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Adam Boot

Honey Price Collapse

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1 hour ago, frazzledfozzle said:

Mono Manuka honey is harder to sell to packers with more than a few drums unsold  

is there any truth to this ?

Ahaa ! Now we have mono-manuka as well as manuka.  The question "What is manuka ? " has been asked. What is mono - manuka ?

Edited by yesbut

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7 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Ahaa ! Now we have mono-manuka as well as manuka.  The question "What is manuka ? " has been asked. What is mono - manuka ?

 

Haha well don’t ask me because I have no clue !

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On 18/01/2019 at 11:48 AM, frazzledfozzle said:

Mono Manuka honey is harder to sell to packers with more than a few drums unsold  

is there any truth to this ?

No

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3 hours ago, Adam Boot said:

No

 

Good to hear,

has the price come down ? 

 

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13 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

Good to hear,

has the price come down ? 

 

Not at this stage. We are selective though. 

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I was in the four square today doing a bit of hunting.  ...... and noticed honey dew ranging from $29/kg to $36/kg .....

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So James are you getting that price in your shop? You have done the right thing selling it yourself but you have to set the price you want for it.

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Dew as a stand alone will be a slow seller. There are probably packers still getting rid of stock they paid a lot of money for. It will hold it's value till someone is prepared to let it go for less.

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24 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Dew as a stand alone will be a slow seller. There are probably packers still getting rid of stock they paid a lot of money for. It will hold it's value till someone is prepared to let it go for less.

Whenever there is a real or perceived price drop buyers become nervous and rightly so. You can pay $10 a kilo and suddenly someone is selling the same product for half the price you paid for it. When honey prices are really high a lot of packers actually make no margin at all. If prices crash they can be left holding the baby.

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10 hours ago, Don Mac said:

Just a mon pause and reflect on BeeTasmaniann Tasmainia.

The bush fires have hit hives as well as their Leatherwood trees - 100 yewasrs tp replace this crop.

htt ps://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-05/tasmanian-bushfires-burn-leatherwood-in-blow-to-honey-industry/10776606 

 

A local beek who now lives in my area spent years bee keeping in the tasmainia Leatherwood .

He said he let them requeen themselves each year and he never looked in the broodnest .

The leatherwood was really reliable .

Its a terrible thing , i Was reading today an article in the gaurdian about the devastion To the unique flora of SW tasmania By these fires.

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25 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

A local beek who now lives in my area spent years bee keeping in the tasmainia Leatherwood .

He said he let them requeen themselves each year and he never looked in the broodnest .

The leatherwood was really reliable .

Its a terrible thing , i Was reading today an article in the gaurdian about the devastion To the unique flora of SW tasmania By these fires.

Tasmania is an interesting place

They have the largest fresh water crayfish in the world weighing in at 10lbs mature

Image result for tasmanian freshwater crayfish

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1 hour ago, Philbee said:

Tasmania is an interesting place

They have the largest fresh water crayfish in the world weighing in at 10lbs mature

Image result for tasmanian freshwater crayfish

I wonder if it is edible at that size .

Generally the big ones are put back  In NZ because it is not a commercial Size.

My tasmanian friend got a shock when he tried bee keeping in NZ the way he had done it in aussie .

His hives died .

He gave up and gave me all the new gear he had made , boxes frames etc.

He is starting again this season . With more nucs 

I have A nuc or two for him .

 

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On 4/12/2018 at 7:22 AM, kaihoka said:

@Jay internationally it is dark strong honeys that have been used medically. 

Like thyme and manuka and ulmo honey .

We only hear about the wonderfull properties of manuka but some other honeys are just as good .

I have just read a paper on using ulmo honey and ascorbic acid to heal up ulcers.

The publicity given manuka will be taken advantage of to promote these honeys medically , now that the public sees honey as a medicine.

It is a shame for the manuka honey industry  who will no longer have the field to themselves .

But with the current issues with antibiotics its good for humanity .

I've heard that Honeydew falls somewhere in that category too?

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On 5/12/2018 at 7:20 PM, MackAp said:

@Adam Boot You mention you were looking for good quality Manuka to keep up with demand? I have 9 tonne UMF 15+, passes all MPI standards, low C4. Let me know if you are interested. Just organising another round of tests to get up to date NPA etc.

 

Send me an email with the specs & test results of your UMF 15+ Manuka we may be interested in some. manuka at forestgoldhoney dot kiwi

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On 7/12/2018 at 2:34 PM, flash4cash said:

Interesting I thought they would collect sales at he till.  I know they track each sale in each store per week. 

 

It may not come under export data as i understand they break it down to 2/3 cans per shipment and send it in.  This way there get around the system and they do not have to pay import duties. 

Probably under the 1kg limit for most countries so they can get away with exporting it as a personal item or gift.

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On 7/12/2018 at 3:56 PM, Bron said:

Thanks for that @Emissary, so the figures are actually a guesstimate! :IMG_0385:

Essentially no one knows how much honey is produced in NZ.

