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Jake Schultz

NZBF Does the beekeeping industry makes you excited to get into the field?

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NEW BEEKEEPERS:
What does the beekeeping industry do to make you excited to come into this field?
Why or why not?

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Well the halving of the multi-floral honey price in the last two years doesn't excite me.

 

Nor do all the hives around the place.  My view is that all the old beekeepers, who have had

a good run, now need to retire as that would help solve the over-stocking problem.   That would

excite me.

 

I wasn't excited to have 206mm of rain in December in Auckland, right when the target crops

were flowering.  The December before was 8mm...so so dry.  Global warming doesn't excite me.

 

I'd get excited if I could be persuaded that APINZ will achieve positive things for the industry.

I'm yet to be excited there...

 

 

 

 

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I’ve benefitted hugely from ‘the old beekeepers’. I’m not trying to make a living, which presumably makes things easier. Nearly without exception they have passed on useful knowledge and skill. 

 

It’s a generally positive group despite an outlook that has a lot of difficult problems. New products and techniques are keeping things fresh. 

 

Can I ask why you ask!

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1 hour ago, CraBee said:

Nor do all the hives around the place.  My view is that all the old beekeepers, who have had

a good run, now need to retire as that would help solve the over-stocking problem.   That would

excite me.

lol, my view is that the new beeks who didn't have a sound business model should go broke/get foreclosed/gtfo, while those with a clue should dance on their business graves

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Hey Jake, are you looking for some way to get your hands on some 'levy' money?

 

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11 hours ago, tommy dave said:

lol, my view is that the new beeks who didn't have a sound business model should go broke/get foreclosed/gtfo, while those with a clue should dance on their business graves

 

My comments about the old beekeepers was "tongue in cheek" :-))

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Nothing excited or drew me into this, it was only because my young son was very interested that I became interested.    I find that I have spent $2000 on getting into it a few months ago and now would be lucky to get $500 for everything if we wanted out.  I believe all newcomers or people interested in beekeeping should be warned away from it because there are far too many honey bees and too much stored honey in NZ and you are only making even more.  Having said that, I am excited for the day coming soon when we eat some of our multiflora honey.  We could have bought an entire shopping trolley full of all kinds of honey for $2000 though.  Enough to last the rest of our lives.

 

I am curious though how to figure out the hive density where we live (our hives are at home).  I was thinking of doing a drone flyover.  Maybe we have the only hives within 1km and therefore are sittting on some kind of urban gold-mine 🤑 shh don't tell anyone

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Just now, Paul Beer said:

I was thinking of doing a drone flyover.

Illegal. 

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2 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Illegal. 

Yes but...

 

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36 minutes ago, Paul Beer said:

I am curious though how to figure out the hive density where we live (our hives are at home).  I was thinking of doing a drone flyover.  Maybe we have the only hives within 1km and therefore are sittting on some kind of urban gold-mine 🤑 shh don't tell anyone

 

There's a good chance I'm pretty close to you... I'm in Sockburn, closer to Upper Ric

Edited by BRB
Location
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Bees still make me excited as does a good honey flow. The beekeeping industry ; not so much !

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Its the challenge of learning, and not always about beekeeping. Keeping bees also teaches us about the wider environment. Can you be a beekeeper without being aware of the flora around you, the weather, the impacts of humans and their chemicals? Maybe the bees are one of the canaries....we ignore them at our peril.

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8 hours ago, Paul Beer said:

Nothing excited or drew me into this, it was only because my young son was very interested that I became interested.    I find that I have spent $2000 on getting into it a few months ago and now would be lucky to get $500 for everything if we wanted out.  I believe all newcomers or people interested in beekeeping should be warned away from it because there are far too many honey bees and too much stored honey in NZ and you are only making even more.  Having said that, I am excited for the day coming soon when we eat some of our multiflora honey.  We could have bought an entire shopping trolley full of all kinds of honey for $2000 though.  Enough to last the rest of our lives.

 

I am curious though how to figure out the hive density where we live (our hives are at home).  I was thinking of doing a drone flyover.  Maybe we have the only hives within 1km and therefore are sittting on some kind of urban gold-mine 🤑 shh don't tell anyone

 

I’ve figured out and told others that having bees has gotta be the most expensive way possible to get free honey, and addictive too.

Commercial option... nah I reckon need years of experience to do it right and it seems a pretty cut throat industry.

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On 8/02/2019 at 3:42 PM, Jake Schultz said:
NEW BEEKEEPERS:
What does the beekeeping industry do to make you excited to come into this field?
Why or why not?

I’d be interested to know why your asking lol potential advertising campaign?

 

Currently for most people in the know there is a long list of reasons why not to get into this industry.

 

Other than that, passion for bees, that should be the main driver for anyone considering being a beekeeper.

 

There is of course a long list of reasons why most of us are beekeepers, it’s a good lifestyle if you enjoy hard manual labour and sweating it up in full overalls in 30degree heat, you like driving for ages to remote places on crappy roads and dodgy farm tracks, you like being stung by angry bees, your not really a people person, you enjoy being uncontactable and out of cellphone reception, you like to work all season and maybe you’ll get paid.

There are definitely more pluses for this great industry but that will do for now 😉

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12 hours ago, Deon said:

I’ve figured out and told others that having bees has gotta be the most expensive way possible to get free honey, and addictive too.

I’d say fishing from your own pleasure craft would be the dearest way to get free fish.

