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Document Heads chewed off of Larvae

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We are getting a few larvae being dragged out of the hive that are very near ready to emerge as bees but are still white and missing their heads. Is this Varroa damage?

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Yes, or if the bees are starving they can start chewing down larvae.

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Hmmm that's what I thought.  No starvation going on plenty of tucker on board and coming in. Pulled the hive apart this afternoon to see what I could see.  Lots of capped brood and lots of new brood developing, queen is busy.  What was interesting was that there were about 6 or 7 brood cells all close together with the caps removed and nice white, nearly fully formed residents. No apparent damage to them though.

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2 hours ago, Beehaven said:

We are getting a few larvae being dragged out of the hive that are very near ready to emerge as bees but are still white and missing their heads. Is this Varroa damage?

 

It sounds like chalk brood to me . 

Google some images to compare with what you are seeing 

Edited by frazzledfozzle

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Another possibility is you brood has got cold due to frames being to far apart and died,now the bees are cleaning out there dead remains.

Are your frames hard up against each other?

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We got this hive as a nuc 2 weekends ago from a friend in a proper nuc box on the same day as it was split from the mother hive.  It spent a day in there before we transferred it (7 frames) to a 10 frame super. Nuc came with various stages of brood, queen and food. So it should not have gotten cold. Maybe these girls were already dead and they are just cleaning them out today. Will maintain a close watch to see what happens over the next few days. I wonder about cutting the remaining capless cells out and disposing of them.  It doesn't present as chalk brood exactly - the in situ larvae appear to be in perfect condition - just uncapped.

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10 minutes ago, Beehaven said:

We got this hive as a nuc 2 weekends ago from a friend in a proper nuc box on the same day as it was split from the mother hive.  It spent a day in there before we transferred it (7 frames) to a 10 frame super. Nuc came with various stages of brood, queen and food. So it should not have gotten cold. Maybe these girls were already dead and they are just cleaning them out today. Will maintain a close watch to see what happens over the next few days. I wonder about cutting the remaining capless cells out and disposing of them.  It doesn't present as chalk brood exactly - the in situ larvae appear to be in perfect condition - just uncapped.

Wax moth larvae damage ? Bees will uncap dead larvae that have been burrowed underneath by larvae although I’ve only ever seen the purple eyed larvae with their heads still on . They can present in a line 

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20 minutes ago, Beehaven said:

.  It doesn't present as chalk brood exactly - the in situ larvae appear to be in perfect condition - just uncapped.

 

I was meaning the white headless bees that were outside the hive might be chalkbrood.

the uncapped brood is common don’t worry about it and there’s no need to cut it out.

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The uncapped brood I am talking about are nearly fully formed bees - just white still.

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10 minutes ago, M4tt said:

Wax moth larvae damage ? Bees will uncap dead larvae that have been burrowed underneath by larvae although I’ve only ever seen the purple eyed larvae with their heads still on . They can present in a line 

 

After your second description would also go with wax moth.  The wax moth worm burrows its way under the brood and kills off the brood.  The damaged cells are often grouped together or in a line.  I usually cut at it with the hive tool and some times you can kill the worm.

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Thanks for all your help guys.  I will deal with it.

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4 hours ago, Beehaven said:

We are getting a few larvae being dragged out of the hive that are very near ready to emerge as bees but are still white and missing their heads. 

 

This is the comment I thought sounded like chalk brood 

 

http://beeaware.org.au/archive-pest/chalkbrood/#ad-image-0

 

1 hour ago, Beehaven said:

The uncapped brood I am talking about are nearly fully formed bees - just white still.

 

The uncapped brood is as others have said probably wax moth damage and nothing to worry about if it’s just a few here and there.

 

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Bald-brood-Wax-moth-larvae-tunnel-under-cell-cappings-causing-worker-bees-to-remove-the_fig6_272812280

Edited by frazzledfozzle
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or....the bees are trying to get rid of the varroa by eating down through the brood in order to get to the mites.

Now, where did I read that.

i think it might have been Randy Oliver or Tom Seeley

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