Jump to content

November 2018 Apiary Diary


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 439
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Result of a thoroughbred queen for ya ☺️    

On your marks, get set.... Flow 

Is this a sign of the times? Most hives were dead long before the cows got to them.

Posted Images

11 hours ago, Beefriendly said:

Interesting day...

I have a hive that was supposed to go to a new beek tomorrow. The hive was checked on Tuesday 30/10, eggs, larvae, capped brood, stores, no AFB, Queen right. All looked good. 

 

So, being a nosey beek... thought I’d have a ‘quick peek’ in this avo

Off with the lid, lots of girls fanning, bums up in the air, ditzie, erratic behaviour. Hmm.Better check for her majesty. She’s a red dot, black girl, from Nov 2017 split, usually easily spotted.

On a thorough check through the frames, she wasn’t to be seen. No fresh eggs...On frame 7 there is a fine specimen of a hatched Queen cell. Obviously one I missed.  

I’m 99.9% certain , they’ve superseded her. 

Those bees, it would seem had different ideas.

They’ll stay put for now.

 

By contrast, the 2 hives I had set about to check, both queens seen.. One lovely queen, even displayed her egg laying skills. 

Sounds like they did you a favour. Nice new queen for the season. 

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, nikki watts said:

Sounds like they did you a favour. Nice new queen for the season. 

I’m glad it happened before they went to their new home....Quite funny in some ways..

We have had a lady house guest who “ talks” to animals, staying the last few days.

She’d noticed the hive and when I told her the plan for it, asked me, if had told them! ?Who knows what she said to them. ?

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I was all set to squash a slow, drone layer queen today and as prep I’d switched out a load of frames and put nice ones in a few days ago. The new queen wasn’t quite ready that day.

And now the ‘drone layer’ seems better behaved, lots of tidy laying (it’s eggs at this stage so it’s a bit early to be sure, but it looks a mile better than it was). Is this a thing? Big cells will always be drones and bad frames will never be repaired? There hadn’t been any attempts to replace her by the bees, which may have been a clue. They had a varroa problem in early spring which may or may not be relevant. The 6-7 frames I moved out were nearly entirely drones.

 

Semi related. It’s annoying working with lots of drones about. They are slow to get out the way, crawl up your arms a lot and buzz about even when walking. They also make way too much noise on a sunny day. The workers must be driven demented by them.

Edited by cBank
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, cBank said:

was all set to squash a slow, drone layer queen today and as prep I’d switched out a load of frames and put nice ones in a few days ago. The new queen wasn’t quite ready that day.

Why did you think she was a drone layer .

Once an unmated queen starts laying drones she can not start laying worker eggs .

I have a hive that has had no eggs for a month and will be requeened.

Just working out how to get the virgin out of the hive .

Edited by kaihoka
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Why did you think she was a drone layer .

Once an unmated queen starts laying drones she can not start laying worker eggs .

 

She was definately mated as I had workers over winter and have had some in early spring but with bad varroa.

I thought she was a drone layer because I had something like 6-7 frames of drone brood. However they were honey frames that the nuc cleaned out over winter, and they have big cells. The few nice frames they had were patchy as all hell due to varroa so I moved them up above the excluder to get them all hatched or cleaned before putting them back. Basically I think I gave her a ton of terrible frames and she repaid in kind.

Edited by cBank
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, cBank said:

 

She was definately mated as I had workers over winter and have had some in early spring but with bad varroa.

I thought she was a drone layer because I had something like 6-7 frames of drone brood. However they were honey frames that the nuc cleaned out over winter, and they have big cells. The few nice frames they had were patchy as all hell due to varroa so I moved them up above the excluder to get them all hatched or cleaned before putting them back. Basically I think I gave her a ton of terrible frames and she repaid in kind.

I have read that they will always put drones back in drone brood and you can only use those frames in honey supers .

