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philtsa

How to find out if bee hives are behind the wall?

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We found bees coming in and out of the ventilating holes of the wall.  We used NO WASP spray to kill some of them. They seemed to switch to other holes and one or two were found in the bathroom behind.  What can we do to eradicate them forever?

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If it's a brick wall there'll be a continuous cavity behind it which will give the bees access to the entire exterior wall of the house. Call a pest exterminator they have special

gear for the job.

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Is there a possibility that bee hives are formed behind the wall? It was found first in December and now February.  If that is the case not just exterminate the bees but also to remove the hive

 

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It's more than a possibility. That's what is happening. Removing the combs will mean first finding exactly where they are, then removing interior wall lining to get at it. 

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That will be a big job as the wall behind where we found the bees were the bathroom.  What should we do first? Take out the wall or exterminate the bees

 

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We are unable to find someone in Auckland to help us remove bees.  Rentokil asked us to contact Beekeepers as they claimed that bees are not pests.  Who at Beekeepers can help us?

 

 

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Exterminate, then clean up. 

Edited by yesbut

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1 minute ago, philtsa said:

We are unable to find someone in Auckland to help us remove bees.  Rentokil asked us to contact Beekeepers as they claimed that bees are not pests.  Who at Beekeepers can help us?

 

 

If you explain the bees are in a location where saving them is not possible.......

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Let us know how you get on....

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The bees are in the cavity between the wall and jib board.  We found one in Auckland World Class Pest Control.  We were quoted $140 to remove the bees and guaranteed for nine months only.  This is a passive way and see what happens after that

 

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@philtsa Can you get a photo of the insect (bee) so that we can ensure that we are talking about bees and not wasps.  

It need to be a pretty clear picture.

 

Thanks

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I will do it tomorrow

 

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FWIW... Some of the bee-removal-specialists in our community own a "passive infra-red camera."

With it they see the heat image of the wall ceiling.  The part of the wall with bees behind it is distinctly warmer than the rest of the building.

(One brand is FLIR) There are IR cameras, and also camera "dongles" you can plug into your Amdroid or iPhone.

They sure take the guess-work out of assessing the extent of "infestation."

They also produce an interesting image of hives in the bee-yard.  Best used early in the day before solar heat distorts the picture.

Very interesting in Winter.

 

Jerry

-- Oakland, Ca

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Why, may I ask is there a problem with having a resident colony within the exterior walls of your home? Over my lifetime of beekeeping I have met numerous people who are quite proud of their resident bees, always wanting to show them off to visitors, especially those with an interest in beekeeping. Many years prior to the onslaught of varroa mite I was shown a bee nest in the wall of a house by the owner, a zoology lecturer. He had hives in his back garden, but insisted that the bees were residents prior to him buying the house. Using some heat detection equipment he borrowed from the zoology department he discovered that the nest covered an area of about 5 sq metres. The bees were in the wall above the head of his bed. Every night he would go to sleep to the sound of a gentle hum. 

I cannot for any reason think why someone would want the bees removed. If they are using a vent that would be problematic for the human residents, then you block off all vents excluding those that are above head height or are in a position where the bee flight does not affect you. If you leave them there they may die off from varroa mite, in which case there won't be many dead bees to cause any smells. If they survive many years you can sell them to a breeder for being varroa resistant. 

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7 hours ago, Old Timer said:

I cannot for any reason think why someone would want the bees removed. If they are using a vent that would be problematic for the human residents, then you block off all vents excluding those that are above head height or are in a position where the bee flight does not affect you. If you leave them there they may die off from varroa mite, in which case there won't be many dead bees to cause any smells. If they survive many years you can sell them to a breeder for being varroa resistant. 

Hives that die from varroa do smell, and are pretty nasty, especially if left for a while for the wax moths to get into.

The honey and pollen will attract all sorts of creatures and a lot of them. If any of the comb breaks the honey has to go somewhere and imagine if it got AFB - unlikely but a real pain to address.

 

And the ones I’ve seen have bees coming out in all sorts of strange places like bathrooms and ceiling cavities. They chew on some types of insulation and move it out the way. 

 

I like like bees but I wouldn’t have them in the house.

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@Old Timer - perhaps it is about the area the colony is in. In Auckland the uncapped nectar festers in the wall once the bees die off for winter, and the sodding ants would contribute to the problem and use the area as a nest.

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7 hours ago, Old Timer said:

I cannot for any reason think why someone would want the bees removed.

 Where are the required removable frames ? 

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17 minutes ago, yesbut said:

 Where are the required removable frames ? 

 

Its essentially a wild hive so doesn’t need removable frames 

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When is a feral hive no longer a feral hive?

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10 good reasons for not having bees in a wall.

One . AFB.  A lot less likely than in managed hives but possible and a lot harder to manage detect and eradicate.

Two. Varoa. Will definitely spread varoa to managed hives when it dies.

Three. Will probably get robbed out by aggressive bees when it dies.

Four . If not robbed will ferment and stink.

Five. Bees can and do damaged wall linings and insulation.

Six. Make it really hard to do maintenance like painting.

Seven. Drones have bad genetics (any hive that swarms has bad genetics).

Eight. Feral hives compete with domestic hives for scarce resources.

Nine. Unknown aggressive traits.

ten. Very expensive to remove.

Next challenge is were someone to find 10 good reasons for keeping it.

 

 

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On 12/02/2019 at 7:52 AM, john berry said:

Next challenge is were someone to find 10 good reasons for keeping it.

Thank you John for 7 very worthy reasons against my earlier response. Seven, eight and nine are looking like you are scraping the bottom of the proverbial barrel to fill your quota. Down here in the lower South Island we don't suffer from ants, cockroaches, humidity nor aggressive bees. Every hive that I have seen that has died from varroa has had less than 100 bees left remaining, therefore no rotting/maggots and no smell. 

There are reasons why people usually keep the bees within, usually the cost of removal outweighs the nuisance value. As a beekeeper I would try to remove them or at least use expanding gap filler to lock them in and encase them in their own tomb.

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8 hours ago, Old Timer said:

Down here in the lower South Island we don't suffer from ants, cockroaches, humidity nor aggressive bees.

You certainly do, I've seen them. Lots of them. They drive rental vehicles usually.

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