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Pollen Colour Chart

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@GoED photo of coastal flax . I think we may have a few varieties.

This was taken with a not very flash old phone .

IMG_20181209_071115.jpg

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6 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

@GoED photo of coastal flax . I think we may have a few varieties.

This was taken with a not very flash old phone .

IMG_20181209_071115.jpg

That’s very helpful Kaihoka, certainly looks like the pollen would be two tone deep salmon and orange once mixed and stowed in the corbicula. Great image! 

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Correction @kaihoka ...looked at the Trees for bees image again, yellow/orange ...

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33 minutes ago, GoED said:

Correction @kaihoka ...looked at the Trees for bees image again, yellow/orange ...

It could be that the yellow colour is where the pollen has brushed off the yellow stamen .

It looked just orange to the naked eye .

I will look at other flaxes .

Edited by kaihoka
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I have emailed them @Mummziewe’ll see what ideas they might throw into the mix. The big old pohutukawas on the reserve by our house are starting to hum with our bees. 

BCC7187D-929C-45BE-82CB-284A4511A1BF.jpeg

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@GoED that looks like a very nice place that  you live .

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Just now, kaihoka said:

@GoED that looks like a very nice place that  you live .

Yes @kaihoka the north end of Tauranga harbour is nice...it took a while to get here...in the end we returned to our childhood happy place after munting our health in many and various daft ways. We both grew up spending summers on Waihi Beach nearby. As is with many peoples mid-life stories we hit the proverbial wall at speed then made changes. It’s a good move to return to what brought you happiness as a child. If you can. We downsized, and the outside is full of flowers and bees.

Ate cockles and one very small mackerel for dinner last night. Still working out when the fish bite right here in the inner harbour. So far its mackerel but we’ll eventually get a mythical snapper. Our neighbours seem to have fancy fizz boats so we’re trying not to follow in their footsteps and have $3000/kg fish for dinner. It’s stand in the channel waist deep and cast instead. ?

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@GoED

I put a net out here .

On the bigger tides, esp on the new moon .

I am able to get , snapper ,/ brim , kawhai,   flounder, rig , trevally , estuary fish .

In the summer the lice can be bad and I will kayak out at midnight to get the fish live out of the net .

And hope there is not a large stingray in the net .

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I wish I had a chart to help me identify some of this stuff I harvested today 

ED0D7BD1-7DF3-481F-B8FD-E80E71AECB26.jpeg

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Those pollen colours are great @Jason K ...I’ll post the charts-in-progress when I get a few more colours in place. 

I’m planning to photograph the pollen colour charts when they are complete and share images freely here via the administrator -if they turn out ok. This first one is shaping up nicely but its about 1300 cells of cross referenced colour applied gouache and watercolour plus outlining and labelling.? ( Loving doing it. The bees have brought out a love of detail and complexity in me ) 

 

 I suspect there may have to be at least 3 versions over time. I’m still painting in Kirks (UK) pollen colours to the cells on the first version, I have about 120 cells for each flowering month and Kirk has about 280 plants listed some with 3 shades, so it’s looking like the first colour chart set might be mostly exotic pollens. Version 2- Our native plant pollen colours ( from Walsh and forum feedback) may have a chart of their own. Then Version 3- I try to create an overall set of charts but I suspect it might be massive.

 

It will certainly keep me out of trouble until the end of this season. At this rate I will be buying a 20m long roll of watercolour paper and going to a completely different level scale-wise. There sure won’t be room to hang the originals in this tiny cottage of ours. I’ll worry about that later, today I need to rake leaves and create some token garden ‘edges’ before the ‘tidy gardening’ family members arrive for Christmas. I’ll post some pictures of progress after the festive season.

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On 9/12/2018 at 8:00 PM, kaihoka said:

@GoED

I put a net out here .

On the bigger tides, esp on the new moon .

I am able to get , snapper ,/ brim , kawhai,   flounder, rig , trevally , estuary fish .

In the summer the lice can be bad and I will kayak out at midnight to get the fish live out of the net .

And hope there is not a large stingray in the net .