Poorly mated queens can turn into drone layers when they run out of fertilised eggs.

I have had that happen .

  • Good Info 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, kaihoka said:

I have read that they will always put drones back in drone brood and you can only use those frames in honey supers .

 

This may be what has happened. Not sure how a poor worker would use all the space.

 

8 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Poorly mated queens can turn into drone layers when they run out of fertilised eggs.

I have had that happen .

 

Yes. This is what I thought had happened, I’ll give it a week or two and then recheck.

thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, cBank said:

The 6-7 frames I moved out were nearly entirely drones. 

If you are intending to put the frames in storage (and your frames don't have significant pollen, nectar or honey in them) you can decapitate all the capped drone brood with a breadknife (as if you were uncapping honey) and then with the garden hose with the nozzle set so the water 'fans' out rinse all the larvae out of the frame. Putting the frame with top bar downward and tapping it on something will dislodge the larvae and pupae remnants and water from the cells. You may have to repeat a few times, and it is messy, but you will end up with very clean frames you can leave in the breeze for a while to dry out.

Edited by Borage
typo
  • Like 1
  • Good Info 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Borage said:

If you are intending to put the frames in storage (and your frames don't have significant pollen, nectar or honey in them) you can decapitate all the capped drone brood with a breadknife (as if you were uncapping honey) and then with the garden hose with the nozzle set so the water 'fans' out rinse all the larvae out of the frame. Putting the frame with top bar downward and tapping it on something will dislodge the larvae and pupae remnants and water from the cells. You may have to repeat a few times, and it is messy, but you will end up with very clean frames you can leave in the breeze for a while to dry out.

If they have that much drone brood on them then I would strip the frames right back and rewire/foundation or if plastic waterblast and re wax.

Otherwise the queen will just refill with drone brood.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

If they have that much drone brood on them then I would strip the frames right back and rewire/foundation or if plastic waterblast and re wax.

Otherwise the queen will just refill with drone brood.

 

They make reasonable honey frames don’t they? Or is it unwise to use brood frames for honey? 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Yes. It is best to replace them. You don't really want brood frames in the honey boxes.

Remember that your varroa treatments have been on those frames

So that is issue , treatment residue in the wax .

If you pull brood frames up above the excluder for swarm control and other things you would have the same problem .

So best not to use synthetics and use @Philbee strips :14_relaxed:

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

We've been using MAQS and the OA staple idea is tempting too. We had several drone frames as a trial of drone culling for varroa. Half were drawn off a starter strip of wood on the top bar, and half were purchased drone comb. I think the purchased drone comb had too big cells and the bees made really wierd thick cell walls. I think culling the drones helped a little, but not worth the time it took and all the decapitations seemed wasteful of the hives' resources to raise that brood; and rather messy. As the bees seem happy enough building fewer drone cells along the periphery of the worker comb I'll melt down most of the stored drone comb this year. The drone combs that were still in the our hives late summer and autumn were moved to the edges of the brood boxes and the bees filled them with autumn honey stores, so @cBank could use them for that if they were not old comb.

Regarding the synthetic residue, how many treatments before that becomes an issue? Makes me wonder how many trendy wax lunch wraps have treatment residue.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

well FINALLY got into the hives this weekend. The strong winds made it hard to decide when I was going to get there so I put it off until sunday arvo when i just couldnt wait any more.

 Luckily the neighbour has a large 7 bay shed that shelters the hives a bit so the wind was less... but oddly enough the bees were busy and pretty much left me alone. which was good  cos my smoker would NOT STAY LIT until I was on the third hive, I must have lit it about 10 times.

In the end they got a puff at the entrance and that was it. Removed all treatment... next treatment time it will be OA strips going in, instead of synthetics, yay!

 

The swarm i chucked in the wee barely there hive is going great guns, lots of brood in both boxes now and filling every empty space with honey so they got a honey box (yay)... very happy with the decision to join them together... still couldnt find a queen but she (or they... lol wouldnt that be funny!) are there.

