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Trevor Gillbanks

New Zealand swarm dates for season 2018/19

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4th of January 2019. Another swarm today.  It makes you wonder what some beekeepers are doing with their hive.

This was a rather unusual swarm, in that it landed on the lawn.  Real simple job for the bee vac.  1.8 kg of bees.

Thanks @Paul Jenkin

 

 

 

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@Trevor Gillbanks that is strange bee behavoir to settle on the ground .

Was the queen damaged and couldnt fly and they were grouped around her .

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6 hours ago, kaihoka said:

@Trevor Gillbanks that is strange bee behavoir to settle on the ground .

Was the queen damaged and couldn't fly and they were grouped around her .

I presume the queen is fine.  The bees were very quiet.

I will check them in 3 or 4 days to see what is happening.

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I think they do that in windyness

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49 minutes ago, yesbut said:

I think do that in windyness 

Do bees swarm on windy days .

Now that i Think of it i Have only seen them swarm on calm days .

We missed our spring winds .

Having them now .

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1 hour ago, yesbut said:

I think they do that in windyness

There was no wind here yesterday.  Remember I live in Manawatu, not windy South Island or Turbulent Nelson.

 

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I caught two swarms early in spring right next to each other. One was hanging in a rose bush and the other was on the lawn about two meters away - it was really small but had a queen so I caged her up and boxed up both swarms. Left them there until dark. When I returned I had one empty box and one large swarm with the caged queen. 

 

Pretty sure the queen had simply crash landed on the grass and the bulk of the colony hadn’t quite realised by the time I got there. 

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Hi and Happy New Year  to forum members.

Am keen to collect any swarm that may occur here in Auckland.

Realize late in season but hopeful.

My hive has gone queenless and laying workers now. Lot of bees and keen to amalgamate.

Have emptied the hive of all bees, with hope that those laying workers don't make it back.

Am I doing the right thing please??

Thank you

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Swarm season is coming early this year I guess. That for I thought you need to see this one could,t stop to laugh.

 

 

 

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that was great for a laugh, mind you i have had the odd one that doesn't play by the rules

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I had this once, a swarm was in an Avocado orchard as I was shaking them I could see they had build comes on the tree??? They where not after a hollow tree or so and certainly they did not behave like a swarm. ouch

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14 hours ago, Manfred said:

I had this once, a swarm was in an Avocado orchard as I was shaking them I could see they had build comes on the tree??? They where not after a hollow tree or so and certainly they did not behave like a swarm. ouch

 

I’ve seen a couple that have build out in the open - I haven’t been beekeeping long so assumed that was relatively normal.  Is it not?

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No it's not. The bunch hanging in the open is usually transitory, (resting the Q, or waiting for scouts to report back ?)  My theory is if they don't move on and build

comb in the open they've got a dud lazy Q. And they get defensive as they're not in swarm mode anymore.

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yes, that's what they did.

 

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On 20/07/2019 at 12:23 PM, Manfred said:

Swarm season is coming early this year I guess. That for I thought you need to see this one could,t stop to laugh.

 

 

 

Get em girls, that's wha you get for being an amateur 

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Hi From the UK, The Swarm season finished and we are up to 47 colonies from 17. 

We are addicted amateurs and we got 1200lb of honey against 260lb last year, when neonics were still legal.  Only one major wipe out of bees due to pesticides at the beginning of the year. 

We have set up a group in S Oxfordshire using the Swarm coordinators app called Bee.Watch (www.bee.watch) where anyone can report a swarm without having to make phone calls.  There is an app and api to go on any web page for those that don’t have the app.  Collectors are notified in seconds and it sends a picture, gps and contact details.  Once one collector has adopted a swarm, others can’t.  Also bee keepers who use the app can register to receive a swarm.  You also end up with a map of where all the swarms have been for the season.

The whole secret is speed.  Get to the swarm BEFORE they go into buildings and become a pest ; so in our area, we have farmers, golf courses and pest control companies using the app.  One pest control company has delivered us 14 swarms this year as people also use it to report wasps so they are part of our local team and they deal with the wasps.

On the subject of wasps  a guy has developed a new entrance that stops wasps getting into your hives and helps significantly reduce robbing and other pests.  Its been entered in the “innovation” section of the National Honey Show (England) at the end of October, his name is Filipe Salbany and he has kept bees in N America, Africa, Portugal and now in the UK.  Apparently it is easy to fit and more importantly will be cheap!  

 

Check out the Pest controllers web site with the API installed. https://www.shire-pest-solutions.co.uk/bee-swarm-removal

 

On 1/08/2019 at 8:58 PM, Maru Hoani said:

Get em girls, that's wha you get for being an amateur 

On a serious note

1) He needs to read up on the "attack" pheromone and have smoke ready to mask it so he only gets stung once

2) That swarm probabaly weighed a kilo so dropping it from that height was not clever, raise the box up

3) Put the box under the swarm! clip the branch and lower it in

4) Put the frames in the box once they are in and

 

lastly dont wear blue or eat bananas

Edited by Norm
additional info
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Virgin queen hopping from tree to tree and no place to nest. Had been out for 5 days and finally settled on huge branch 3m high. Bees had stung beekeepers trying to bring swarm down and queen refused to settle, so had to use some tricks. Getting cold here in the UK, and rain does not help.

There are over 40 years of keeping bees here, so don't try this haphazardly. Queen is stunning.

 

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