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Commodity Levy / Fight for the Industrys future?

RISK OF CLOSURE

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15 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

APINZ looked at many types of levy design and chose what we settled on

Exactly why was a fixed sum per kg settled on instead of a percentage ? Was it because you knew the likely size of a crop vs the unknown value of a crop, which then enabled you to devise a budget ?

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1 minute ago, yesbut said:

Exactly why was a fixed sum per kg settled on instead of a percentage ? Was it because you knew the likely size of a crop vs the unknown value of a crop, which then enabled you to devise a budget ?

No, its the simplest model,

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Just now, Dennis Crowley said:

No, its the simplest model,

But most would argue the most inequitable

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, yesbut said:

But most would argue the most inequitable

No perfect system, but all redundant for now.

Edited by Dennis Crowley

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

No perfect system, but all redundant for now.

A percentage of crop sold could be easily gathered if honesty and integrity prevailed in the industry. Once a year Apinz (or whoever) could send out a "honey return"in the same way as tax returns , and pay their dues.   

above should read and beeks pay their dues

Edited by yesbut

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22 hours ago, Kiwi Bee said:

I know that @Dennis Crowley. From my understanding they did not want to sign off the per cent version of the levy.

Also it seems that ApiNZ did not fight(or not enough) for the per cent version.

I wonder where you gained that understanding @Kiwi Bee?

I think quite a few of us had gained that understanding.

Was it from a APINZ forum post? I seem to recall one that explained that the Minister would not support a percentage type basis.

 

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14 minutes ago, Ali said:

Was it from a APINZ forum post? I seem to recall one that explained that the Minister would not support a percentage type basis.

That’s the message I got as well 

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I wonder why that would be? To time complicated to administer? It is certainly fairer given the the vast difference in honey prices. 

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I wonder at the possiblity of the Minister being influenced by some in regard the style of levy and in fact I wonder in regard the relationship between MPI, the Minister and influencers with attachments to APINZ.

In my mind the whole APINZ levy raising issue was strongly motivated by building an entity of larger financial and political power seemingly strongly influenced by persons with a desire for a large share of the monies rightly or wrongly (the research lobby).

Others I am sure would have had more altruistic intentions (industry good in a real sense) while others I am sure would have seen job security and increased earnings accordingly in a more financially sound entity.

A slightly jaundiced view perhaps but........the timing of the new AFB Managment Agency money raising matter was seemingly exquisitely timed in relation to the failure of the Honey Levy money raising gambit.

The Management Agency is of course APINZ is it not?

How much of this is about the entity that is APINZ and it's growth/viability? 

Is there too much cross pollination between AFB.org and APINZ? I suspect so.

 

Anyway it is water under the bridge until the next gambit that is raised.

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On 15/03/2019 at 8:44 PM, flash4cash said:

 

Well in the goat industry after the 2nd major bust was simplify who is left standing. 

 

They then spent 5 years or so milking goats for nothing, freezing the milk and driving it to the airport so it could be sent to Ozzy to go into infant formula trails. So it sorts out thouse that are committed to the game, money or nothing. 

 

I suspect honey industry is about to experience a similar outcome.  With the right leadership nz honey could come back strong if they are smart.  Most of us however will not be here. 

Let me just say the bees are fun but not everything in life.  Family, friends and your health are far more important.  There is respect to anyone whom decided to move on.  

I have been putting a lot of thought into how we move on into the future. And in the quite still of the dawn it all becomes very simple. If only a limited amount of honey has moved out of the shed by the end of June, then we need to move on. There is no future in producing honey at low cost.  I am quite prepared to walk away from the bees come August. The honey boxes and duds get melted out and wax sold. The hives that made it through the winter sold , given away, or just not worried about. 

Thankfully we have'nt invested huge sums of money in state of the art honey equipment. The trucks and cranes will be usefull units to someone who needs to lift stuff.

Such is life. Once the decision is made , the rest is easy.

 

27 minutes ago, jamesc said:

I have been putting a lot of thought into how we move on into the future. And in the quite still of the dawn it all becomes very simple. If only a limited amount of honey has moved out of the shed by the end of June, then we need to move on. There is no future in producing honey at low cost.  I am quite prepared to walk away from the bees come August. The honey boxes and duds get melted out and wax sold. The hives that made it through the winter sold , given away, or just not worried about. 

Thankfully we have'nt invested huge sums of money in state of the art honey equipment. The trucks and cranes will be usefull units to someone who needs to lift stuff.

Such is life. Once the decision is made , the rest is easy.

 

No need to be glum ..... it's gonna free up a whole heap of time and actually get a life rather than be an unpaid  slave !

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50 minutes ago, jamesc said:

I have been putting a lot of thought into how we move on into the future. And in the quite still of the dawn it all becomes very simple. If only a limited amount of honey has moved out of the shed by the end of June, then we need to move on. There is no future in producing honey at low cost.  I am quite prepared to walk away from the bees come August. The honey boxes and duds get melted out and wax sold. The hives that made it through the winter sold , given away, or just not worried about. 

Thankfully we have'nt invested huge sums of money in state of the art honey equipment. The trucks and cranes will be usefull units to someone who needs to lift stuff.

Such is life. Once the decision is made , the rest is easy.

agree!~!!!

 

i know i will be looking at the cost of spraying 150h of solid manuka.  all i know is that even a bad year lamb is still called lamb....  anyone that thinks that's sad dosnt  pay f all rates.... 

by the way we are 25 pages in and the topic is still being actively monitored. has to be a record 

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41 minutes ago, nab said:

by the way we are 25 pages in and the topic is still being actively monitored. has to be a record 

Monitoring is not likely to go away either.  It is keeping the discussion civil.  But we can lock it, if that is what you want.

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2 hours ago, nab said:

agree!~!!!