 

 

 

 

They honestly have no idea!!!!!! The only thing they know for certain is how much is exported. Other than this it is just a survey. I see some people reporting 30kg per hive average and some as high as 90 or even 110kg (double queened) yet I know some beekeepers only get between 7 & 10kg. From what I'm seeing It depends somewhat on locality and the methodology of the beek. I've seen some beeks from the same reginal area have 38kg per hive and others with just 10 - 18kg so maybe it's methods or maybe it beeks chasing particular crops so they empty the supers before they move???? as an extractor you see a lot of variables across a wide range of beekeepers, regions, methods etc. until someone can get true totals and averages across the whole of the country the data is not worth much (in my opinion that is, for what it's worth).

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On 7/12/2018 at 10:45 PM, Philbee said:

We should be growing this stuff

 

It's a type of Borage family and seems to be good as a green manure crop. maybe we could convince

some farmers to grow it for our spring buildup! It seems like a lot of hives he's putting on just 125 acres!

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53 minutes ago, Chug said:

Send me an email with the specs & test results of your UMF 15+ Manuka we may be interested in some. manuka at forestgoldhoney dot kiwi

Allways

 

Send to adam.boot@midlands.co.nz

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At the end of the day we need to cut out the middle men. This year has been an absolute prick. 70+ hour weeks trying to make the core buisnesd work dont help the beehives much however I am optomistic about the future. I do a reasomable amount of direct sales for the strawberrys, the bulk of which I can sell honey alongside. Also, the regs for a facility that I can  prep and freeze seconds strawberrys is very close to the standard I need to extract and package honey.... So no middle men and before ya know it $12 per kg and we all win...

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13 hours ago, Kiwifruiter said:

At the end of the day we need to cut out the middle men. This year has been an absolute prick. 70+ hour weeks trying to make the core buisnesd work dont help the beehives much however I am optomistic about the future. I do a reasomable amount of direct sales for the strawberrys, the bulk of which I can sell honey alongside. Also, the regs for a facility that I can  prep and freeze seconds strawberrys is very close to the standard I need to extract and package honey.... So no middle men and before ya know it $12 per kg and we all win...

Great - Go for it. Don't forget the millions of $$ for your lab, bulk tanks, creaming, pumping, label, laser, metal detecting out weighing, sealing packing equipment. Don't forget your highly skilled technical production team. Don't forget your Halal, Kosher certification. Don't forget your quality certification, SQF standard if possible to supply the big guys. Good luck! Oh yes don't forget your multi million dollar marketing campaign, Your sales team and the work to create a brand that delivers on demand, value and growth? 

If you think a brand is a label on a jar you need to start again? 

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11 minutes ago, Adam Boot said:

Great - Go for it. Don't forget the millions of $$ for your lab, bulk tanks, creaming, pumping, label, laser, metal detecting out weighing, sealing packing equipment. Don't forget your highly skilled technical production team. Don't forget your Halal, Kosher certification. Don't forget your quality certification, SQF standard if possible to supply the big guys. Good luck! Oh yes don't forget your multi million dollar marketing campaign, Your sales team and the work to create a brand that delivers on demand, value and growth? 

If you think a brand is a label on a jar you need to start again? 

As the pressure comes on more and more beekeeper are going to do there own thing to survive. 

This is not the first time in our beekeeping history that beekeeper  will sell directly to the public to survive 

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21 hours ago, Chug said:

They honestly have no idea!!!!!! The only thing they know for certain is how much is exported. Other than this it is just a survey. I see some people reporting 30kg per hive average and some as high as 90 or even 110kg (double queened) yet I know some beekeepers only get between 7 & 10kg. From what I'm seeing It depends somewhat on locality and the methodology of the beek. I've seen some beeks from the same reginal area have 38kg per hive and others with just 10 - 18kg so maybe it's methods or maybe it beeks chasing particular crops so they empty the supers before they move???? as an extractor you see a lot of variables across a wide range of beekeepers, regions, methods etc. until someone can get true totals and averages across the whole of the country the data is not worth much (in my opinion that is, for what it's worth).

It may depend also on wether The beeks leave honey on for winter feed or they strip it all off and feed sugar .

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4 minutes ago, Beeman1 said:

As the pressure comes on more and more beekeeper are going to do there own thing to survive. 

This is not the first time in our beekeeping history that beekeeper  will sell directly to the public to survive 

I am all for it if you are confident that it will work. The majority of honey will remain sold through mainstream retail channels as will most products. 

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1 hour ago, Adam Boot said:

Great - Go for it. Don't forget the millions of $$ for your lab, bulk tanks, creaming, pumping, label, laser, metal detecting out weighing, sealing packing equipment. Don't forget your highly skilled technical production team. Don't forget your Halal, Kosher certification. Don't forget your quality certification, SQF standard if possible to supply the big guys. Good luck! Oh yes don't forget your multi million dollar marketing campaign, Your sales team and the work to create a brand that delivers on demand, value and growth? 

If you think a brand is a label on a jar you need to start again? 

 

Yet another unnecessary, sarcastic and belittling comment.

 

Just because that is how your company has gone about things does not mean it is either right or necessary.  

 

For a small operator getting honey into jars and a label on jar is likely to be the extent of their "cutting out the middleman" given their own resources and wherewithal.  Their sales effort may involve selling at a local market, some local selected retailers or even at the door.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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