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JasonK

How to ripen honey boxes quicker

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Are there any things I can do to help the bees dehumidify the honey more quickly? I would like to extract a number of boxes before Christmas, but I’m waiting on much of it to be fully capped. Someone suggested propping each super up on matchsticks. 

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they will cap it when they cap it.. in the meantime you will have to be patient. 

You cant hurry the bees. 

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Wait, there's still a bit of time between now and xmas.

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59 minutes ago, john berry said:

Fresh nectar always has a high moisture content but stored honey is normally fine. Just because it's uncapped doesn't mean it has a high moisture content and for that matter just because it's  capped doesn't mean it's moisture content is low enough. Certain weather conditions lead to high moisture content honey and certain honeys are prone to being high moisture content such as tawari. Get yourself a hydrometer if you're worried. Generally speaking the dryer honey is the less runny it will be.

Yes Ive just spoken with a Taupo Beek who is pulling early Honey in order to catch an early Manuka Flow.
A lot of their bush wasnt capped but tested at 16%

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Is there any merit in the use of matchsticks to prop up boxes to create more ventilation? 

 

I doubt that any capped honey would be above the 20% mark, but it’d be interesting if that were the case. I’ve a refractometer on its way from China. 

 

If im to check uncapped frames then what if the parts I check are good but others not so good. It sounds like a gamble. 

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29 minutes ago, JasonK said:

If im to check uncapped frames then what if the parts I check are good but others not so good. It sounds like a gamble

A self - imposed impatient gamble !

Grab the frame turn it on it's side and shake like hell. If any nectar comes out it's too raw. If it doesn't then......

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Im not sure that the shake test is good enough to ensure the honey won’t ferment? But yeah I do that sometimes if I’m spinning out partially uncapped frames as a first check. 

 

Maybe dragging a teaspoon accross the frame in a few different areas and then checking in a refractometer might be a reasonable way of sussing out uncapped frames. 

 

Is it wrong to slow down on giving them more boxes until they show more progress on the capping? I’m running out of money at this stage! So many hives! ??

 

ideally I’d like to harvest the Rewa Rewa separately so it doesn’t mix with this summers kamahi. Kamahi is super prolific in Egmont national park. But the Rewa Rewa is special. Maybe I should just taste test with a spoon and mark each box accordingly, so as not to get them mixed. 

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2 hours ago, JasonK said:

Is it wrong to slow down on giving them more boxes until they show more progress on the capping?

 

I’d too would like to know if less boxes forces quicker capping. Same problem but with waaaay lower stakes. 

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15 minutes ago, cBank said:

 

 

I’d too would like to know if less boxes forces quicker capping. Same problem but with waaaay lower stakes. 

AAaaarrgggggghhhhh, I just can't take it any more !!!    "Less" refers to a singular object, "fewer" to a plural !!  Ie the correct statement here is "fewer boxes" as opposed to eg "less honey" 

Edited by yesbut
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@yesbut quite right. There are many erroneous usages of English throughout the world. So much so that they’re beginning to be accepted. Take kiwi people for example.. incorrectly using the past imperfect when speaking in the present tense – “did you want your receipt today?” 

 

yeah nah

 

 

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6 hours ago, JasonK said:

Is there any merit in the use of matchsticks to prop up boxes to create more ventilation? 

 

I doubt that any capped honey would be above the 20% mark, but it’d be interesting if that were the case. I’ve a refractometer on its way from China. 

 

If im to check uncapped frames then what if the parts I check are good but others not so good. It sounds like a gamble. 

Ive had manuka at 22% capped, you could see the bubbles under the capping, drums blew up within a few weeks after extracting..that year was a bad year for fermenting as others had same problem in the area

Edited by Dennis Crowley
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Manuka Mead is bound to be valuable.

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Sounds like capped honey is no longer a sure thing 

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On 27/11/2018 at 8:13 AM, john berry said:

Fresh nectar always has a high moisture content but stored honey is normally fine. Just because it's uncapped doesn't mean it has a high moisture content and for that matter just because it's  capped doesn't mean it's moisture content is low enough. Certain weather conditions lead to high moisture content honey and certain honeys are prone to being high moisture content such as tawari. Get yourself a hydrometer if you're worried. Generally speaking the dryer honey is the less runny it will be.

 

John Berry I'd like to know how you use a hydrometer to read moisture content; or do you mean a refractometer. I brew mead so use hydrometers all the time to measure specific gravity and hence alcohol levels. 

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On 27/11/2018 at 4:55 PM, JasonK said:

Im not sure that the shake test is good enough to ensure the honey won’t ferment? But yeah I do that sometimes if I’m spinning out partially uncapped frames as a first check. 

 

Maybe dragging a teaspoon accross the frame in a few different areas and then checking in a refractometer might be a reasonable way of sussing out uncapped frames. 

 

Is it wrong to slow down on giving them more boxes until they show more progress on the capping? I’m running out of money at this stage! So many hives! ??

 

ideally I’d like to harvest the Rewa Rewa separately so it doesn’t mix with this summers kamahi. Kamahi is super prolific in Egmont national park. But the Rewa Rewa is special. Maybe I should just taste test with a spoon and mark each box accordingly, so as not to get them mixed. 

 

our Kamahi and Rewarewa are in flower at the same time here in the Taupo area............I'm hoping more bees are heading to the Rewarewa but I will see when I start taking boxes off. The Kamahi is just now starting to turn brown. 

You've got a lot of time before Christmas, personally I put the next box on when I can see 2/3rds of the lower box is being capped. Is this wrong? 

 

 

Edited by Jay

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@Jay yeah kamahi flow has just really come on in the past week or so here but Rewa Rewa was prolific before that. Tastes like toffee 

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Yeah Jason we jar and sell our own product and Rewarewa is right up there with the favourite. This years flowering is off the chart - a one in 7 year event

 

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@Jay nice. I’d like to do the same, but I need to get my license sorted. Dunno where to start. Though I do have access to a licensed kitchen. 

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Start by doing a Food Safety Cert; that gets you certified to work in the food safe area. 

 

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@Jay ok, I’ll look at lining that up somewhere locally. Once I get that I just contact mpi or something to get the ball rolling?

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19 minutes ago, Jay said:

Yeah Jason we jar and sell our own product and Rewarewa is right up there with the favourite. This years flowering is off the chart - a one in 7 year event

 

I am not surprised it is a big flowering .

My macadamia had a big flowering too .

They are both the same family and probably need a hot late summer to ripen next seasons flowering wood .

I have never tried rewa rewa honey .

The shops down here do not seem to sell it .

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@Jay cool, I’ll give it a shot. How much should it cost for the certification 

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8 hours ago, kaihoka said:

I am not surprised it is a big flowering .

My macadamia had a big flowering too .

They are both the same family and probably need a hot late summer to ripen next seasons flowering wood .

I have never tried rewa rewa honey .

The shops down here do not seem to sell it .

Rewa honey is my favourite. When we get some I’ll send you a sample. 

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