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Moving 30 double brood hives


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I like hives to have a minimum of three days to settle down after working before I shift them. A week is better. Try and pick a cold night and load the hives as soon as the bees stop flying in the eve

People who make sarcastic comments about Taupos weather are not likely to be invited to join @Philbee in his safe remote location when the end of the world comes . I have made it quite clear to m

That makes you semi commercial ??

4 hours ago, Frosty said:

Quick question. If the weather improves whist I'm traveling that's not an issue once I'm on the move right?

Might be an issue if you come across someone with a stop go sign. Especially for him/her

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People who make sarcastic comments about Taupos weather are not likely to be invited to join @Philbee in his safe remote location when the end of the world comes .

I have made it quite clear to my friends  to be nice about my weather . 

Since donald Trumps been elected they have become very polite .

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I would never shift during daylight at this time of year although I would start early on a cold night. Shifting in daylight during winter is fine on really cold day but you do have to be careful and can run into problems such as a double blow out and then the sun coming out. Fortunately I was at the end of nowhere but it was not one of my better days.

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Hi. The trip was a great success! I got the first lot loaded up with the help of my parents and my trolley. Then the second lot my mate helped me lift them on (way faster). Then I hit the road. I left some of them open and a couple closed (hive doctor bases). It didn’t seem like I lost many bees. As it was relatively cool and drizzling before I left, which kept most of them inside.

 

I didn’t stop until it got dark. My mate following me in the support vehicle only had half a dozen bees hit his windscreen. (We also had radio’s to communicate).

 

Once arriving at midnight we unloaded the first seven hives. But they started getting a bit upset. So after walking away for 45mins they all calmed down and went back inside their hives. Unloading them after we let them calm down was a whole lot easier. (Only ended up getting 3 stings each).

 

Cheers everyone for your advice.

 

I definitely think strapping each hive individually was a great idea. I only had one hive have its honey super move slightly. Before I unloaded it I smoked them back in the hive and it was all good.

 

And having someone follow you is key I think. I was able to drive at ease knowing my mate was watching the hives on the trailer.

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