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Borage

Irish heather honey

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https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/farming/106869227/could-irish-honey-rival-our-own-liquid-gold

"Could Irish honey rival our own liquid gold?"

Sep 06, 2018

"However, a study by scientists from Dublin City University and Trinity College Dublin suggests Irish heather honey could provide the same health boost. 

The researchers compared 131 Irish honey samples and found heather honey contained the highest levels of powerful antioxidants called phenolic compounds, similar to the levels found in mānuka honey."

"But the claims didn't wash with John Rawcliffe, head of the Unique Manuka Factor Honey Association, which represents New Zealand manuka honey producers.

"There are always going to be pretenders and this is just the latest," he said.

"The Scots have tried it, the Welsh have tried it and so have the English – they've all tried to measure their honey up against mānuka but they're not measuring the same thing."

Rawcliffe said the antioxidant content and hydrogen peroxide activity assessed in other studies were only part of the reason for mānuka honey's effectiveness in some health applications.
"There are so many other factors unique to mānuka honey.  Research has shown it has 2300 unique markers over and above even any other New Zealand honey," he said."

 

https://www.dcu.ie/news/news/2018/Aug/Irish-heather-honey-buzzing-health-benefits-comparable-Manuka-honey.shtml-0

"A research team from Dublin City University and Trinity College Dublin has found that Irish heather honey is quite literally buzzing with health benefits.

The findings showed that there was a similar overall presence of powerful antioxidants called phenolic compounds in Irish heather honey as in Manuka honey. These antioxidant compounds help to prevent damage occurring in the cells of the body and are important for health and well-being.

Researchers also found that multi-floral honeys produced by urban bees had a greater level of antioxidant phenolic compounds than their rural counterparts - a finding possibly attributed to the flower diversity and abundance surrounding hives.

The findings are published in the prestigious journal, Food Chemistry."

 

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/irish-honey-among-world-s-healthiest-study-finds-1.3615937

"Irish honey among world’s healthiest, study finds"

Sep 03, 2018

"The Irish research found a similar overall presence of powerful antioxidants called phenolic compounds in Irish heather honey as has been found in manuka honey."

 

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.08.035

Food Chemistry

Volume 272, 30 January 2019, Pages 66-75

"Physicochemical properties and phenolic content of honey from different floral origins and from rural versus urban landscapes

SaorlaKavanaghaJessicaGunnooaThayseMarques PassosbJane C.StoutcBlánaidWhitea"

 

2013 NZ news item on Scottish Heather Honey:

http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/farming/agribusiness/9246003/Heather-honey-claims-doubted

"Heather honey claims doubted."

Oct 04, 2013

 

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@Borage I do not doubt for a minute that heather honey could rival manuka for health benefits.

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6 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

@Borage I do not doubt for a minute that heather honey could rival manuka for health benefits.

Even for topical application ?

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11 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Even for topical application ?

Maybe .

I wonder if anyone will ever do a side by side trial of dark honeys that have used traditionaly for healing.

Like thyme,  olmo , Heather Etc 

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6 hours ago, Adam O'Sullivan said:

I'm from Ireland, and good luck to my countrymen getting a decent flow with the Irish weather.

The same could be said for manuka in the unpredictable NZ weather.

What did give a reliable flow in ireland.?0

Edited by kaihoka

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It appears that there are a several challenges for beeks trying to get a good harvest from the heather moors.

 

Bee Culture 

Feb 22, 2016

Scotland’s Legendary Heather Moors

https://www.beeculture.com/scotlands-legendary-heather-moors/

 

"Heather honey has an amber color and settles naturally, like the honey above, to give a creamy soft caramel consistency. It has a strong aroma and tastes like the heady scent of the flower with a hint of delicate cinnamon. It is thixotropic, which means that it normally has a jelly-like consistency and only becomes liquefied through agitation. It later returns slowly to a jelly-like state. Because of this idiosyncratic property, it must be pressed from the combs in a special and expensive heather press, or the cells must be agitated by needles before centrifugal extraction. Many beekeepers avoid these complications by giving the bees starter strips of thin beeswax foundation and selling the honey as cut comb."

"You can always tell heather honey by the air bubbles resulting from it being thixotropic: they can be up to 2mm in diameter in a pure sample. The protein content of up to 1.86% is higher than in most other honeys (0.2%) delaying crystallisation for months. The water content (up to 23%) is also markedly higher than other British honeys making it more susceptible to fermentation. One local beekeeper friend was dismayed to find his precious bucket of extracted Ling heather heaving and frothing when he removed the lid some months later."

