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Autumn feeding strategy

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23 hours ago, mischief said:

And we wonder why we have such a problem with AFB- which according to our local expert- its a stress and or beek related disease.

The problem is with you lot....Greed.

 

your post makes no sense. We have a problem with AFB due to #### beekeepers. Your local expert talking stress has almost certainly been taken out of context or mis-interpreted (by you)

 

how is your varroa management going these days?

Edited by tommy dave
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13 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Historically , before all this overstocking , would beeks have assessed some places  as not going to produce and not used those sites that year .

I might be corrected, but my impression is that historically (i.e. pre manuka boom) there wasn't much hive mobility other than pollination work. Hives stayed in production sites, occasionally they didn't produce much.

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1 hour ago, tommy dave said:

I might be corrected, but my impression is that historically (i.e. pre manuka boom)  much hive mobility other than pollination work. Hives stayed in production sites, occasionally they didn't produce much.

The hives are moved into my area after pollination .

Hives have been moved in and out of golden bay for years.

I remember discussions about whether it was worth putting hives in areas because this season it looked like there would be too much manuka honey .

In times past beeks did all they could to avoid supers full on manuka .

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Historically some areas had pretty sedentary hives  that were seldom moved  but there were also vast numbers of hives shifted for pollination and also shifted out of the high country for the winter and back for the summer. Some of those hives were moved pretty long distances to. There were  even a few trials moving hives with helicopters for clover pollination. Hives were also occasionally moved to get away from adverse seasonal conditions  such as too much or too little rain but generally that was a waste of time.

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On 8/01/2019 at 10:22 PM, tommy dave said:

your post makes no sense. We have a problem with AFB due to #### beekeepers. Your local expert talking stress has almost certainly been taken out of context or mis-interpreted (by you)

 

how is your varroa management going these days?

My Varroa management?  

According to the bees, very well.

Bounced back from the brink to having almost a full house.

I suppose, as it is a 30 frame long hive with a mix of 29 narrow frames and normal ones and still room for at least another 4-5, they are doing really well.

Time, as always will tell.

 

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On 8/01/2019 at 7:28 AM, Alastair said:

Some of us learn slower than others i guess, Mischief. I can remember when you were outraged people would treat their hives for varroa mites. We were all "quite mad", remember? Then reality hit and you found for yourself there are reasons people do things. ?

No Alistair and shame on you for posting that.

Go back and read it again.

What I said and have been saying is that after all this time there should no longer be such a problem as Varroa and that I felt there was something very wrong with having to treat any lifeform JUST to keep it alive.

 

Thee are many people who categorically state that they do not treat and have not for some time- Auntie Google is your friend too.

If they can get things right in their location, so can we.

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18 minutes ago, mischief said:

No Alistair and shame on you for posting that.

Go back and read it again.

What I said and have been saying is that after all this time there should no longer be such a problem as Varroa and that I felt there was something very wrong with having to treat any lifeform JUST to keep it alive.

 

Thee are many people who categorically state that they do not treat and have not for some time- Auntie Google is your friend too.

If they can get things right in their location, so can we.

Which locations have been most sucessfull .

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On 6/01/2019 at 12:12 AM, Alastair said:

 

No there are others like you.

 

How much honey did your bees get for you last season? Oh. None? Really?

 

Sorry, just shaking my head in disbelief...... Am I the only one who thinks that is crazy?

Once again Alistair, you shoot yourself in the foot.

I said I did not take any off them in their first year....remember that one- alot of newbies lost their hive/s during the summer dearth.

To remind you, I got the hive on the 1st of Jan 2017, just in time for the dearth.

 

I was not one of those who said they got no honey from their hives last season.

On the contrary, My Xmas presents to family, friends and my new neighbour,  was comb honey and jarred chunk honey.

 

My small newbie hive gave me 7 seriously fat frames (deeps) harvested before Xmas, along with the 5 frames that went into the freezer to make room in the hive. Those came out in Jan/feb.

Along with the four frames that they didnt use over winter and yes, probably cos I didnt manage them properly over that time frame,but.....guess what?... Still alive and going strong...two years and zero loses.

 

This year, nope, I took nothing. I could have taken 4 but havent, I will probably have to remove some to make room between now and winter, but they will have to go in the freezer.

 

 

 

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Hmmm, this has a smell of trolling .....

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@mischief have you been able to keep your hives healthy for 2 yrs with no treatment .

How have you managed that ?

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2 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

@mischief have you been able to keep your hives healthy for 2 yrs with no treatment .

How have you managed that ?

I havent  (and sorry if i am sounding exasperated).

Year one I religiously treated with FGMO every two weeks over summer and every month over winter.

Along came spring and I had a bad case of DWV, Alistair, on another forum told me to get apivar, I got Apilife not realising that it was not the same thing.

Result was, they just took off, almost immediately, like within a week.

I queried that cos i could not see how it could have made such a huge difference in such a short space of time and still dont understand this.

I did continue with the FGMO over summer but with the wintergreen oil added and in late summer did put in Apilife again but this time on the solid bottom board  because I forgot to put it in when I was inspecting the hive.

 

I forgot because they were so hostile, I was shaking by the time I finished up and no I didnt drop anything, squish anyone (that I know of), smoker worked fine.

I had to go back in two weeks later- cos I had 2 frames touching at the bottom and they were nice as pie again.

I assume now that it was because they had superseded their Queen and either she wasnt laying or had only just started, so no open brood.

 

This last winter, I made a wrong choice in leaving them with just the strips under the hive and doing the odd OAV over winter with the result that although things looked okay at the entrance, they werent doing well.

Dan came over to help me out and put in an Apivar strip with a mite drop of 180 over the next week and pretty much nothing since then even with OAV treatments being done.

 

So how bad was it? two inches of sad looking brood on each side of one seam.

How is it now? as I said, 29 frames, not all fully built out but also with a couple of really fat comb.

Why do I let them do the fat comb- cos I dont have ready built out frames of comb to pop in and when I see there may be a problem with the Queen having nowhere to lay, i widen the spacing which makes the bees move the nectar to those frames that they also fatten to get the bee space they love so much.

 

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Oh, my mistake Mischief i didn't know you had taken honey from the hive, my apologies. 

 

As per your request I would read your "quite mad" post again, but no idea how to find it, got a link? I do recall it was just before you discovered your hive was nearly dead and got help to treat it, after which it recovered. And now you have harvested honey.

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