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Hello all, my colleague and I from the University of Auckland are looking into a solution to solving beehive theft. I am conducting research around this to hear people's experience with theft and whether they will be interested in our product. Please, can you share with me your experience as well as what will make your beekeeping experience great?

Thank you

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if this is something formal then it's best to use your real name instead of 'dammy'.

In answer to your questions, i've been lucky so far with respect to hive theft = haven't experienced it first-hand. I'm suspicious of new products that don't have some sort of proven history. And i'm fairly cheap. Hope that's useful.

 

Not sure what you mean by what will make my experience great

Edited by tommy dave
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14 hours ago, tommy dave said:

if this is something formal then it's best to use your real name instead of 'dammy'.

In answer to your questions, i've been lucky so far with respect to hive theft = haven't experienced it first-hand. I'm suspicious of new products that don't have some sort of proven history. And i'm fairly cheap. Hope that's useful.

 

Not sure what you mean by what will make my experience great

Thank you for your feedback @tommy dave. What will make your beekeeping experience great in terms of whether there is any issues or challenges associated with beekeeping that maybe technology or even community can solve? But thank you for your feedback will put it into consideration.

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FWIW... I live an hour's drive from the edge of the Almond Pollination in northern California.  Hive thefts are a real problem... especially from staging yards.
Beekeepers reduce risk by driving bees directly to their contracted orchards where they immediately get distributed into the orchard.  They're a lot more  trouble to steel when spread around a couple hundred acres. 
Some beekeepers install a lo-jack kind of product in some of their hives. If the hives move unexpectedly the Sheriff or state police, etc. can be called in to investigate.

Yards have been discovered which are virtual chop-shops!  Bee hives have their identifying burned-in "brands" or painted on  ID info defaced or covered over.

Boxes get reorganized and moved out to almond pollination customers who utilize the 'spot market' rather than nailing down contracts prior to the season.

Some of these stolen hives become nucs sold to unsuspecting backyard beekeepers.  (I was once contacted by someone, who in retrospect, seemed fishy.)

 

RFID "tags" are pretty cheap these days.  Battery powered RFID readers are in the marketplace too. The ID tags can be placed in hives in places where thieves will  probably overlook them. Buy a large quantity of tags. Build a database of owners and tag-ranges distributed.  Install tags in vulnerable hives.   If suspicious hives are found, and have ID tags that weren't transferred from the original owner,  you have some evidence of illegal activity. 

 

That's my 2¢

Jerry Przybylski

-- Oakland, Ca

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"whether they will be interested in our product.". I have a question, ummm what is your product?

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