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Shane Parker

Honey Super Storage

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9 hours ago, Ali said:

@tristanre the boxes left out in on the hives over winter not lasting much more than 4 years, they are painted I guess not paraffin dipped?

 

I know for us our supers wouldn’t last long stored on top of hives because our climate is guide humid and it can get wet. 

The boxes rot out along the bottom and tops all our boxes are dipped and painted.

You could probably get away with it in a dry climate .

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12 hours ago, tristan said:

however leaving boxes on until weather cools down is a common practice. once the temps drop down enough wax moth is not a problem and they can be easily stored in a shed.

 

When would you suggest removing them typically? May? And using this method do the bees continue to control wax moth in the empty supers above the top feeder until you remove them. If so, that all seems very clever ?

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5 hours ago, Sailabee said:

For a few hobby supers, fine stainless mesh top and bottom of the stack sealing from mice etc, put in cold spot on stand with a very ventilated roof over where there is a good flow of cold up through the stack. Would not work on commercial scale though.

Yes it can work for commercial, store on pallets with mesh top and bottom inside a pole shed with roof and shade cloth walls,  dont do it myself as no room but i know a few who do.

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21 hours ago, Ali said:

@tristanre the boxes left out in on the hives over winter not lasting much more than 4 years, they are painted I guess not paraffin dipped?

untreated ones start to rot at 2 years. treated ones vary a fair bit depending on how well its done and what with. paraffin is usually the best but even then they can degrade.

the other thing is the staples/nails/screws rusting out.

in short anything left out in the weather is going to have a shorter lifespan. your also always going to get some stock damage, storm damage etc.

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12 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

I know for us our supers wouldn’t last long stored on top of hives because our climate is guide humid and it can get wet. 

The boxes rot out along the bottom and tops all our boxes are dipped and painted.

You could probably get away with it in a dry climate .

we are even more humid.

 

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11 hours ago, CHCHPaul said:

 

When would you suggest removing them typically? May? And using this method do the bees continue to control wax moth in the empty supers above the top feeder until you remove them. If so, that all seems very clever ?

remove them whenever you think its cool enough. 

 

bees don't usually look after them. what they do is rob it out and clean up the combs. but because its separated from the hive they usually leave it alone.

however if its early and hive is still strong and hasn't reduced to wintering size, the excess bees can still go up and look after it. but once the bees numbers drop they will leave it alone. thats why its on the feeder, the feeder acts as a spacer to separate the hive from the supers.

often you can take them off and have no bees in them.

a bit of timing is required. 

 

if you leave the boxes on in a cold climate the bees may move up into them and leave the queen behind.

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Research some years back concluded that the adult wax moth:

  • will almost always try to enter a stack of boxes from the top (with other holes in supers all bets are off...), and
  • is not inclined to enter if there is any air flow coming up through the stack.

Practical import?   You can put the stack of supers up off the base, so there will be a 'chimney' of fresh air being drawn in from the bottom and flowing up through the stack to the top.

From memory, some of this may have come out of the Waikato many years ago (?).  Mostly open sheds for storing supers would  be built with a slatted floor (and mesh for the mice!), so that the air flow would always be there.

With the prevalence and availability of freezing units now, I'm not sure sure of the need for this level of activity - freezing wax moths is, IMHO, a much better way to go...

 

Nick

Tauranga

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36 minutes ago, NickWallingford said:

Research some years back concluded that the adult wax moth:

  • will almost always try to enter a stack of boxes from the top (with other holes in supers all bets are off...), and
  • is not inclined to enter if there is any air flow coming up through the stack.

Practical import?   You can put the stack of supers up off the base, so there will be a 'chimney' of fresh air being drawn in from the bottom and flowing up through the stack to the top.

From memory, some of this may have come out of the Waikato many years ago (?).  Mostly open sheds for storing supers would  be built with a slatted floor (and mesh for the mice!), so that the air flow would always be there.

With the prevalence and availability of freezing units now, I'm not sure sure of the need for this level of activity - freezing wax moths is, IMHO, a much better way to go...

 

Nick

Tauranga

In a stack, the wax moth larvae will populate and occupy the top boxes in preference to anything below . They generate their own heat and like it hot , and hot air rises . 

I’d be certain they enter from below as this is how they enter beehives . 

I have not tested the theory of having a flow of air through a stack of supers .

Wax moths are extremely persistent and will lay eggs through the smallest of gaps into supers . My honey supers are always well infested with grubs as soon as they come back from the extractor , so it’s a race to freeze them before they do too much damage . 

Ive found storing supers , wrapped, through the following summer after harvest , a bit unsuccessful . As soon as the wrap goes loose or deteriorates a bit , they larvae are back in there . 

Edited by M4tt
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they will even lay on the outside of the boxes and the larvae will eat there way into the box.

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I had my honey supers stored in a 20 foot insulated container. A full container holds approx 640 3/4 depths. Only last year I discovered an infestation of wax moth, probably due to a non-season last year so the supers didn't go out. In autumn I removed all the supers and sent 200 away for rendering down, and the remainder I stacked on wooden pallets outside. That is where all the supers still are, open to the weather all winter, spring and into summer. When I stacked them on the pallets I spaced out the 8 frames as if they were being put on the hives thus making it impossible for the grubs to move from frame to frame. The wind blows through them, it has rained, snowed and hailed onto the exposed supers. The top two supers of each stack have been bleached by the sun and all burr comb has fallen off the most exposed frames. The wax moth is DEAD! 

Now I'm trying to sell all my hives and beekeeping equipment to retire from the business. I'm still tossing up whether to render down the remaining 300 odd supers, hardly worth it for the wax and nobody wants to buy second hand empty honey supers. Any ideas??

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They make great firewood ......   but seriously, maybe render the wax from the combs and chop for kindling, parrafin wax the boxes and hot paint and try and sell .... boxes also make great retro furniture.

Of course , if you are selling bees, then the boxes go with the bees and no issue.

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I don't know if it would be economic but having sound boxes paraffin dipped (to ensure no AFB) may make them saleable?

Ahh gazumped by the above while typing!

Agreed @jamesc

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Haha .... who took  a lot of our old bee boxes one year ...... he was building a "Bach" down in Wanaka and built the kitchen units from the boxes. It featured in a home and garden magazine and looked awesome ..... if you like bee boxes.

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