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Top Bar Nuc’s

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Hi all, first post here from me and probably one of many. I am totally new to bee keeping with the exception of a very limited contact with bees at my old secondary school some 40 years ago. Ok, so a total newbie on the block. I have looked at hives and think the top bar is probably the best fit for me. First question and starter for ten, is there any reason why the walls of the hive are generally given as 1 inch thick? I have a lot of 12mm ply around which could easily be put to use. Second question, I note that Janet Luke has unfortunately had to give up and I was looking to source a nuc or two from her. Does anyone know where I can obtain nucs for TBH’s. do they need to be specifically for top bars orbs it possible,or even feasible to brush the bees from standard frame setups into the new hive with feed and expect them to get on with it?

 

looking forward to hearing from you.

 

cheers Eric

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1 hour ago, ETNZ said:

Hi all, first post here from me and probably one of many. I am totally new to bee keeping with the exception of a very limited contact with bees at my old secondary school some 40 years ago. Ok, so a total newbie on the block. I have looked at hives and think the top bar is probably the best fit for me. First question and starter for ten, is there any reason why the walls of the hive are generally given as 1 inch thick? I have a lot of 12mm ply around which could easily be put to use. Second question, I note that Janet Luke has unfortunately had to give up and I was looking to source a nuc or two from her. Does anyone know where I can obtain nucs for TBH’s. do they need to be specifically for top bars orbs it possible,or even feasible to brush the bees from standard frame setups into the new hive with feed and expect them to get on with it?

 

looking forward to hearing from you.

 

cheers Eric

The thinner ply will bow and bend under the weight of honey comb. I've recently reinforced mine which has 20mm thick walls. No such problems with the boxing timber we built the second one out of - go for the the sturdy stuff. 

As for the nuc, I got mine from janet but you can cut down lang frames to fit into a top bar, there are videos on YouTube. A swarm is ideal if you can get one. 

Your local beekeepers association is definitely worth getting in touch with. They may have members who can help you out. 

Otherwise I'm thinking of splitting a nuc off one of mine a bit later in spring, we're in the hawkes bay

Edited by Rhsgc
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Best bet is to get a swarm.  

Second option is to try and find another TBH beek with the same sized hive as you and get a starter nuc from them.

There is a reason why most beekeepers have Langstroth.  It is easier to get spare parts.

 

 

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Thanks Rhsgc and Trevor. I have feelers out for a swarm. Looks like i’ll Have to bolster or rebuild the hive then. 

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Welcome ETNZ to the forum!

 

We were new beeks, with the purchase of a Nuc (Nov 2015), after a previous 12 months of research....

This included reading and encouragement from our teacher daughter, 

joining the local Beekeeper club, and attending a night school course on bee keeping.

There is so much Bee speak to learn...let alone management, accountability and being a Registered Beek

 

Initally we thought we wanted a long hive....

As @Trevor Gillbanks has posted..there are reasons most goes with Langstroth

 

primarily the bees want to build vertically 

 

We then joined NZBees

gained a fantastic mentor through the forum and access to a wealth of resources.

 

It is worth the time to use the search tool...on the forum

research, research 

 

purchase a copy of Practical Beekeeping in NZ

find a mentor or Beek that is prepared to let you tag along and ask questions 

 

We are only the keepers.

Bees do what bees want to do

 

 

 

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Beefriendly said:

Bees do what bees want to do

Yes. but the art of hobby bee keeping is that you align what you want the bees to do with what the bees want to do ... and it's great when you can achieve this, but takes lots of experience and learning to solve the problems.  And just close the hive when there is no obvious answer, and go back when thought has taken place.

10 minutes ago, Beefriendly said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, tudor said:

Yes. but the art of hobby bee keeping is that you align what you want the bees to do with what the bees want to do ... and it's great when you can achieve this, but takes lots of experience and learning to solve the problems.  And just close the hive when there is no obvious answer, and go back when thought has taken place.

 

The experience just continues and there has had been lots of practical learning

For us it was better to conform to the Langstroth method

 

 

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