Jump to content
Shine

Air bubbles in thixotropic Manuka

Recommended Posts

Hi Beeks.

 

I got some very thixotropic honey out of my hives and after bottling it have noticed lots of air bubbles in it. I was hoping they would come to the surface, but they ain't moving.

 

Anybody got any ideas on a way to make the air bubbles move to the surface?

 

Thanks

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Air bubbles are a sign that it's good manuka. The old method of getting rid of them was to heat the crap out of it but that is no longer acceptable and rightly so. I suppose a centrifuge might work or perhaps even something like a paint shaker but I regard air bubbles as a natural part of manuka honey and think they should be treated as an asset. Generally manuka is sold granulated so you don't see any bubbles anyway. Manuka is a Relatively fast granulating honey and not really suitable for liquid. You can do it but it's not easy.

  • Like 3
  • Good Info 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The word thixotrophic explains this phenomenon, and you can make it liquid by stirring it, but that will introduce more bubbles !

 

 

  • Thanks 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, john berry said:

I regard air bubbles as a natural part of manuka honey and think they should be treated as an asset.

So right @john berrypart of the beauty of manuka (& heather). I refuse to consume the granulated version of either. Stir in more bubbles I say, they're like little aromatic jewels.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've encountered the air bubble feature in Manuka too. I find it more common after warming from granulated to pour. I confess to a little stirring of the product (too speed the result) and this has perhaps been my error.

I don't think the aerated product is a particularly good look from a purchasers view point sadly.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Ali said:

I've encountered the air bubble feature in Manuka too. I find it more common after warming from granulated to pour. I confess to a little stirring of the product (too speed the result) and this has perhaps been my error.

I don't think the aerated product is a particularly good look from a purchasers view point sadly.

 

You know quite a lot for a Beginner bk Ali ?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another more sinister possibility is that the air bubbles could be CO2 from fermentation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Ali said:

I don't think the aerated product is a particularly good look from a purchasers view point sadly. 

NZ is truly a different world.

 

47 minutes ago, Jamo said:

sinister possibility is that the air bubbles could be CO2 from fermentation. 

Maybe, but the smell will tell you. More often I find granulated/creamed honey is a great way of concealing a multitude of sins, including fermentation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Dave Black said:

Maybe, but the smell will tell you. More often I find granulated/creamed honey is a great way of concealing a multitude of sins, including fermentation.

i've found that the lightly fermented honey i've had a bucket or so of didn't granulate over time like most honey does, and instead stayed somewhat more liquid and smelling like peach blossom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have access to an ultrasonicator cleaning bath (as used for cleaning glasses ) it will work a treat

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Peter M said:

If you have access to an ultrasonicator cleaning bath (as used for cleaning glasses ) it will work a treat

Interesting idea. I have often wondered whether it would be possible to break up the jelly in manuka using ultrasound or something similar.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 15/01/2019 at 6:12 PM, Jamo said:

Another more sinister possibility is that the air bubbles could be CO2 from fermentation.

Luckily this is not the issue

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Peter M said:

If you have access to an ultrasonicator cleaning bath (as used for cleaning glasses ) it will work a treat

Interesting idea. I don’t have access to one but it’s somrthing I will have a look into.

 

My initial thoughts were to use a vibrator (sex toy) ?. Easily available, but the the thought of licking the honey off afterwards was just too funny so idea got ditched ?

  • Haha 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hey this is something I'm mulling over at the moment too. Ive got some 20L buckets of squeezed out manuka cappings. day 3 and the bubbles arent going anywhere. my next bright idea is to put a bucket on a record turntable and let it spin for half a day... the theory being that the bubbles will slowly migrate to the centre, join up and get big enough to force their way to the surface.

 

i'll either get back to you with an update at the end of the day, or much sooner (when the bucket immediately smashes the delicate turntable)

 

oh and i put some of the honey in a jar and used a vibrating plate sander that has rubber pad on it and buzzed the jar for a minute.. it was unmoved

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think in the commercial world a vacuum chamber is used to remove air from honey. A fair bit out of my league!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, lexy said:

my next bright idea is to put a bucket on a record turntable and let it spin for half a day... the theory being that the bubbles will slowly migrate to the centre, join up and get big enough to force their way to the surface.

 

i'll either get back to you with an update...

ok record player didnt do a thing. Apparently it has to be an awful lot faster than 45rpm

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I have ever seen the tiny air bubbles come out of the Manuka once it's there in the jar.

Sadly it can look like a foreign matter mixed through to those that do not know.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the past I have used a 1.5 litre bath type sonicator to remove bubbles from viscous solutions (sugar, glycerol etc), but only in containers up to about 1 litre. Its quick and fun - a clear zone first appears at the bottom of the liquid and the zone quickly expands upwards. Heating is not a problem. 

 

Mine came from https://www.bransonic.com/

 

There are some interesting options on aliexpress

 

image.thumb.png.9464625cfd7aa132277e85fc1024823c.png

 

This website shows a continuous flow device that might be practical for honey processing, but it uses what looks like an expensive high tech probe sonicator

 

http://blog.sonomechanics.com/blog/ultrasonic-degassing-of-viscous-liquids

 

(and I thought this was the time of year when beekeepers were flat out ...)

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i filled 2 jars from my capping press. the bubbles are big because i filled them above the strainer. the jar on the left was the control and wasnt stirred, the jar on the right was gently stirred once every day so as not to introduce more air. pic is on the 4th day. jars were kept at room temp so max of around 25c maybe

 

so yeh... conclusion is stirring doesnt work that well

PSX_20190124_102226.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, lexy said:

so yeh... conclusion is stirring doesnt work that well

You have smaller bubbles, so that is a start.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

You have smaller bubbles, so that is a start.

I'm wondering if that's good or not - being smaller Id imagine they're less likely to work their way to the surface over time. certainly less air in there overall though

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't use a capping press, no bubbles....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, yesbut said:

If you don't use a capping press, no bubbles....

a man can only drink so much mead?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×