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Apitraz


Cyathea
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1 hour ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

 

I was sent samples and I have put them into my hives.

 

 

 

Free samples Trevor?

 

we asked for a free sample pack but they said no we would have to pay.

After the tens of thousands of dollars we have spent with Ecrotek over the years they couldn’t even give us one packet free.

 

needlees to say  we will stick with Apivar. 

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5 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

Free samples Trevor?

 

we asked for a free sample pack but they said no we would have to pay.

After the tens of thousands of dollars we have spent with Ecrotek over the years they couldn’t even give us one packet free.

 

needlees to say  we will stick with Apivar. 

Yes. I was sent the samples so I can do the videos

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I will think if there is less amitraz in this product it should be cheaper. If it is not, then there is no reason for me to try it. I can understand if the lower dose of amitraz formula was designed to end up with less residue in the comb. wax, honey, however I will expect it to be cheaper than apivar. Meanwhile apivar works with no problems.

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Overseas has examples where varroa developed widespread resistance to amitraz within 3 years of widespread use, much faster then other synthetics, interesting that this variant only has half the Amitraz as Apivar, I suspect we are not far from seeing this

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I saw some of the new strips on Tuesday. I will probably change to them if for no other reason than they don't need ripping apart and are easier to hang between the frames. I now have moderate arthritis in my hands which doesn't normally worry me but after a day tearing strips in half they can get quite sore.

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5 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

I think the resistance was brought on by beekeepers cobbling together their own amitrax mix in various strengths and soaked in various types of material rather than a stable dose released in a regulated manner.

 

You are right. Home made concoctions in US ruined commercial based products which has lead to less commercial investment in varroa products.

 

What we do well in NZ is understand alternate treatment use. We have already doubled initial expectations on wide spread resistance to stage one treatments. Long may this cooperation continue.

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9 hours ago, Bushy said:

 

You are right. Home made concoctions in US ruined commercial based products which has lead to less commercial investment in varroa products.

 

What we do well in NZ is understand alternate treatment use. We have already doubled initial expectations on wide spread resistance to stage one treatments. Long may this cooperation continue.

Yes I agree Bushy, now if we could get the same time frame of treatment with everyone doing it we may be able to increase that a little longer perhaps.

They used to do it for hydatids and brucellosis, where they all treated in the same area around the same time.

We sort of do it here in the BOP as most beeks treat hives during KiwiPollination if only for keeping other beeks mites out, I cant be sure, and I could just be biased, but I hear of more varroa problems generally out side of the BOP than in. Would be good to do a bit of looking into it.

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12 hours ago, Bushy said:

Home made concoctions in US ruined commercial based products which has lead to less commercial investment in varroa products.

yes/no.

afaik apivar strips was used in the usa for tracheal mites (which doesn't work), the registration lapsed and then no one wanted to pay to big $$$ for re-register it.

apistan/bayvarol etc became resistant so they where left with home made Amitraz treatments.

its more of a case of commercial treatments either being resistant or not available meant home made versions had to be made.

there is commercial investment and a few other products have been released.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/09/2018 at 4:17 PM, Trevor Gillbanks said:

I don't know where you get this information.

I have both Apivar and Apitraz in my hot little hand

Both have exactly the same amount of ingredient

500mg Amitraz per strip which is 33g.kg of Amitraz.

 

from Randy Oliver

 

Development Of Resistance By Mites To Amitraz

A Red Flag?

The surprising thing to me, after watching the failures of fluvalinate and coumaphos as varroa quickly adapted to develop resistance to those chemicals, is how long amitraz has remained effective as a varroacide. When I checked to see how amitraz has fared in other countries, the results were mixed. I have no idea as to whether that is due to the different modes of application (more intense application will exert greater selective pressure on the mite), or whether it is due to the randomness of mutations for resistance.

In Argentina, where amitraz has also been extensively used against varroa, a recent study suggests that mites in some operations have become at least 35 times more resistant to the chemical [33]. Similar reports come from throughout the world (Italy, Portugal, Argentina, and France; reviewed by Pires [34]). Surprisingly, a friend in Chile tells me that amitraz failed to control mites there after only three seasons of use.

On the other hand, Semkiw [35], testing amitraz strips (similar to Apivar) in Poland, where the active ingredient has been used for 30 years, obtained up to 95% efficacy in eliminating varroa, with the majority of the mites dropping in the first three weeks, but full efficacy not obtained until 8 weeks.

