Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi there.

I’m not a fan so far with queen excluders. Mainly with all the dead drones and I’m never sure when to exactly put them on.

It got me thinking about hive setup and how bees work.

How  would this work....

At the start of spring, or possibly when the treatment is out put the brood box (s) on the top of say 3 or 4 empty boxes. Wouldn’t the bees work their way down and backfill as they go? Would it not keep the brood together and suit how they would naturally keep their hive, by working downwards?

Im thinking a downside would be that there would have been brood cycled through all honey boxes at some stage. Possibly a top entrance could be kept until they work their way down a bit, then changed to a bottom entrance.

has anyone tried this?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 6
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Days

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

For many years I thought bees naturally had the brood at the bottom and honey at the top but I'm now pretty sure that they have the brood near the entrance and the honey further away. If you don't lik

two reasons for drones stuck in them, either xcluder is in-between the drones and the exit, or they are starving and can't get up to the food. easy way to know when to put excluder on is to never

I can't see what the set up has to do with not liking QXs, but put that to one side. Can you explain why you think that bees 'naturally' work downwards?

45 minutes ago, Adam O'Sullivan said:

they would naturally keep their hive, by working downwards? 

I can't see what the set up has to do with not liking QXs, but put that to one side. Can you explain why you think that bees 'naturally' work downwards?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Adam O'Sullivan said:

I’m not a fan so far with queen excluders. Mainly with all the dead drones and I’m never sure when to exactly put them on.

two reasons for drones stuck in them, either xcluder is in-between the drones and the exit, or they are starving and can't get up to the food.

easy way to know when to put excluder on is to never take it off. easy as.

 

2 hours ago, Adam O'Sullivan said:

put the brood box (s) on the top of say 3 or 4 empty boxes. Wouldn’t the bees work their way down and backfill as they go?

one problem is the bottom boxes tend not to be guarded. that lets in every robber and pest. bottom boxes tend to go moldy etc. not good.

bees like to work up more than down. they can push down @tudor but they need to be forced to, something you do not want to so in swarm season.

end of season is a bit different as they are packing down anyway so its not really forcing them to go down.

 

@Adam O'Sullivan i would just stick to what works rather than try to reinvent the wheel. you will be much more successful that way.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

For many years I thought bees naturally had the brood at the bottom and honey at the top but I'm now pretty sure that they have the brood near the entrance and the honey further away. If you don't like excluders don't use them. I use them on all my hives now for commercial reasons as brood is really frowned upon in the extracting room but I kept bees very successfully for over 40 years without ever using an excluder. If you're not using excluders you have to be a bit more careful not to over super your hives as you want them to cram down towards autumn not breed up through four boxes.

99% plus hives are run in the same configuration as when I started beekeeping over 50 years ago and there is a good reason for that.

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, john berry said:

For many years I thought bees naturally had the brood at the bottom and honey at the top but I'm now pretty sure that they have the brood near the entrance and the honey further away. If you don't like excluders don't use them.

I would certainly echo this. For various reasons I've got hives with entrances in different places (e.g. nucs with front entrances or side entrances). Bees always store honey furthest from the entrance.

I also find this helpful to know with putting a hive back together (I like to put it back together exactly how it was). If you've pulled a frame out of a brood box and you're not sure which way round it was in look at which end has more honey and that'll be the end that was furthest from the entrance.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...