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tristan

tall hive pics

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39 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Are these the adolescent stags ?

Not sure Ive never seen them but I suspect not

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9 hours ago, Alastair said:

First job I had way back, the boss did not like to see hives going over 6 boxes although he was happy with 6. If a hive was 6 boxes (total), and needed another, he'd take a box or two off, bees and all, and put on a smaller hive.

this isn't really balancing, rather storing filled supers on other hives.

 

9 hours ago, Alastair said:

In Tristans pic we see the big hive, and a small one.

that small one is actually a nuc off an even stronger hive which i took a split off to stop it swarming.

but i think the queen failed.

however your quite right in that balancing a whole apiary is actually better.

but one catch is you have to watch is when you strengthen weak hives you don't ruin a strong hive in the process.

 

also taking honey off more often is a more productive way. the catch is having the time to do it and having extraction thats fast enough.

we generally do 3 harvest a year and many beeks think we are crazy for doing so many. a lot of places will only do one harvest a year.

i don't like not having excess boxes on during main flow. there is no guarantee your going to be able to get back to the hives quick enough. i've had it plenty of times where we have lost numerous boxes of honey due to not being able to get the boxes on quick enough.

the other factor to keep in mind is wax moth. last thing you want is boxes sitting in the shed during wax moth season.

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9 hours ago, Alastair said:

 

In Tristans pic we see the big hive, and a small one. My old boss would have considered that bad, wasteful beekeeping, he would have thought a better average crop between the two would have been achieved by balancing them both

Yup we the same, once they’ve been worked we will slam a box or two on a weaker corner, give the fresh boxes to the raging colony it just keeps things even. 

I call it “hiding the honey”  disease check, super up and hide honey . Too easy. 

Jeez I’m looking forward to our main crop up country.. nights under the stars.. veil less days , happy bees.., dream result. 

 

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53 minutes ago, Stoney said:

disease check, super up and hide honey . Too easy. 

easy? i don't think so.

you have to pull all the honey off, go through the brood then put the honey back on. thats tons of extra weight to be lifted. hows the back ??

i would be turning and burning, running back to base for the next load of boxes.

the only time i'm pulling boxes off, they are headed to extraction.

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11 minutes ago, tristan said:

easy? i don't think so.

you have to pull all the honey off, go through the brood then put the honey back on. thats tons of extra weight to be lifted. hows the back ??

i would be turning and burning, running back to base for the next load of boxes.

the only time i'm pulling boxes off, they are headed to extraction.

Base is 2hrs one way.. no way I’m running back to base, we run pallets with big single lids..  so it’s much better to hide a few boxes on slow corners meaning everything has even space. Also that means we aren’t having gear out above mats as spacers. 

Your system works for you that’s awesome.

We disease check every time we are in there not just at harvest, yes we lift full supers off to check brood. 

The main Manuka crop honey pull is like a well oiled machine.. disease hunters, blowers, runners and stackers..... easy..

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1 hour ago, Stoney said:

Base is 2hrs one way.. no way I’m running back to base, we run pallets with big single lids..  so it’s much better to hide a few boxes on slow corners meaning everything has even space. Also that means we aren’t having gear out above mats as spacers. 

Your system works for you that’s awesome.

We disease check every time we are in there not just at harvest, yes we lift full supers off to check brood. 

The main Manuka crop honey pull is like a well oiled machine.. disease hunters, blowers, runners and stackers..... easy..

single pallet lids. thats explains a bit.

the devil is in the detail ;)

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1 minute ago, tristan said:

single pallet lids. thats explains a bit.

the devil is in the detail ;)

Sure is.. more than one way to skin that cat. 

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On 18/09/2018 at 9:19 PM, tristan said:

pre harvast, full to the brim baby B|

I had very few doubts, done it before, but not seen it for a few years now though.

 

Ive seen whole areas that averaged over 100kg per hive

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2 hours ago, Charles said:

I had very few doubts, done it before, but not seen it for a few years now though.

