines can get washed down after it goes through.

 

same with sites where they want the boxes kept separate so they can go back onto that site. clearly mark them and notify the extractor so they know.

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1 minute ago, tristan said:

, then the machines can get washed down after it goes through.

So gazillions of spores end up out in the yard with the washdown ?  Doesn't sound legal to me

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8 minutes ago, tristan said:

no need to store it until the last extraction run, only needs to be kept sealed until the last run of the day, then the machines can get washed down after it goes through.

 

 

Doesnt make sense to me I sure wouldn’t do it and I wouldn’t like to be the next customer through that plant either .

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12 minutes ago, tristan said:

no need to store it until the last extraction run, only needs to be kept sealed until the last run of the day, then the machines can get washed down after it goes through.

 

same with sites where they want the boxes kept separate so they can go back onto that site. clearly mark them and notify the extractor so they know.

But it is illegal. If anyone  turned up at my extraction shed with afb honey to be extracted they would be told to ###### off and not come back.

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On 14/02/2019 at 6:48 AM, Josh said:

I’m certain there would be consumer protection, but obviously hard to sort out now that it, justifiably, all smoke & ashes

Consumer protection is only available to end users. So a hobbiest would be entitled to claim it but a commercial not. Bit bs really. If it's not fit for purpose or a true to label issue it shouldn't matter who the buyer is... but our government ( of the time)in all its wisdom decided businesses can carry that loss. 

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2 hours ago, yesbut said:

So gazillions of spores end up out in the yard with the washdown ? 

down the drain and very very diluted. very very small risk.

 

2 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

Doesnt make sense to me I sure wouldn’t do it and I wouldn’t like to be the next customer through that plant either .

IF its cleaned its not an issue.

 

1 hour ago, Jamo said:

But it is illegal. If anyone  turned up at my extraction shed with afb honey to be extracted they would be told to ###### off and not come back.

then they don't tell you about it and you or someone else will pay the price for that.

far better they actually tell you so you can deal with it.

 

this is one of the other issues with AFB, people overreacting and end up making the situation even worse. ie you find a few afb hives, deal with it properly but you get labeled a bad beekeeper and blamed for all of the afb in the aera. there is a few cases of that reported in the beekeeper mag where a beek was blamed for AFB yet they found none in his hives.

 

keep in mind most beeks won't bother putting through one hives worth of supers. a few supers out of thousands is no big deal, quicker and easier to just chuck it on the fire than it is to muck around storing it and processing it.

the more common situation is processing an entire site where they have had afb problems. while afb may not be showing symptoms, they know darn well there will be afb somewhere in the gear and they want it all kept separate. 

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On 14/02/2019 at 10:25 AM, nikki watts said:

The law states it must be burned in 7 days. 

Would need a law change. 

The management agency allow secure storage in this instance but you need to request it and provide a plan of your intentions and precautions etc.

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Separate extraction for honey from a site with a AFB history is sensible and legal but extracting honey from any hive with any clinical symptoms i.e. one or more infected cells is absolutely illegal. I am hopeful that within a few years all honey will be tested for AFB so that those with an AFB problem can be found and helped.

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