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Honey Price Collapse

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13 hours ago, Alastair said:

How does that work Dennis? I guess their phone rings, so they pass the jobs on to other beekeepers, for a percentage perhaps?

 

BeekA has more pollination contracts than what hives they have so they broker  from BeekB hives, BeekB drops them off in dumpsite BeekA moves them in and out of orchard from dumpsite and looks after them while in there, at end of time BeekB picks up their hives and drops of invoice, or variations on this. There is a company been doing just that for years here which is who C broker to. BeekB dont get as much/hive as BeekA obviously as there is moving/feeding costs etc. 

 

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Thanks, makes sense.

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On 15/12/2018 at 5:02 PM, Adam Boot said:

It is not really an 'ha but' question. Simple fact is we demand higher standards of purity for our honey. We do not compromise and invest in testing to support this. I would like to think that most beekeeping in New Zealand is Superior in bee health, hygiene and sustainability. We are very selective when sourcing Manuka Honey for the PURITI brand as it has to exceed the MPI definition by a higher pass mark than all other brands. Obviously we then test to ensure glyphosate free. If our higher standards encourage a further lift in bee health, hygiene and sustainability then this is of course an additional bonus and something we encourage. 

 

Adam Boot if your after the highest quality honey for your brand then you had better give me a call........ you don't want to miss out on the best ?

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On 3/01/2019 at 7:13 PM, jamesc said:

Yes well ... I'm on a roll tonight ..... got my fuel card invoice from McKeowns tonight.   Filled up with diesel at Kumara that other week ..... 99c/lt. Filled up at Windwhistle a few days  later .... 95c/lt.    Caltex Darfield is almost $1.50/lt.   I tell yah ... things are looking up..... I could probably now afford to sell the crop for $3.30/kg. 

 

She James you must do some serious km's if $3.30 and a saving of 55c means you'll make a profit 

 

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On 3/01/2019 at 8:47 PM, Beeman1 said:

Did you know that midland  purchased clover from comvita last season  at $5 a kg

Then told there local beekeeper that they weren't  buying clover  you have find somewhere else to sell it 

 

 

 

The owner of midland did pass away last year......... perhaps it was the GM left that made such a decision. 

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3 hours ago, Jay said:

The owner of midland did pass away last year......... perhaps it was the GM left that made such a decision. 

Sadly one of the owners did pass away last year. Regardless. This decision was never made. It is no more than rumour. 

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3 hours ago, Jay said:

 

She James you must do some serious km's if $3.30 and a saving of 55c means you'll make a profit 

 

It all helps.... just like usin two squares of loo paper rather than three..... a 30% saving

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On 4/01/2019 at 4:54 PM, Jay said:

 

Adam Boot if your after the highest quality honey for your brand then you had better give me a call........ you don't want to miss out on the best ?

Hi Jay. What is your e-mail or you can contact me on adam.boot@midlands.co.nz

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Does anyone know how the multi floral Manuka prices are looking this season? Mgo 100 

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In case it interests anyone, this is at The Bin Inn. That’s a good price to sell clover at, but suspect the beekeeper doesn’t see much more than a tenth of that.

C27DFE74-C14F-48A4-ADF1-C99CAD24E30B.jpeg

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1 hour ago, cBank said:

In case it interests anyone, this is at The Bin Inn. That’s a good price to sell clover at, but suspect the beekeeper doesn’t see much more than a tenth of that.

C27DFE74-C14F-48A4-ADF1-C99CAD24E30B.jpeg

Same brands are cheaper in 500 gm packs at Pak n Slave, $9 .99 for clover.

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Just wondering, do the nylon honey gates meet NZ food standards? As for NP1 I guess?

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@Sailabee I have noticed that the prices in the bulk bins in supermarkets are often more expensive than the packaged goods too.

And not necessarily fresher.

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I understand that the price of honey needs to find it's true level in the market be it nationally or internationally. 

For the millions of tons of the blended honey that now sits in storehouses with next to no market to sell. I am indeed mindfull of the price of honey in the supermarkets presently. 

Food for thought, Ponder this.......