 

Ive seen whole areas that averaged over 100kg per hive

Do you think that the reduction in honey quantity per hive is because there are more hives out there , or more because farming practices have changed and farmers are using urea more than clover.

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7 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Do you think that the reduction in honey quantity per hive is because there are more hives out there , or more because farming practices have changed and farmers are using urea more than clover.

 

Dont forget that even modern clover hybrids are a problem too. Some are not bee friendly

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Six boxes a hive ..... I need more boxes but I gotta build another shed to hide them , an all last years honey in ..... not to mention this years soon to be .....

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8 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Do you think that the reduction in honey quantity per hive is because there are more hives out there , or more because farming practices have changed and farmers are using urea more than clover.

This is one of the most important questions for researcher going forward.
There are many who will say its a no brainer and that it is obvious, however in the old days it was also obvious that if you stayed under water for 4 minutes you died, yet now days we can stay under water for hours, so what changed? not the water, not the person.

Technology changed and made the impossible possible.

 

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

Six boxes a hive ..... I need more boxes but I gotta build another shed to hide them , an all last years honey in ..... not to mention this years soon to be .....

No,think outside the square James you need a mobile extractor so you can use the same boxes on the same hives.

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19 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Do you think that the reduction in honey quantity per hive is because there are more hives out there , or more because farming practices have changed and farmers are using urea more than clover.

Nah that statement isn’t right . Farmers are using less urea than 5 or even 10 years ago , and that’s a very general statement . Obviously some will be using more , but on the whole , we farmers aren’t allowed to pour it on anymore .

Dairy companies keep nitrogen records now days from all farms ( in theory ). 

There are just more hives and the weather pays a major role 

Edited by M4tt
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11 minutes ago, M4tt said:

Dairy companies keep nitrogen records now days from all farms ( in theory ). 

Don't you have to keep a "Fertiliser Diary " ?

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17 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Don't you have to keep a "Fertiliser Diary " ?

Yes we do and that’s for all farms not just dairy . Not all regional councils have the same rules ( surprise surprise ) but here in the Waikato we are in the process of cleaning up the Waikato River over a 100 year timeframe , and that includes farm , industrial and  urban polluters . 

We have to account for the Fert used and it’s run through Overseer which gives a report of estimated nutrients lost off farm , through exporting product and leaching . 

And it’s user funded and expensive . It cost me $3500 to get my Nutrient Loss Report done for the 15/16 season done as the base year moving forward . It gets done annually , but it’s no where near the initial cost . 

But that’s only the start . Every land owner over 2 ha has to do it . 

And from there on we are going to have to pay , and get audited on farm annually, to have a Farm Environment Plan prepared which in essence proves what we are leaching and over the 100 year timeframe , improves and has less impact in the environment.

So in summary, the days af throwing urea on at unacceptably heavy rates are gone .

And yes , nitrates are also leached from plants like clover , gorse , broom , lupins. 

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13 hours ago, Josh said:

 

Dont forget that even modern clover hybrids are a problem too. Some are not bee friendly

Agree. some produce very little nectar, we had a Swiss type in the vine yard one year grew up to our knees flowers for miles, but no nectar, weather fine and sunny as well, 

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The tallest hive I've ever had the displeasure of harvesting exceptionally full boxes from, was when I worked for Keith Herron of Greenvale Apiaries back in the early 1980's. To remove the top four supers we used a step ladder that was on the deck of his big Ford truck. All his honey supers were full depth, and in that particular season the average weight was between 35 - 40 kgs.I remember the yard, in the Waikia Valley, a real sun trap. That season, I think it was either 1980 or 1981, he had the best honey crop of his life. From 1600 hives we pulled off slightly over 130 tons of bulk honey and he filled two refrigerated containers of cut-comb honey for export. It went to Saudi Arabia if I remember rightly, got some serious coin for that.

The hives were run at either two or three full depth brood nest, and every hive had a half depth on all year round, that was their winter feed box. I think the tallest hive had 12 or 14 supers above the 1/2 depth. It was Keith who insisted that these particular hives be supered excessively.

 

Can anyone beat that? Personally, I have never experienced a crop like that. 

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