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Guest Cece

Swarming bees - only in the morning?

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Guest Cece

Hi,

 

weve just moved into a newly built home in a sub division. Our house backs into a reserve where there is an adundance of Manuka trees.

Every morning at about 5 I can here all the birds chirping away, and then from about 5:30 it goes quiet and I can hear bees swarming.

 

I have had a look outside and can’t see specifically where it’s coming from, but they are loud! Just wondered what this could be and if it’s anything I should be worried about / take measures to ensure they don’t take up a home permanently 

 

Would love to hear any info or advice anyone can give!

 

thanks in advance and sorry about my noviceness on the subject!

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In your wall or ceiling?

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There'll be an apiary or two somewhere in the area and you're hearing flying/foraging bees. Nothing to worry about.

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Bees are wonderful creatures so don’t be worried about their presence, it will be just while the plants on the reserve are in blossom. If you don’t squash them they don’t get upset or worried. Bees appreciate calm slow movements by humans ( think tai chi ).  If you swat at them or wave your arms around and run away, they don’t like that at all. ‘The Buzz about Bees’ is a great book explaining bee behaviour. There’s a reason people love keeping bees, together as a colony bees are called a super organism.

 

I’m a bit of a softy and on a cold morning I have been known to put a drop of sugar water or honey on a finger and place that in front of a tired cold bee or bumble bee and watch it drink, revive and fly away home.

 

Your lovely bees will be concentrating on gathering nectar and pollen on the reserve. So their tummies are full of nectar and they will be happy and calm, and solely focused on the flowers, not you.


In fact the best thing you can do for bees is plant flowers that provide food for them. Bees can fly several kilometres to their food sources and there are times of the year when they struggle to find food. The bees you hear will be flying from an apiary near the reserve. December -January bees have plenty of food plants to forage on. They carry the nectar back to the hive and pass it from bee to bee and then put it in a cell in the honey comb. As they pass the nectar on, amino acids as are added to the nectar. They evaporate the remaining water content away until they have a concentrated nutritious nectar and amino acid mixture -honey. One bee makes one drop of honey in its entire lifetime. It’s all a little awe inspiring. 

 

We have a reserve next to us with tall pohutukawas and other native tree that bees gather food from. The air is filled with the buzz of busy bees. You might just miss their buzz once the manuka stops flowering.

 

The best thing you can do is to guide the bees to where you want them -on the edges of your property in the flower garden. Wear shoes or flips flops when walking on your lawn, keep your lawn where you walk mowed so there are no flowers, plant bee flowers on your borders like ( pear, apple, malus, prunus sp, artichokes, squash, melons, cucumbers, rosemary, lavender, poppies, roses, five finger, echium etc) 

 

So a warm welcome guest cece to the NZ bee forum. If you become interested in plants for bees, bee behaviour and biology don’t hesitate to ask the forum about the best websites to visit and books to read. 

701B1367-82EC-4654-8CE4-8AD06B104C6D.jpeg

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20 minutes ago, GoED said:

Bees are wonderful creatures so don’t be worried about their presence, it will be just while the plants on the reserve are in blossom. If you don’t squash them they don’t get upset or worried. Bees appreciate calm slow movements by humans ( think tai chi ).  If you swat at them or wave your arms around and run away, they don’t like that at all. ‘The Buzz about Bees’ is a great book explaining bee behaviour. There’s a reason people love keeping bees, together as a colony bees are called a super organism.

 

I’m a bit of a softy and on a cold morning I have been known to put a drop of sugar water or honey on a finger and place that in front of a tired cold bee or bumble bee and watch it drink, revive and fly away home.

 

Your lovely bees will be concentrating on gathering nectar and pollen on the reserve. So their tummies are full of nectar and they will be happy and calm, and solely focused on the flowers, not you.


In fact the best thing you can do for bees is plant flowers that provide food for them. Bees can fly several kilometres to their food sources and there are times of the year when they struggle to find food. The bees you hear will be flying from an apiary near the reserve. December -January bees have plenty of food plants to forage on. They carry the nectar back to the hive and pass it from bee to bee and then put it in a cell in the honey comb. As they pass the nectar on, amino acids as are added to the nectar. They evaporate the remaining water content away until they have a concentrated nutritious nectar and amino acid mixture -honey. One bee makes one drop of honey in its entire lifetime. It’s all a little awe inspiring. 

 

We have a reserve next to us with tall pohutukawas and other native tree that bees gather food from. The air is filled with the buzz of busy bees. You might just miss their buzz once the manuka stops flowering.

 

The best thing you can do is to guide the bees to where you want them -on the edges of your property in the flower garden. Wear shoes or flips flops when walking on your lawn, keep your lawn where you walk mowed so there are no flowers, plant bee flowers on your borders like ( pear, apple, malus, prunus sp, artichokes, squash, melons, cucumbers, rosemary, lavender, poppies, roses, five finger, echium etc) 

 

So a warm welcome guest cece to the NZ bee forum. If you become interested in plants for bees, bee behaviour and biology don’t hesitate to ask the forum about the best websites to visit and books to read. 

 

 

Thank you GoEd!

 

Your information has been really helpful. We chose that spot specifically to be near the birds and the bees! I was mostly worried that we may have disturbed something nearby, but sounds like that's not the case.

 

We also have a lot of garden bordering our backyard, so far it's just mulched, with the hope of planting a great garden full of natives and bee friendly plants. I would be very keen to hear more about what I can do to create the best environment for them, any advice or direction would be so appreciated (although what you have provided already has been awesome). 

 

Thanks again 

Cece

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2 hours ago, cece said:

 

 

Thank you GoEd!

 

Your information has been really helpful. We chose that spot specifically to be near the birds and the bees! I was mostly worried that we may have disturbed something nearby, but sounds like that's not the case.

 

We also have a lot of garden bordering our backyard, so far it's just mulched, with the hope of planting a great garden full of natives and bee friendly plants. I would be very keen to hear more about what I can do to create the best environment for them, any advice or direction would be so appreciated (although what you have provided already has been awesome). 

 

Thanks again 

Cece

Cece have a look at the Trees for Bees website when you are ready. Have a lovely time settling into your wonderful new property. The Plants and blossoms forum is a great place to find out about plants that might suit your soil and micro climate. Do you have clay loam or sand or a mixture. Are you coastal or inland north or south, the specifics as you know will influence what grows best. Happy 2019. 

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PS alyssum is great for all your other tiny beneficial insects, tiny flowers for tiny mouthparts. Those tiny predator  insects deal to your pest insects eyeing up your garden vegetables ...( in California they interplant organic romaine lettuce crops with alyssum on a commercial scale)

Edited by GoED

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18 hours ago, GoED said:

Cece have a look at the Trees for Bees website when you are ready. Have a lovely time settling into your wonderful new property. The Plants and blossoms forum is a great place to find out about plants that might suit your soil and micro climate. Do you have clay loam or sand or a mixture. Are you coastal or inland north or south, the specifics as you know will influence what grows best. Happy 2019. 

 

Thanks for the advice. The soil isn't the best unfortunately, a lot of clay I believe. We have had a section on one part top soiled with a lot of compost, ready for planting a vege garden, the other perimeter area is aiming for big climbers, roses, flowers trees etc - we have quite a big retaining wall and fence. We are about 500m or so from an inlet around the corner so nice and sheltered. I will take a look at the forum you have suggested to get a bit of an idea. I am a complete novice as never really had my own little piece of land, but looking forward to learning! 

 

I absolutely LOVE alyssum so will absolutely plant them, that's some gold advice thank you.

 

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