 

hive 2 had a lot of bees (3 boxes full) and a lot of honey, but hardly any brood, everything is being backfilled with honey so added another honey box... Im concerned there may be no queen cos of the lack of brood, but the bees werent bothering me at all so i couldnt say if they were queenless or have a virgin somewhere or the queen is off the lay, maybe honey bound?

 

Next hive had a REALLY good amount of solid brood in both boxes... also backfilling space with honey... and then wierdly on one frame on the second box was about 5 q cells right at the top, supercedure maybe, but only that one frame though, not one anywhere else.

So I made a call, killed the cells and stole a couple of frames of young eggs/brood, shook off the bees and chucked that in hive 2... they can either make a new queen if they want or it will just give them a wee boost of brood., and added some empty frames to hive three, as well as another honey box. Maybe they just need space for the queen... all the hives are just packing in honey everywhere.

 

Hive 4, busy and really full again, the empty honey box i put on a few weeks ago was full so I took most of it off... luckily this one I had already removed the strips from when i added the second box, so i just took out frames and replaced with empty ones, I need more boxes again... arrggghhhh!

 

Hive 5, going really well after the bee boost of a few weeks ago, added another honey box.

 

So need a couple more 3/4 boxes and a few spare frames. Also noticed the 2 plastic q excluders are warped, horrible things, I must replace the two i have with wooden or at least metal ones... mind you one of the wooden framed ones is also looking a bit damaged so i better get three new ones.

I'm slowly getting everything 3/4 so have about 4 full depth boxes just sitting in the shed... will have to get rid of them some time, seems such a waste especially of the nice drawn out frames, pity I cant really cut them down...guess they will make good fire starters. But just having 3/4 boxes is much easier for me... I can lift them so much easier and eventually I wont have keep cutting of comb of the 3/4s in the full depth boxes.

 

So all in all, going well... Ive never taken honey off in Nov before, seems far too early for down here, and last year I thought dec was early!

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Live and learn they say..

I was talking to a work colleague yesterday. I have some honey from Niue, she says. 

Hmm didn’t think you couldn’t bring honey into NZ.. She assured me it had been declared . 

Checked it out and there are a few places honey can be brought in from. 

B2B7DC83-D275-4600-BBA3-D8D930A75D93.thumb.png.ef78a4f4d9cf2d7579eda35c6a2d4f83.png

  • Good Info 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Rashika said:

so just looked at ecrotec website... at excluders... what is the difference between USA and Italian excluders, 

 

Italian excluders have flat horizontal wires which make them easy to clean the American ones are round and stick up which is harder to clean.

i took photos but can’t upload them. 

 

 

Edited by frazzledfozzle
  • Good Info 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

Italian excluders have flat horizontal wires which make them easy to clean the American ones are round and stick up which is harder to clean.

i took photos but can’t upload them. 

 

 

is it just a recent invention having the two types?

Cos I have 5 already, bought probably 5 years ago and i dont know what type they would be... they are hard to clean anyway!

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Rashika said:

. will have to get rid of them some time, seems such a waste especially of the nice drawn out frames, pity I cant really cut them down...guess they will make good fire starters.

You dont have to get rid of them @Rashika. A quick talking to with a table saw,( having carefully checked for the position of screws-) remove the bottom, not the top.

Frames downsize reasonably well too. We cut to finished required length, remove the lugs of the bottom bar and nail it inside the side bars. Frame resizing is only of value if you wish to retain drawn comb. Well worth the effort to rezize to 3/4

  • Good Info 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Rashika said:

is it just a recent invention having the two types?

Cos I have 5 already, bought probably 5 years ago and i dont know what type they would be... they are hard to clean anyway!

 

They have been around for quite a while.

the Italian ones were hard to find for quite a while and they were more expensive.

we prefer the Italian 

  • Good Info 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...