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dacrebankbees

NZBF How much brood does a hive need?

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Hi I have my first hive that has grown from a nucleus.  I currently have two full boxes, a queen excluder and a 3/4 box above that.  I had a look in it a few days ago and noticed that while the bottom box has heaps of brood - and i saw my queen she is only a couple of months old because the grafted one failed and they made a new queen.  But the second box is choc full of honey most of it capped and they are working on the box above the queen excluder.  My question is doesn't the queen need more room for brood?  It doesn't look like she has been into the second box at all and now there is no room for her to lay in there anyway because its full..  Should I put another box in there and move that full one up above the excluder?    I have not seen any queen cells, and have checked all the frames.  They look to be doing amazingly well, its very exciting!

 

TIA

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What you describe sounds perfect for this time of year. You can take the honey above the excluder for your own use and the bees will have enough food to see them through winter and in to the coming spring. 

Dont forget to apply autumn varroa treatments no later than the end of February.

Edited by dansar
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The other variation on this that I am finding is a bottom box loaded with pollen, 2nd with brood, but being constrained by nectar. I’m glad I asked here as I thought it was trying to superceed, and I’d have had a swarm if I’d left them.

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It's normal for bees to pack out the brood area with pollen and honey at this time of the year.

While it seems unusual for mid summer, they are way ahead of us with their instincts and are preparing for winter by storing as much as they can while slowing down the queen laying. They don't need a whole lot of new bees heading into Autumn and winter because as bees slow down foraging, they live longer and don't need to be replaced as quickly.

I agree with the advice @dansar gave above. 

 

Get the honey off that you want for yourself by mid Feb and get your varroa treatment in . 

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Can I ask what varroa treatment you prefer to use in late feb? I take it from the above comments I should just let them carry on with the two boxes they have for brood. Thanks

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1 hour ago, dacrebankbees said:

Can I ask what varroa treatment you prefer to use in late feb? I take it from the above comments I should just let them carry on with the two boxes they have for brood. Thanks

My treatment of choice ?

Oxalic Acid and Glycerine Staples .

There is a whole thread following their invention and development by @philbee if you have a couple of days spare to do some reading . 

I have no faith in synthetics at this time .

Edited by M4tt
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4 hours ago, M4tt said:

My treatment of choice ?

Oxalic Acid and Glycerine Staples .

There is a whole thread following their invention and development by @philbee if you have a couple of day spare

 

That would be this monster thread.

 

I attempted to summarise it as a document, although it’s no substitute for the real thing. The thread covers the developement and reasons why the method exists as is.

 

There are a couple in minor things I will add, some of which are in the below thread in the legalities of OA in the hive - from this thread.

 

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On 27/01/2019 at 5:17 PM, cBank said:

 

That would be this monster thread.

 

I attempted to summarise it as a document, although it’s no substitute for the real thing. The thread covers the developement and reasons why the method exists as is.

 

There are a couple in minor things I will add, some of which are in the below thread in the legalities of OA in the hive - from this thread.

 

and again, i have to reiterate  others comments about Cbanks summary... Its very good! I have read the original thread from the beginning... lol several times and it is good if u have the time but the summary gives you the basics.

My turn to try it this treatment period

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@dacrebankbees, while I agree the staples as detailed above are a good thing I think that sticking with synthetic treatment may be the simpler and better option your first winter. There are some compexities with using the Oxalic staples that may be best avoided until you are right up to speed.

Some folk have had problems with synthetics yet my own experience is getting them in the hives early rather than late, using the right amount of strips and being careful with their placement has still been an effective treatment.

I will use Apivar (by Veto-pharma) this autumn.

I would study up sugar/alcohol shake as a method of ensuring the treatment has been effective and hold a view to moving to the Oxalic staples in the future.

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I think the staples as developed can be needlessly sophisticated for the couple of hives in the back yard hobbyist. I'm still using half towels folded up & stuck here and there. It's not rocket science it's simply ensuring that where the bees are there's oxalic hanging around. I haven't done a shake for years.

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On 31/01/2019 at 10:00 AM, yesbut said:

I think the staples as developed can be needlessly sophisticated for the couple of hives in the back yard hobbyist. 

I'm a backyard hobbyst and I think the staples are very simple and easy to make and apply. Ideal for hobbysts. 

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