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Jee Yang

Storing supers

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Hi guys, I'm planning to go away on OE for few years and was wondering what to do with my supers.

 

I will sell of all the hives I have in the next few months before I go, but I was hoping to keep my supers and frames as the prices for the hiveware always seem to increase as the time goes by, and also nobody would buy secondhand gear.

 

What is the best way to store the frames and supers for long term storage?

 

These are all drawn frames by the way, so I assume I would have to scrape them off, so the wax moth won't eat them all up?

 

What would you guys do in my situation?

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6 hours ago, Jee Yang said:

What would you guys do in my situation?

I'd stick them in a corner of a shed and forget about them. The wax moth won't do much to them if they don't have pollen..

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On the contrary I've just scraped down and water blasted everything in my shed. 

Freezing and wrapping the frames in boxes works well for one season, but unused supers stored for over a year potentially go really yuk!!

The wax moth somehow gets its eggs through the plastic wrap and if left alone will 95% remove all the wax off the frames leaving heavy cobwebbing, excreta and cocoons. I'm pretty sure once they get a hold in there the wax moth can reproduce. They keep going until nothing is left .

Wax moth aren't the only things decomposing drawn frames. There are pollen mites and the wax gets very delicate and brittle.

I've run all the scrapings through the wax melted and rewax the frames .

 

In my opinion I didn't think it was going to be very productive giving bees deformed and broken down frames to clean up so mine will start drawing from scratch next season .

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simply sell the supers with the hives.

supers do not store well long term.

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20 hours ago, Jee Yang said:

Hi guys, I'm planning to go away on OE for few years and was wondering what to do with my supers.

 

I will sell of all the hives I have in the next few months before I go, but I was hoping to keep my supers and frames as the prices for the hiveware always seem to increase as the time goes by, and also nobody would buy secondhand gear.

 

What is the best way to store the frames and supers for long term storage?

 

These are all drawn frames by the way, so I assume I would have to scrape them off, so the wax moth won't eat them all up?

 

What would you guys do in my situation?

sell the lot.

Not many buyers out there though.

if you're worried about prices increasing, use the cash to buy a bunch of kitset boxes and waxed plastic frames. Store them instead, not much risk of those deteriorating...

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Supers without frames, if clean and dry, will store for years.

 

Comb, if white (never had brood), and no pollen, can store for a year but longer the wax deteriorates. Don't store next to dark combs because the dark combs will give the wax moths enough fuel to eat the white combs also.

 

Dark combs and combs with pollen, unlikely to be much left of them if stored for more than a year, regardless what precautions you take.

 

Since you talked about scraping them off, I assume the frames are plastic. You could just leave them to be eaten by wax moths, then clean and re wax them once you come back.

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Greater wax moth will eat everything and chew holes in your boxes as well. Lesser wax moth will eat even white comb if it is left long enough. Freezing and then completely sealing from wax moth and storing In a cool dark and dry environment for several years should be possible but they won't be as good as new and don't be surprised of the moths get in. Keeping them frozen the whole time would do the trick but the cost probably exceeds the gain .Empty boxes stored in a dry environment will be fine as will clean plastic frames.Leaving the moths to clean up the frames will leave a dreadful mess and they will damage your boxes.

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

You could just leave them to be eaten by wax moths, then clean and re wax them once you come back.

This will create a huge webbed mess and increase wax moth numbers. 

Wax is worth good money why not melt it all down and store in blocks or sell and use the coin to buy new .. my 2c worth. 

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Wax moth do eat through brood comb, particularly the darker stuff. They're consuming it for the protein. They're not very interested in the white wax from honeycomb because it doesn't have food value for them.

Wax moth don't like moving air, and don't do well with exposure to light.

Boxes of brood frames can be stored outside standing on end in a place where there is a lot of sun light, and where a draft blows through them.
Then the challenge is keeping the mice and squirrels from going after that exposed food source.

#2 or #4 wire-cloth screens over the box ends will keep the rodents out.  

Some beeks protect stacks of boxes of brood frames with clear plastic covers with solar powered vent fans installed in them. The kind of vent fan used for RVs and Boats...

Again... screen the bottom of the stack to keep the rodents out... and keep the stack off the ground.

If you produce nucs, you can sell off all your old frames.  It's a way of cycling through the inventory.

That's my 2¢

Jerry Przybylski

-- Oakland, Ca

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16 minutes ago, G Przybylski said:

Wax moth do eat through brood comb, particularly the darker stuff. They're consuming it for the protein. They're not very interested in the white wax from honeycomb because it doesn't have food value for them.

Wax moth don't like moving air, and don't do well with exposure to light.

Boxes of brood frames can be stored outside standing on end in a place where there is a lot of sun light, and where a draft blows through them.
Then the challenge is keeping the mice and squirrels from going after that exposed food source.

#2 or #4 wire-cloth screens over the box ends will keep the rodents out.  

Some beeks protect stacks of boxes of brood frames with clear plastic covers with solar powered vent fans installed in them. The kind of vent fan used for RVs and Boats...

Again... screen the bottom of the stack to keep the rodents out... and keep the stack off the ground.

If you produce nucs, you can sell off all your old frames.  It's a way of cycling through the inventory.

That's my 2¢

Jerry Przybylski

-- Oakland, Ca

what do we get for 10c ?

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11 hours ago, jamesc said:

what do we get for 10c ?

Jeez.. makes my 2c look a wee bit on the tight side.. I suppose if you take into consideration the exchange rate... 

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I agree with Alistair and John Berry. Basically clean all the wax from the frames, stack the supers (with frames in them), don't cover the stacks. As long as the supers aren't in direct sunlight they'll be as good as gold till you return. 

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On 7/02/2019 at 8:29 PM, jamesc said:

They're not very interested in the white wax from honeycomb because it doesn't have food value for them.

Utter bs! I have wax moth in my shed, if I don't regularly go through my stored blocks of beeswax and rub the moth out then in a couple of years there won't be much left. Also, I have to seal all cartons of foundation otherwise it'll be chewed away too. 

I'm lucky that we don't have the greater wax moth down south, we would then have to wage war against them, we don't have time for that.

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I haven’t found them to be interested in clean wax. Wonder if it’s just that they are more interested in dark wax and pollen.

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