 

i know i will be looking at the cost of spraying 150h of solid manuka.  all i know is that even a bad year lamb is still called lamb....  anyone that thinks that's sad dosnt  pay f all rates.... 

by the way we are 25 pages in and the topic is still being actively monitored. has to be a record 

Are you jocking about spraying the manuka ?

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I would not think so

 

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Might not need to spray the manuka @Nab.

The way myrtle rust is gathering steam, it will  wipeout the manuka for you.

 

Attended last week's MR stakeholders meeting and NZ  has to do alot to slow its spread.

  • Australia  has had  two myrtacae species go extinct and a third is on its way due to this fungus.
  • Australia has identified 350 susceptible species, NZ has identified 28 species.
  • No family of NZ manuka has shown 100% resistance to myrtle rust in Australian based testing.
  • It appears well established in the South Island, in forest south of Farewell Spit. Main species being affected is Ramarama.
  • NZ  has not invested in any research into Botany especially our native species in recent years. There is still  very little known about native plant phenology versus MR life cycle. Here we are extracting manuka honey with very little scientific knowledge about the very ecosystem we are working in.
  • It is showing the classic biosecurity incursion growth curve for NZ. Showing up in spread areas and increasing it's presence.  
  • It is going to take a number of research teams working on many facets of this disease to find a solution to protect our unique position plus a lot of money and time.
  • Want to know more then start living on this website - http://www.myrtlerust.org.nz/

And if you see something suspicous, photo it and send it to INaturalist - https://inaturalist.nz/

 

Life is tough and maybe tougher for many beekeepers. So I am not surprised to hear some folk will bail out of this industry.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

@Don Mac has their been any observed damage to Manuka that has been infected with myrtle rust ?

what about rata, pohutakawa ?

Edited by frazzledfozzle

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Posted (edited)
28 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

@Don Mac has their been any observed damage to Manuka that has been infected with myrtle rust ?

what about rata, pohutakawa ?

 Do not be surprised to learn Frazzled that there is no systematic surveying or monitoring programme under way for myrtle rust in NZ. This may well change over the coming months. 

From my data base, which is not systematic, just collecting information;

Ramarama has been the most susceptible species.

Pohutukawa has been infected with confirmed myrtle rust. Some of the first sites in the Bay of Plenty and in Northland were infected pohutukawa.

The first Manuka infection was identified in a nursery in Taranaki. Plant & Food have been running a large programme in Australia in exposing manuka families (there is no genotyping of strains of manuka yet) to MR over the past 12 months. They have measuring the resistance to MR for both stem and leaf infections - note it also infects flowers. The Australia strain of MR is the same we have in NZ.

Rata - I have no reports on Rata to date.

Suggest you look at the observations on I Naturalist - note there are few observers. 

https://inaturalist.nz/observations?place_id=6803&taxon_id=549208

Learn how to identify MR with this on line course - http://myrtlerust.org.nz/

 

A big problem is lack of interest by NZers. In January Manaaki Whenua reported 100 queries about MR, only got 9 in February.

The problem is growing but the interest of NZers in what is happening is declining. Perhaps they realise it will not go away!

Some beekeeper funding would have been very helpful to bring to the table - but that is not going to happen.

 

Edited by Don Mac
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4 hours ago, Don Mac said:

 

Some beekeeper funding would have been very helpful to bring to the table - but that is not going to happen.

 

Id imagine there would be landowners out there that would be interested, we have a few landowners very involved in the honey we produce from their Manuka and some are very active in ensuring maximum farm income with big focus on the honey/Manuka.

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4 hours ago, Stoney said:

Id imagine there would be landowners out there that would be interested, we have a few landowners very involved in the honey we produce from their Manuka and some are very active in ensuring maximum farm income with big focus on the honey/Manuka.

I agree Stoney. All stakeholders will wish to be involved.

My concern is that many may not know the seriousness of threat myrtle rust presents to the myrtacae species. 

No country has eradicated myrtle rust.

It has economically wiped out significant species around the world until they have found short term solutions.

This is not scare mongering it is a fact.

Smart land managers maximising farm income will want to consider all strengths, weaknesses and threats to their new investments.

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I live in the forest south of farewell spit .

I have seen no sign of myrtle rust .

It may be common in rama rama but rama rama is uncommon in the forest here .

 

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12 hours ago, kaihoka said:

I live in the forest south of farewell spit .

I have seen no sign of myrtle rust .

It may be common in rama rama but rama rama is uncommon in the forest here .

 

Kaihoka.

It was not ramarama, it was NZ Myrtle, Rohutu Lophomyrtus obcordata    http://nzpcn.org.nz/flora_details.aspx?ID=943

Note it is now identified as a threatened species. 

The observation is most recent, 9th March and 10 to 25 infected plants were noted.

https://inaturalist.nz/observations/21107914

The observer was well qualified to make the observation - Alex Fergus His job;

Ecology technician (field botanist mostly) at Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research, 

 

Is this site near you?

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1 hour ago, Don Mac said:

Kaihoka.

It was not ramarama, it was NZ Myrtle, Rohutu Lophomyrtus obcordata    http://nzpcn.org.nz/flora_details.aspx?ID=943

Note it is now identified as a threatened species. 

The observation is most recent, 9th March and 10 to 25 infected plants were noted.

https://inaturalist.nz/observations/21107914

The observer was well qualified to make the observation - Alex Fergus His job;

Ecology technician (field botanist mostly) at Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research, 

 

Is this site near you?

i have heard that there have been a few lophomyrtus found in golden bay with rust.

so far all plants ,pohutukawa mainly , i have heard of with rust have been in coastal locations in golden bay sheltered from the westerly.

i am optmistic with the help of the winds we have here our rata will not be too affected with rust.

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