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Trevor Gillbanks

September 2018 Apiary Diary

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@Philbeewill you make queens out of that "big" hive? It has a beautiful brood pattern and if you say that there are a lot of eggs it means the queen is not a lazy type, while the bees are good foragers too.

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4 hours ago, Kiwi Bee said:

@Philbeewill you make queens out of that "big" hive? It has a beautiful brood pattern and if you say that there are a lot of eggs it means the queen is not a lazy type, while the bees are good foragers too.

 

Is laying all winter a good thing or a bad thing? Brood breaks are good for varroa but that seems to have been staples down nicely. They must eat a fair bit too.

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1 hour ago, cBank said:

 

Is laying all winter a good thing or a bad thing? Brood breaks are good for varroa but that seems to have been staples down nicely. They must eat a fair bit too.

I had three hives which had brood breaks .

The hive that didn't had a huge varroa drop compared to the others after I put the strips in.

This is still a strong hive and does not seem crippled by all the varroa.

My weakest hives are ones who had brood breaks .

But my  currently strongest hive  did too. It's brood break was caused by a late mated supersede queen who waited 6 weeks to lay.

I think that's pretty ideal.

 

 

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I would think long and hard before breeding from a hive that strong. A lot of my hives come through winter with less than half a box of bees but they will be ready for the honey crop and in the meantime they have not consumed much stores. I have seen Italians that would breed until they starved and those strains are one of the reasons Italians have a bad name. If my hives can't survive the winter on six frames of honey (most do it on three) then they don't survive. Hives lost to starvation last winter, three, but they had obviously been robbed out in the autumn.

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40 minutes ago, john berry said:

I would think long and hard before breeding from a hive that strong. A lot of my hives come through winter with less than half a box of bees but they will be ready for the honey crop and in the meantime they have not consumed much stores. I have seen Italians that would breed until they starved and those strains are one of the reasons Italians have a bad name. If my hives can't survive the winter on six frames of honey (most do it on three) then they don't survive. Hives lost to starvation last winter, three, but they had obviously been robbed out in the autumn.

My hives have all got surplus honey stored and there is new nectar coming in.

What happens to the capped honey left on.

Do they eventually use it .

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7 hours ago, Kiwi Bee said:

@Philbeewill you make queens out of that "big" hive? It has a beautiful brood pattern and if you say that there are a lot of eggs it means the queen is not a lazy type, while the bees are good foragers too.

Normally I would run a mile from a Hive like this.
I dont believe it is good management to Breed from extremes as you can get extremes in return which might be "Extremely Poor"

Or extremely all sorts of things.

However this Hive does have an air of "consistently good" about it so I may give her a go.
It is likely however that she wont breed true.

The Brood photo is from another very average hive at the site.
The big Hive had slab upon slab of Brood.

That Brood photo is typical of my Hives this Spring and in General the Brood for most hives is better than one would expect for the hive at face value

Edited by Philbee
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36 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Normally I would run a mile from a Hive like this.
I dont believe it is good management to Breed from extremes as you can get extremes in return which might be "Extremely Poor"

Or extremely all sorts of things.

However this Hive does have an air of "consistently good" about it so I may give her a go.
It is likely however that she wont breed true.

The Brood photo is from another very average hive at the site.
The big Hive had slab upon slab of Brood.

That Brood photo is typical of my Hives this Spring and in General the Brood for most hives is better than one would expect for the hive at face value

Here is another typical Spring Frame from yesterday

 

spring brood.jpg

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Spring treatments out today. 3 of the 4 home hives needed supering. Kowhai and clematis flowering and Rewa Rewa budding up unlike last year.

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8 hours ago, Philbee said:

Here is another typical Spring Frame from yesterday

 

spring brood.jpg

Looks like a couple  of mites on those bees.  Bottom rite corner. You sure those those staples are doing the job?

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A catch up afternoon of putting Apivar in the last 20 hives and swapping some nucs over to 10 frame boxes. Finally cycled out the last 3/4 depth box in the system from my hobby days. Bees are looking really healthy but chomping through the feed quickly. Using nectar up as fast as it is coming in. Some hives up to 8 frames of brood now which is about 4 weeks earlier than last year. The big brood hives are triple box hives that overwintered very strong. Beaut day here about 18, 19 degrees.

E8CF33B2-F89C-4868-80D8-C3444E6F4447.thumb.jpeg.b2613013bfb6f76b06c4cb39062f2abb.jpeg

F6C5779E-3530-42AD-B5A7-D3189276EB20.thumb.jpeg.9dd5a2eebeabd11b26bd12942e4cbd46.jpeg

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22 hours ago, Philbee said:

Here are some pics of todays rounds

One big hive (5 boxes)  20 staple in Autumn and 20 staples in today 
Its a one in 1000 hive this one,

Was so strong in Autumn that it couldn't be wintered down normally.

3  .5 boxes full of bees

 The dismantled hive is the big one in bits.

The Brood is another one from the same site, typical of my hives this season, 
The center is full of eggs

OA Bigh hive 20 staples.jpg

Oa hive 1.jpg

Oa Hive.jpg

Holy heck ..... I'm moving up to Taupo !

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2 hours ago, jamesc said:

Holy heck ..... I'm moving up to Taupo !