We’ll try that here!

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Mid March-update

I’m in my studio slowly finishing this first pollen colour chart, even though it’s full wall size,  it turns out the format I chose for the draft is still way too small to do justice to the exotic spring and summer pollens available. This last week has been dominated by slow cross referencing to ID the colours of winter pollen sources to complete that seasonal quarter. Later in the year i might follow up with another version in the form of month by month charts for exotic plants and native plants separately. I’m learning a fair amount about colour mixing and more about the botanical names of ornamental plants. On a positive note I’m pleased with the overall impression of this first attempt and it’s a good start as a draft. 

D624EFBE-A51E-4C32-A256-781DBCFDA512.jpeg

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14 minutes ago, GoED said:

Mid March-update

I’m in my studio slowly finishing this first pollen colour chart, even though it’s full wall size,  it turns out the format I chose for the draft is still way too small to do justice to the exotic spring and summer pollens available. This last week has been dominated by slow cross referencing to ID the colours of winter pollen sources to complete that seasonal quarter. Later in the year i might follow up with another version in the form of month by month charts for exotic plants and native plants separately. I’m learning a fair amount about colour mixing and more about the botanical names of ornamental plants. On a positive note I’m pleased with the overall impression of this first attempt and it’s a good start as a draft. 

D624EFBE-A51E-4C32-A256-781DBCFDA512.jpeg

Wow!!!

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1 minute ago, M4tt said:

Wow!!!

It’s given me a deeper appreciation of what the bees do and how long it takes them to bring in each load and fill every cell with food supplies for their colony. Their work is laborious and I admire them. I’d like to do a nectar source chart series later on too. This winter chart on the bottom left of the image highlighted a colony’s seasonal challenges to feed itself. Thank goodness we can lend them a hand, plant diverse flowering plants to fill the gaps, and provide supplements where needed. Honey is a precious thing. In fact, pollination is a precious thing.

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Looks stunning! Perhaps consider having groups for seasons, as months vary so much from place to place - even between city, coast, bush and rural in Auckland.

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Posted (edited)

That is beautiful, you’re very talented.

Edited by nikki watts
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25 minutes ago, nikki watts said:

That is beautiful, you’re very talented.

No talent required just a steady hand, good home made colour charts, good spectacles, patience and determination. I’m a little frustrated that this first try is not completely definitive and I have had to leave out a fair few of Kirks summer and spring tones and tints. Have only just started to add in Walsh’s NZ descriptions, those colours are described in words so hue accuracy will be up for interpretation. I think there’s room for about two years work ahead.

1 hour ago, Sailabee said:

Looks stunning! Perhaps consider having groups for seasons, as months vary so much from place to place - even between city, coast, bush and rural in Auckland.

Totally agree with you. The trick will be to get a 10m roll of Fabriano watercolour paper so Summer for example can be the size of a whole wall by itself.  Fun ahead this winter. ( I’ll take a break and do the Periodic Table next)

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1 hour ago, GoED said:

 

Totally agree with you. The trick will be to get a 10m roll of Fabriano watercolour paper so Summer for example can be the size of a whole wall by itself.  Fun ahead this winter. ( I’ll take a break and do the Periodic Table next)

Periodic Table will be a minor doddle even compared to what you have done already. I have 'pollen chart envy'.

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When its done if it turns out ok-ish Ill make images available to those of you on this topic line who would find it useful. The details on each cell are tiny but hey I think 2mb images of each seasonal quarter might be adequate if people zoomed in to view each cell. Better than nothing. Eventually I’d like to see a future version go in display somewhere where beeks can see it in a science library of some sort. It’s not perfect, this one’s a draft. In the meantime it will go up in our own library. There will inevitably be things that need amending and future versions. But we’ll get there. It’s essentially a gouache and watercolour illustration. It’s analog. It’s art before anything else. Best to get it finished. 

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It’s fabulous, a great resource & I thank you for your commitment, it’s plain awesome the amount of time must be immense 🐝

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Spanish Heath forage question-

I’m still dredging away on the winter pollens plants make available to bees for The Winter quadrant my pollen loads of bees chart started last November. 