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Heather (Calluna vulgaris) is an invasive species in NZ and Australia.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calluna

Invasive species

"The plant was introduced to New Zealand and has become an invasive weed in some areas, notably the Tongariro National Park in the North Island and the Wilderness Reserve (Te Anau) in the South Island, overgrowing native plants. Heather beetles have been released to stop the heather, with preliminary trials successful to date."

 

https://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/places-to-go/central-north-island/places/tongariro-national-park/about-tongariro-national-park/pests-and-weeds/

"Heather (Calluna vulgaris)

Originally planted by one of the early park wardens around 1910, heather was introduced to the area as a food source for pheasant and grouse which were to be introduced to Tongariro National Park as gamebirds. Public outrage stopped the birds' introduction in the park, although they were released in neighbouring areas. The birds did not survive the harsh climatic conditions of the Tongariro area, but unfortunately the heather did. It spread throughout the tussock country, smothering and pushing out the red tussock."

"Measures to control heather

Heather is difficult and expensive to control. The plant is so successful in this area that most control methods are inadequate. Pulling out the plants generally loosens the soil and releases lots of other seeds, ensuring that heather is usually the first thing to grow back. If you spray heather, large areas of vegetation are killed, including desirable native species.

At present a form of biological control is being attempted in the form of the heather beetle (Lochmaea suturalis). This beetle is from Scotland and feeds only on heather. To be sure of this, there have to be many tests and trials to ensure that the beetle will not feed on any of our native plants. In 1996, the heather beetle was released on two sites in Tongariro National Park. It will not get rid of the heather all together, but hopefully it will slow its spread and allow the native species to regenerate with less competition."

 

https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive/weeds/publications/guidelines/alert/pubs/c-vulgaris.pdf

"C. vulgaris has been recorded as a weed in many overseas regions, including the high country of New Zealand where it covers an area of over 6000 square km. It is closely related to several other species that are weeds in Australia, including bell heather (Erica cinerea) and Spanish heath (Erica lusitanica). The latter is an invasive weed near Melbourne, Sydney and Canberra and has a very similar growth pattern to C. vulgaris, although Spanish heath is better adapted to drier conditions."

 

https://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0015/20463/Heather_Beetle.pdf

HEATHER BEETLE 

Lochmaea suturalis 
The history of heather beetles in New Zealand
"Heather was planted in Tongariro National Park (TNP) in 1912 to provide food and cover for introduced grouse. While grouse failed to establish, heather thrived and has now invaded more than 50 0000 ha of the Central Plateau, North Island."
"Heather beetles are native to north-west Europe where large scale outbreaks can devastate heather. They were first imported from the UK by Landcare Research in 1992 and were released into TNP in 1996 after being cleared of a protozoan parasite. Beetle populations have been slow to establish here and poor climatematching, genetic bottlenecking and low foliar nitrogen levels appear to be contributing factors. A few large-scale outbreaks have severely damaged about 100 ha of heather at high altitude sites on the Central Plateau 10 years after the beetles were released."

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6 hours ago, kaihoka said:

The same could be said for manuka in the unpredictable NZ weather.

What did give a reliable flow in ireland.?0

I didn’t keep bees in Ireland. Not uncommon to go through summer there and get a couple of weeks of sun, that’s all. I would imagine there wouldn’t be many flows at all

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2 hours ago, Adam O'Sullivan said:

 WoI didn’t keep bees in Ireland. Not uncommon to go through summer there and get a couple of weeks of sun, that’s all. I would imagine there wouldn’t be many flows at all

Why did humans ever go live there i Wonder .

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On 26/12/2018 at 4:10 PM, kaihoka said:

Why did humans ever go live there i Wonder .

Ive wondered this about Wellington.

On a nice day it’s excellent, but on a bad one  there are about 9 different environmental factors actively trying to kill you.

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My father-in-law from Tullamore was telling me about this while they were here for Christmas. His area in the Midlands is where the Heather grows very well and the honey is produced.

He is looking at getting back into having a few hives - he had some pre-varroa and was very interested looking into my hives with me.

Sent them off with plenty of honey!

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On 26/12/2018 at 4:10 PM, kaihoka said:

Why did humans ever go live there i Wonder .

hence the expression ...... Irish

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