Here in the States, Sammataro [36] found signs of varroa resistance to amitraz as early as 2003, wryly noting that “Surprisingly, mites also showed resistance to amitraz, which is not a registered acaricide.” And last year, Eischen [37] found resistant mites in some operations.

Practical application: the development of resistance to amitraz by varroa is a ticking time bomb for commercial operations that have become dependent upon this treatment (Fig. 4). It would be wise to become familiar with alternative methods of mite management. At the least, one should rotate amitraz with other treatments in order to help delay the inevitable development of amitraz-proof mites. And of course, use the more effective (and legal) strips.

Figure 4

Figure 4. Many commercial beekeepers monitor mite levels by applying a strong dose of amitraz to a hive, and then checking for the mite drop on a sticky board the next day. The problem with this assessment method is that if your mites start to develop resistance to the chemical, you could be blindsided by an undetected mite buildup.

Or a Red Herring?

For example, in France, where Apivar is authorized and used on a large scale since 1995, Veto-pharma takes part every year in an efficacy study.  The efficacy of Apivar remains very high despite a very intensive and repeated use for many years in a lot of countries worldwide [38].

Practical applications: Semkiw’s detailed study is worth reviewing. Note that the strips (2 per strong colony) were applied in the last weeks of August as the colonies began to curtail broodrearing and naturally reduce their populations. He found that the greatest control was obtained in those hives with less brood, and in the year when the temperature was warmer.

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29 minutes ago, Jason said:

from Randy Oliver

 

Development Of Resistance By Mites To Amitraz

A Red Flag?

The surprising thing to me, after watching the failures of fluvalinate and coumaphos as varroa quickly adapted to develop resistance to those chemicals, is how long amitraz has remained effective as a varroacide. When I checked to see how amitraz has fared in other countries, the results were mixed. I have no idea as to whether that is due to the different modes of application (more intense application will exert greater selective pressure on the mite), or whether it is due to the randomness of mutations for resistance.

In Argentina, where amitraz has also been extensively used against varroa, a recent study suggests that mites in some operations have become at least 35 times more resistant to the chemical [33]. Similar reports come from throughout the world (Italy, Portugal, Argentina, and France; reviewed by Pires [34]). Surprisingly, a friend in Chile tells me that amitraz failed to control mites there after only three seasons of use.

On the other hand, Semkiw [35], testing amitraz strips (similar to Apivar) in Poland, where the active ingredient has been used for 30 years, obtained up to 95% efficacy in eliminating varroa, with the majority of the mites dropping in the first three weeks, but full efficacy not obtained until 8 weeks.

Here in the States, Sammataro [36] found signs of varroa resistance to amitraz as early as 2003, wryly noting that “Surprisingly, mites also showed resistance to amitraz, which is not a registered acaricide.” And last year, Eischen [37] found resistant mites in some operations.

Practical application: the development of resistance to amitraz by varroa is a ticking time bomb for commercial operations that have become dependent upon this treatment (Fig. 4). It would be wise to become familiar with alternative methods of mite management. At the least, one should rotate amitraz with other treatments in order to help delay the inevitable development of amitraz-proof mites. And of course, use the more effective (and legal) strips.

Figure 4

Figure 4. Many commercial beekeepers monitor mite levels by applying a strong dose of amitraz to a hive, and then checking for the mite drop on a sticky board the next day. The problem with this assessment method is that if your mites start to develop resistance to the chemical, you could be blindsided by an undetected mite buildup.

Or a Red Herring?

For example, in France, where Apivar is authorized and used on a large scale since 1995, Veto-pharma takes part every year in an efficacy study.  The efficacy of Apivar remains very high despite a very intensive and repeated use for many years in a lot of countries worldwide [38].

Practical applications: Semkiw’s detailed study is worth reviewing. Note that the strips (2 per strong colony) were applied in the last weeks of August as the colonies began to curtail broodrearing and naturally reduce their populations. He found that the greatest control was obtained in those hives with less brood, and in the year when the temperature was warmer.

 

Just reading all of your quote. It does not mention Apitraz at all.  Several other brands are quoted but not this one.

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20 minutes ago, Chris Highman said:

As i read it they both have the same active ingredient Amitraz !!!!!!!!

Yep.  That's how I read it and posted about it a couple weeks ago.

 

On 12/09/2018 at 4:17 PM, Trevor Gillbanks said:

I don't know where you get this information.

I have both Apivar and Apitraz in my hot little hand

Both have exactly the same amount of ingredient

500mg Amitraz per strip which is 33g.kg of Amitraz.

 

 

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