If this honey was presented as own product at a reasonable price compared to jams and spreads. (Yes I remember the day when peanut butter and Marmite were more expensive and jam was always made at home cause it was cheaper as compared to the bulked out fruitless product that is sold today at the lower end of the $ value) 

Take all this honey sitting in storage with no market, Brand it and put it on the shelf for the average kiwi family to afford then there would be a win win for all. 

The amount of trolleys one sees with jam and spreads and no honey.... there is definitely something wrong with this picture.

Yes Beeks are creating this void themselves and from what I see it will continue. 

Case in point. When a beek friend looses out his only Manuka site to another with a deal of 35% plus $ to place the hives on site on top!!! When questioned why such a deal? The reply was..... Wait for it...... We can afford to run at a loss!!!!! 

This is why the price of honey is unafordable to the general kiwi. 

Discussion is now aboutrefocus on the weekend markets and stalls. Jarring up honey and sell at the local market. Yea right.... With all the costs of jarring, wages, stall costs and the retail cost of the actual product. I watch these stall operators, maybe making a sale once every 1/2 hour, for a cost of no less than $12.00 per jar. People just walk on bye because they know they can purchase nutella, marmite and peanut butter or jam ( three of) for the price of 1 jar of honey. Is there any wonder why people are walking on bye.!!!

 

Manuka may have been the fat cow, however the high prices have created a cost for honey across the whole industry that the average Kiwi family now thinks a jar of honey is like gold and it is a treat when presented for toast at breakfast.

This I say as I did work the supermarkets back in the day, I was a chef and caterer in my previous life, I am a mum that brought up kids, worked the farm and now question the true value of what honey is produced for the local market. 

Ask children in the weekend market.....  Does your mum buy honey... some kids don't even know what honey is!!! 

This fits in with children growing up not knowing what it is to pat an animal!!!!

Come on there has to be some change to effect a fair deal for everyone and end result the sale of all this honey. 

Look at the local market  and take a good kick in the pants some operators, being greedy hurts the industry and the people as a whole.

Identify that the average family make up the greatest percentage of NZ population and the lower end of the income bracket and there leis an answer. 

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I sell honey at a farmers market and while I really enjoy it, it is not a way to get rich or to move vast quantities of honey. I try and keep my prices as low as possible and that has led to the odd person asking what's wrong with it. Packaging and marketing are expensive and as a rule of thumb I expect honey in the shop to be about twice the price that I have been paid for it and that's generally how it works out. As for bulk honey being more expensive than packed honey, no surprises there. I'm sure Arataki sell several thousand pots for every  bulk bucket fill.

Thanks to the drop in production caused by overstocking we have to make more per kilo than we used to, if we want to make a  living But I agree with silver hope, there is no need to Gouge out every last Penny and doing so is destroying our customer base..

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

It's interesting opening a honey shop 10k's up the end of a gravel road ..... people come to visit.  OMG ...... customers !

We had a family show up today un announced ..... they had brought their two wee little nieces up to see where honey was made and could they get some comb honey ?

Well, as a matter of fact yes ..... I had some comb honey in the shop and everyone was happy and fascinated !

 

You need some sort of honey subscription service - they will buy from you again if they can get it easily!

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6 minutes ago, cBank said:

 

You need some sort of honey subscription service - they will buy from you again if they can get it easily!

A honey card ..... buy five and th sixth is free ....?

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

A honey card ..... buy five and th sixth is free ....?

 

250g of honey a month, each a different different type?

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25 minutes ago, cBank said:

 

250g of honey a month, each a different different type?

I got that with my honey swap .:14_relaxed:

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

A honey card ..... buy five and th sixth is free ....?

there's probably something in that idea. I mean, if a cheese box subscription model can fly, then surely honey can...  (funded via pledgeme: https://www.cheesecartel.com/)

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12 hours ago, tommy dave said:

there's probably something in that idea. I mean, if a cheese box subscription model can fly, then surely honey can...  (funded via pledgeme: https://www.cheesecartel.com/)

 

$720 + GST for twelve months of cheese... that’s a Wallace cheese habit. 

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4 hours ago, Josh said:

 

$720 + GST for twelve months of cheese... that’s a Wallace cheese habit. 

Kim Jung  un spends that every month on cheese

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I signed up. Can not wait. Love cheese.

 

Of course it would work with honey 

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Mono Manuka honey is harder to sell to packers with more than a few drums unsold  

is there any truth to this ?

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