Na Mate, these are all photoshoped

While we are here, look at that clear liquid running down the side of each box.
Thats the excess solution scraped out of each Staple when it is dragged firmly across the edge of the boxes 

Scraped dry this hive wont even blink at the 20 Staples I put in it

Edited by Philbee
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11 hours ago, Philbee said:

Na Mate, these are all photoshoped

While we are here, look at that clear liquid running down the side of each box.
Thats the excess solution scraped out of each Staple when it is dragged firmly across the edge of the boxes 

Scraped dry this hive wont even blink at the 20 Staples I put in it

 

How about a solution like this? https://bigsqueeze.com/products/big-squeeze-tube-squeezer-blue

 

and there are more traditional clothes wringers available too. 

 

You could soak, wring and fold at home. Then take’m boxed out to field. 

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44 minutes ago, Josh said:

 

How about a solution like this? https://bigsqueeze.com/products/big-squeeze-tube-squeezer-blue

 

and there are more traditional clothes wringers available too. 

 

You could soak, wring and fold at home. Then take’m boxed out to field. 

I would like to see what your wrists are like after doing a few hundred staples in 1 go.  RSI

 

The idea looks good.

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45 minutes ago, Josh said:

 

How about a solution like this? https://bigsqueeze.com/products/big-squeeze-tube-squeezer-blue

 

and there are more traditional clothes wringers available too. 

 

You could soak, wring and fold at home. Then take’m boxed out to field. 

For the hobbyist fine
The commercial is best to just use a handy sharp edge like the Pail lip or box edge.
It takes about 15 seconds or less to do each 

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Apivar is in the hive so I’ve had to cool my heels whilst itching to try staples. 

So today I tried a 10% Oa mix today, and I like it.

 

91E66C18-CFD8-44B9-A014-DA20B60AFE99.jpeg

102F1DDA-343E-4FA0-B824-12C221743A59.jpeg

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44 minutes ago, cBank said:

Apivar is in the hive so I’ve had to cool my heels whilst itching to try staples. 

So today I tried a 10% Oa mix today, and I like it.

 

91E66C18-CFD8-44B9-A014-DA20B60AFE99.jpeg

102F1DDA-343E-4FA0-B824-12C221743A59.jpeg

100 +1 things to do with OA ?

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30 minutes ago, Beefriendly said:

100 +1 things to do with OA ?

Made the dog transparent too?

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On 15/09/2018 at 1:10 AM, Kiwi Bee said:

 

@Rashikayou may want to consider to swap places of the strongest hive and hive 5.

Maybe it is worth to look into swapping another strong hive with hive 1. 

But first open the hives to have a clear picture of what is worth to do.

When I have such a big differences between hives I prefer to boost the weaker hive with the above mentioned method.

Could possibly swap hives, but I think adding a frame of brood and bees from the large ones to the smaller ones will be quicker. (the larger hives are three boxes high already)

When i get back to them, Didnt happen this weekend, too many visitors and not enough time. next weekend... and when i have time to check them again to make sure treatment is helping.

 

I really want to try the OA strips during summer but still have to get the sewing machine out to get them made... on my to do list!

 

Edited by Rashika
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32 minutes ago, Rashika said:

 

I really want to try the OA strips during summer but still have to get the sewing machine out to get them made... on my to do list!

 

 

It takes takes longer to get the machine out.... than to do for a hobbyist ?

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On 13/09/2018 at 10:56 AM, dansar said:

A Variety called Hawera is self fertile. I have it at home. Big red fleshed fruit similar to Dorris variety. Yummy ? 

Got one too. Cops reckon next time it gets stripped of fruit I can call them. Cool eh. Trouble is it can be seen from the street and difficult to fingerprint branches so we are considering our options ??

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Woke up this morning with the worst frozen neck I have ever had. Muscles on my left shoulder had spasm so tight I couldnt turn my head left or right or even lean forwards.

A morning trip to Rotorua to my wife’s chiropractior who managed to get the muscles loosened up and half as painful as it was. Then back to Beekeeping duties out feeding nucleus colonies. Moving and stretching definitely helped but now that I am home a sitting down I can feel it all cramping up again ?

D5E9F4DE-CCE7-43E2-8A4B-CD493C46AA46.thumb.jpeg.a5e994e10d1f35195e95579f68bf553e.jpeg

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22 minutes ago, dansar said:

Woke up this morning with the worst frozen neck I have ever had. Muscles on my left shoulder had spasm so tight I couldnt turn my head left or right or even lean forwards.

A morning trip to Rotorua to my wife’s chiropractior who managed to get the muscles loosened up and half as painful as it was. Then back to Beekeeping duties out feeding nucleus colonies. Moving and stretching definitely helped but now that I am home a sitting down I can feel it all cramping up again ?

D5E9F4DE-CCE7-43E2-8A4B-CD493C46AA46.thumb.jpeg.a5e994e10d1f35195e95579f68bf553e.jpeg

Yeah .... I had that once. I had to lie on the floor for two days before I could think of moving. I had a bad back from day one of bee keeping and went to all sorts of Chiropractors who said I should probably think of a career change. When I met my  wife to be her sister was a massage therapist and after six months of regular weekly massage the back is  now as good as gold..... mostly. I think the secret is to keep the muscles and ligaments supple ..... yoga.... swimming..... cycling ........ lifting Bee boxes !

 

 

good as gold . 

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1 hour ago, Jean MacDonald said:

Trouble is it can be seen from the street and difficult to fingerprint branches so we are considering our options ??

 

If it’s fenced and has a gate, lock the gate and put creosote on the top rail. Sorted my problem and the woman still gives me filthy looks 5 years later!

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6 minutes ago, cBank said:

 

If it’s fenced and has a gate, lock the gate and put creosote on the top rail. Sorted my problem and the woman still gives me filthy looks 5 years later!

Was thinking of getting a chihuahua 

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