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Herbicide contamination

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2 hours ago, tudor said:

All very well, but has this data been subjected to peer review and published ?

If not, it's just another anecdote. 

 

Too true but I heeded the warning, it was a shame that more wasn't said about it but the clinician concerned would often be subject to derogatory comments by some of his colleagues about just being a technician.  In any event I do my best to stay away from the stuff and anything else that kills cells, plants or otherwise.  Makes for tough gardening but.

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1 hour ago, BJC said:

 t was a shame that mor e wasn't said about it but the clinician concerned would often be subject to derogatory comments by some of his colleagues about just being a technician.  In any event I do my best to stay away from the stuff and anything else that kills cells, plants or otherwise.  Makes for tough gardening but.

I used to be more rigid about not using chemicals .

When i Was young i Would use a grubber .

Now i Am Old i Am more inclined to spray 

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21 hours ago, Alastair said:

Agreed M4tt. The "science" about how bad glyphosate is supposed to be is mostly pretty dodge. Or at least by the time it gets run through the Chinese whisper machine and ends up on internet forums, it is pretty dodge. 

 

5 hours ago, Ali said:

regarding Glyphosate then why is Europe phasing it's use out???

Happily the thread is adding to a fine "pretty dodge" tradition. It reminds me of the Six Wise Men of Hindustan parable.

Why the phase-out? Politics. If you want the longer answer with holiday reading for homework start a new thread.

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On 20/12/2018 at 9:16 PM, Bighands said:

There is a product out there that uses pine needles but I cannot remember the name of it Fairly expensive but it is natural so better than Roundup

I think its called Interceptor.

It does work, but I thought it really stunk, so i didnt buy any more.....just hand weed.

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1 hour ago, mischief said:

I think its called Interceptor.

It does work, but I thought it really stunk, so i didnt buy any more.....just hand weed.

It really stinks and it just burns the leaves of summer grasses , which have such a prolific root system , the plant carries on growing.

I tried it in the veg garden thinking it was the best thing ever , but it wasn’t . 

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On 20/12/2018 at 9:45 AM, Alastair said:

So, anyone know where I could get a sample tested?

 

Hi Alistair, we definitely test for glyphosate at Analytica. If you want to give me a call on 07 444 5475 or flick me an email at kate.robertson@analytica.co.nz I can talk you through pricing, TATs and sample volume. You can also find more info here: https://analytica.co.nz/Tests/Honey-Testing/Glyphosate 

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We gave up using many chemicals on the farm quite a few years ago. Mainly because they were so expensive. The same with super phosphate and Nitrogen, prefering to stick with lime and recently seaweed from Agrisea.

Today we cut paddocks for baleage .  I was amazed and impressed at the variety of  grasses and herbs we are putting in to the baleage for winter feed. Lotus Sativa, whiteclover , red clover, plantain, timothy, rye, dock and the odd thistle.  Variety is the spice.

 

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Thanks for that Kate. I am in the process of taking honey off the hives now. Once I got a few samples from apiaries where glyphosate has been used the most, I'll send some to you, it would just be interesting to know. IE, wether I would need to change my practises, or not.

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

We gave up using many chemicals on the farm quite a few years ago. Mainly because they were so expensive. The same with super phosphate and Nitrogen, prefering to stick with lime and recently seaweed from Agrisea.

Today we cut paddocks for baleage .  I was amazed and impressed at the variety of  grasses and herbs we are putting in to the baleage for winter feed. Lotus Sativa, whiteclover , red clover, plantain, timothy, rye, dock and the odd thistle.  Variety is the spice.

 

Apparently there is enough phosphate in NZ soils for 50, yrs .

When super phos is dumped on only a small percentage becomes available the bulk is locked up into an unuseable compound with iron and aluminium .

Soil bacteria can unlock it if you have a living soil 

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2 hours ago, Alastair said:

Thanks for that Kate. I am in the process of taking honey off the hives now. Once I got a few samples from apiaries where glyphosate has been used the most, I'll send some to you, it would just be interesting to know. IE, wether I would need to change my practises, or not.

We have it show up in honey from summer high country sites where we don’t spray at all .. bees get shifted in.. punch the crop, harvested and shifted out. 

The concern in my eyes is what’s been sprayed inside the forage circle and over so many years... 

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Glyphosate does not kill legumes , lotus clover , maybe with  regular spraying  it builds up in the plant tissue .

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On 21/12/2018 at 11:25 AM, Ali said:

I wonder how much was connected to 24D, 245T etc? The Dioxin debate? We used to aerial spray it in pretty large volumes back in the day (40yrs back). Stinking, skin burning stuff that they said was safe to drink too!

 

 

I grew up on an apple orchard our water came from our roof and our house was slap bang in the middle of the orchard 

I can still remember the smell and taste of the spray as it wafted over us from neighbouring orchards as we walked up the road to the school bus

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What we used to do! If a spray nozzle became blocked we would leave the spray pump and prop running and walk into the pattern/slipstream to the trailing edge of the wing (yes on the ground!) and spin the nozzle off/on to clear it and wander back out of the way again! It saved time. At the end of the day it took about an hour in the shower to partially get rid of the stink and soothe the skin.

Avgas, 245T, oh and back then cigarette smoke. What a mix! Amazing what the body can survive.

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1 hour ago, Ali said:

What we uswaad to do! If a ften  no  zzle became blocked  we would leave the spray pump and prop rutobaccoand walk into the pattern/slipstream to the trailing edge of the wing (yes on the ground!) and spin the nozzle off/on to clear it and wander back out of the way again! It saved time. At the end of the day it took about an hour in the shower to partially get rid of the stink and soothe the skin.

Avgas, 245T, oh and back then cigarette smoke. What a mix! Amazing what the body can survive.

Can i Ask how old you are .

I grew up on an orchard and i Often wonder how the chemicals i Was exposed to will effect me as i Age.

I am 63 now so things will show up soon .

So far the thing all my friends who died in their 50s had in commmon was tabacco and alcohol

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I used to love the smell of DDT and sprinkled it liberally in my bed as I used to sleep with our cat and her fleas. I might have got it all out of my system breastfeeding the kids? I’ve used all sorts of sprays over the years without any protection but stopped the lot about 10 Years back. No untoward signs so far I’m 72

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Do your kids get fleas ? :14_relaxed:

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You are not too unusual Oma. A whole generation of Americans did this. 

 

Years ago bedbugs were constant night time companions in many American bedrooms, until the invention of DDT. This wonderful product was then bought up large by housewives and others, and used so liberally that bed bugs were completely exterminated in North America. The memory of them vanished from the public knowledge base other than the popular saying sleep tight don't let the ........ Then a few decades ago with increasing tourism and overseas travel they were re introduced, this time in resistant versions that are harder to get rid of.

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9 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Can i Ask how old you are .

Nah you can't! ? But....seen you already have.....like you @kaihokaI'm just a tad past youth ....we did our schooling (or didn't) in the same era.

The only thing I'm aware of that popped up along the way was a nasty reaction to epoxy type chemicals. 

Most of the fellas didn't survive long enough to find out if there was any nasties coming their way other than a steep hillside......they were all well and truly under 50.

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