I wouldn’t know . I don’t have a boat .

Thats not the point . 

Its the challenge and the relaxation  I get from bees that keeps me in . I just like bees and their colourful homes 

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Just now, M4tt said:

 

Double post deleted 

Edited by M4tt

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1 hour ago, M4tt said:

I’d say fishing from your own pleasure craft would be the dearest way to get free fish.

I wouldn’t know . I don’t have a boat .

Thats not the point . 

Its the challenge and the relaxation  I get from bees that keeps me in . I just like bees and their colourful homes 

 

Completely agree with you, so true. 👍

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On 8/02/2019 at 11:36 PM, olbe said:

Hey Jake, are you looking for some way to get your hands on some 'levy' money?

 

I don't think so.  @Jake Schultz is an educator and used to work in UCOL (Palmerston North) running the Apiculture course.

He is now in Wellington and working on some other Bee Education stuff.

 

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I got into beekeeping after a life long love of bees not that I knew anything about them. I was looking for a challenge in retirement.

The learning curve has been steep but very interesting, so many facets,  bee anatomy, physiology, reproduction, hive dynamics, diet during the seasons,  diseases and treatments, chemistry, compliance for food production, exctaction, packaging, labeling, marketing, housing, woodwork, cleaning, plastics vers wood ware, properties of honey, pollen and propolis, flowers,  trees for bees.  The list goes on, certainly an all absorbing time consuming thinking type of thing keeping bees.  A bee hive is definitely not a garden ornament.  Have I been excited keeping bees very surely yes just ask anyone who has had to listen to me rabbit on about my girls.

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37 minutes ago, Oma said:

I got into beekeeping after a life long love of bees not that I knew anything about them. I was looking for a challenge in retirement.

The learning curve has been steep but very interesting, so many facets,  bee anatomy, physiology, reproduction, hive dynamics, diet during the seasons,  diseases and treatments, chemistry, compliance for food production, exctaction, packaging, labeling, marketing, housing, woodwork, cleaning, plastics vers wood ware, properties of honey, pollen and propolis, flowers,  trees for bees.  The list goes on, certainly an all absorbing time consuming thinking type of thing keeping bees.  A bee hive is definitely not a garden ornament.  Have I been excited keeping bees very surely yes just ask anyone who has had to listen to me rabbit on about my girls.

All that, plus as a died in the wool DIYer, the building and assembling. How I wish I had realised how important it was for a woman to own a bench saw, regret not getting one long, long ago. 

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For sure it has it's challenges. And many is the day I open up crappy hives and wonder why the heck we are still doing it when we have to  rely on so many external factors all playing ball for our bees to get out there and gather honey.

So why do we persevere ?

 

Is it the buzz of cracking a lid in the spring and seeing a box of bees , or the anticipation of what might be as the willow comes into blossom and the days lengthen , or the adrenalin rush as we plonk boxes on pumping hives knowing what might be ..... and the sense of achievement as a heavy  truck wends it's way home ..... to the sense of rightness as locals come to our shop on a sunday afternoon to  savour the flavour of our seasons harvest.

It's an earthy sense of oneness at contributing to a communities supply of food ..... without which we are stuffed.

 

 

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On 8/02/2019 at 11:36 PM, olbe said:

Hey Jake, are you looking for some way to get your hands on some 'levy' money?

 

 

The reason I brought this up and pose it to the group is partially surrounding the levy but mostly a question of 'What is Apiculture NZ doing to excite and SUPPORT new younger individuals to even consider apiculture as a job. Not necessarily beekeeping specifically but the whole field altogether (research, technology, education, actual beekeeping, export, etc). I'm trying to get the big picture from new beekeepers and experienced  beekeepers alike. Many of use understand a lot of the concerns in the industry but how is any levy or funding that apiculture governing body has actually making it an appealing field to even go into in the first place? If there isn't any, then they are failing to support current and future beekeepers.

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I wasn’t interested in bees until I started working with them it wasn’t something I yearned to do.

I still remember the first time I had to work a hive all by myself I was terrified !

In no time at all I had the bug and haven’t stopped learning and never will.

its getting kids heads in hives and hands on hivetools that will spark enthusiasm 

and that starts in schools like what @Markypoo is doing with his kids. IMHO

 

but please no more increase in hive numbers !

the bees do not need saving there’s too many as it is 

Edited by frazzledfozzle
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I would support, but not necessarily  encourage, any of my children to get into beekeeping commercially 

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7 hours ago, Jake Schultz said:

 

The reason I brought this up and pose it to the group is partially surrounding the levy but mostly a question of 'What is Apiculture NZ doing to excite and SUPPORT new younger individuals to even consider apiculture as a job. Not necessarily beekeeping specifically but the whole field altogether (research, technology, education, actual beekeeping, export, etc). I'm trying to get the big picture from new beekeepers and experienced  beekeepers alike. Many of use understand a lot of the concerns in the industry but how is any levy or funding that apiculture governing body has actually making it an appealing field to even go into in the first place? If there isn't any, then they are failing to support current and future beekeepers.

It doesn’t need to be an appealing field.

It certainly wasn’t an appealing field when I got into it, I just stumbled across it.

I personally think it’s better that way because you end up with people who have the drive to actually be good beekeepers.

If people want to do something they can seek it out themselves, not everything needs to be delivered on a platter.

 

Most beekeepers don’t want more beekeepers.

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