 

Went for a walk up at the old Golden Cross mine today in the 11degree mist....amongst all the tussock, rocks and the Spanish heath, Erica lusitanica was in full bloom.

 

Spanish heath makes a nuisance of itself all over nz but it supplies bees with nectar, and that’s good. It flowers Mar-Dec (Walsh, pg 7) But I’m not sure if nectar is available all that time

 

My question is have you seen the bees retrieve any pollen from Spanish heath and at what time? 

 

Spanish Heath pollen might be a slight amount of plasticine like grey corbicula pollen, similar to Pink Heath Erica baccans, if has it at all. 

The chart on the table is the Winter quadrant ……… so you can see I’m having the same problem the bees do.

 

‘show us the pollen’

 

…any observations about key late Autumn and Winter Flowering plants would be appreciated .

Yep I know we don’t want them raising brood in the Winter but I’m shallow, not being a bee, and it would be great to have the Winter quadrant of the art work a bit more fleshed out to match the other three.

 

The absence of pollen tells its own story. But if people know what to plant for bee forage in times of dearth then they might do that. Plant for bees. 

 

The next series will be one chart for each month a series of 12 I’m picking, so I might overcome some of the limitations that affected this first iteration. I’m enjoying the background research so that’s good. 

 

I would like to attempt to do a nectar and honey chart too, somehow. 

B6EA081D-30E9-4124-B802-6D90E49A217C.jpeg

7A9AC9A1-79BA-4B20-B5FD-CE6FD71D0B06.jpeg

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1 hour ago, GoED said:

Spanish Heath forage question-

I’m still dredging away on the winter pollens plants make available to bees for The Winter quadrant my pollen loads of bees chart started last November. 

 

Went for a walk up at the old Golden Cross mine today in the 11degree mist....amongst all the tussock, rocks and the Spanish heath, Erica lusitanica was in full bloom.

 

Spanish heath makes a nuisance of itself all over nz but it supplies bees with nectar, and that’s good. It flowers Mar-Dec (Walsh, pg 7) But I’m not sure if nectar is available all that time

 

My question is have you seen the bees retrieve any pollen from Spanish heath and at what time? 

 

Spanish Heath pollen might be a slight amount of plasticine like grey corbicula pollen, similar to Pink Heath Erica baccans, if has it at all. 

The chart on the table is the Winter quadrant ……… so you can see I’m having the same problem the bees do.

 

‘show us the pollen’

 

…any observations about key late Autumn and Winter Flowering plants would be appreciated .

Yep I know we don’t want them raising brood in the Winter but I’m shallow, not being a bee, and it would be great to have the Winter quadrant of the art work a bit more fleshed out to match the other three.

 

The absence of pollen tells its own story. But if people know what to plant for bee forage in times of dearth then they might do that. Plant for bees. 

 

The next series will be one chart for each month a series of 12 I’m picking, so I might overcome some of the limitations that affected this first iteration. I’m enjoying the background research so that’s good. 

 

I would like to attempt to do a nectar and honey chart too, somehow. 

B6EA081D-30E9-4124-B802-6D90E49A217C.jpeg

7A9AC9A1-79BA-4B20-B5FD-CE6FD71D0B06.jpeg

You are correct on the colour. I notice bees collecting pollen from it more around late June and in to July over here in Putaruru. It is showing flower now but not producing as far as I can tell.

It can be a problem with days being changeable weather wise. Bees can leave the hive in a period of warm weather but chill when it clouds over then not making it home this can lead to brood that is being raised on the outer edges of the colony being chilled as the bees cluster during the still, cold nights.

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Posted (edited)

@GoED I could send you some hakea .

I shall see what I can find out about the pollen 

Also bees very busy in mahonia and loquat 

Edited by kaihoka
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Eucalyptus saligna, Sydney Blue Gum, white flowers any idea what colour the pollen is in the bees pollen baskets?

( the pollen on the anther in the flower is not the same hue as the load the forager carries).

Flowers well in BoP.

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