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August 2018 Apiary Diary

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Just now, kaihoka said:

If the varroa eventually develops full blown resistance to the currently used synthetics labour costs in using something that actually works will be irrelevant if one wants to continue bee keeping .

Exactly 

At the time when I actually read the article I thought that these guys were thinking very inwardly in that regard.
Cost is totally relative.

Thats when Pams Cloths came into being

I figured that if they actually worked then the time taken to place the wriggly little sods would be worth it.

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Soooo... I went beekeeping today, novel, I know!

 

Checked out two of @Daleys yards up a clay track. Last visited in early April. It's always a relief to see that your planning has paid off and the girls just got on with the job. Honey left on, hives pretty damn fine looking. Stoked as. The willows are greening up and will be doing their thing soon. 

 

Strips in, bye, bye girls see you in a wee while.

 

Hope the rest of them have faired as well. As Forest Gump said, "Lifes like a box of chocolates..."

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3 hours ago, Philbee said:

Patents started a while back and continue but if someone was to just use a single sheet of gib tape it wouldn't work very well.
Even if the patents are successful I dont intend on trying to stop people from making them, even commertials.
I have other plans for the Patents that will serve the industry well.

Nothing ventured nothing gained, I watched an interesting Ted Talk once about how to dry your hands with paper towels and save the amount you use, one way was using lots of them, the other way was using less, the difference between the two was not a lot but the way you used them made all the difference, all about the way moisture and paper work together.

His next talk was about how to save on toilet paper but I gave that one a miss.

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3 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

Nothing ventured nothing gained, I watched an interesting Ted Talk once about how to dry your hands with paper towels and save the amount you use, one way was using lots of them, the other way was using less, the difference between the two was not a lot but the way you used them made all the difference, all about the way moisture and paper work together.

His next talk was about how to save on toilet paper but I gave that one a miss.

 

A Gib tape staple is actually a remarkably complex piece of kit that has the Devil in the detail.
The next one is as apparently simple but will last at least 2 months in the epi center of the Brood nest

It is designed to allow for future application options and will cost about 3 cents more each  than the current ones
 Its likely that these things will be used in their tens of millions each year around the world within 10 years.

Modesty aside, its likely these humble pieces of paper are the most significant agricultural discovery of recent history

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7 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

How is the oxalic released from the leaf and how are mites affected by it?

By mastication.......?

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Just now, dansar said:

By mastication.......?

No not mastication at all,
Im not sure that Mastication is even an appropriated Bee word.
The Staple like all Strips is a contact device.

The Bees do remove it but whether they Masticate is a matter of interpretation 

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8 hours ago, Philbee said:

Modesty aside, its likely these humble pieces of paper are the most significant agricultural discovery of recent history

heard of crispr?

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1 hour ago, tommy dave said:

heard of crispr?

no, do tell

 

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5 minutes ago, Philbee said:

no, do tell

 

Google describes crispr but where is it right now?

Will it save the Beeks Bees in towns across NZ this season or next or the next?
The life raft that is 1 stroke beyond your exhaustion point isnt a life raft

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48 minutes ago, Philbee said:

The life raft that is 1 stroke beyond your exhaustion point isnt a life raft

 

Yes it is. It just won't save you.

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On 19/08/2018 at 10:10 PM, Dennis Crowley said:

i was speaking at a hobbyist group today, a young fellow came up an says he has been placing rhubarb leaves across the tops of his frames, the bees chew it to remove it and so far he has low levels of varroa.  I told him to keep monitoring and keep a diary and keep an eye on the health of his hives. But I thought what a out of the box thinking from the lad.

Now for you scientific minded, I want to encourage this young fellow, so how can he set up a small experiment to test his rhubarb system. I hate rhubarb but this might change my mind.

 

I was at the meeting too. Thank you for your great talk.

 

As for setting up an experiment, I think it would necessarily place bees at risk of mite overload.

 

You'd want at least 4 hives in a similar area with the same starting mite load (preferably low). You'd want preferably same queen stock.

Count mites.

One hive you give a standard treatment

One hive you give what you reckon to be the average dose of rhubarb

One hive you give a high dose of rhubarb

One hive you do nothing (control)

 

Do mite counts at standard intervals through the treatment, and plot the results on a graph.
Record other indicators of hive health

Win 1st prize at the national school science fair.

If during the mite counts, you became seriously alarmed by hive condition, you could always abandon the experiment and go to standard treatments.  Write that up and it's still good science.

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8 minutes ago, Smifff said:

 

I was at the meeting too. Thank you for your great talk.

 

As for setting up an experiment, I think it would necessarily place bees at risk of mite overload.

 

You'd want at least 4 hives in a similar area with the same starting mite load (preferably low). You'd want preferably same queen stock.

Count mites.

One hive you give a standard treatment

One hive you give what you reckon to be the average dose of rhubarb

One hive you give a high dose of rhubarb

One hive you do nothing (control)

 

Do mite counts at standard intervals through the treatment, and plot the results on a graph.
Record other indicators of hive health

Win 1st prize at the national school science fair.

If during the mite counts, you became seriously alarmed by hive condition, you could always abandon the experiment and go to standard treatments.  Write that up and it's still good science.

you have successfully recreated a shop towell but without the GL

Edited by Philbee
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On 19/08/2018 at 10:10 PM, Dennis Crowley said:

i was speaking at a hobbyist group today, a young fellow came up an says he has been placing rhubarb leaves across the tops of his frames, the bees chew it to remove it and so far he has low levels of varroa.  I told him to keep monitoring and keep a diary and keep an eye on the health of his hives. But I thought what a out of the box thinking from the lad.

Now for you scientific minded, I want to encourage this young fellow, so how can he set up a small experiment to test his rhubarb system. I hate rhubarb but this might change my mind.

 

Getting the jump on this new method.  Superior large leaved plants.  Leaves guaranteed to grow at least 600 - 800 mm accross

ED6BEB25-149C-4C7C-B03A-81D0D68C68FB.jpeg

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21 minutes ago, Philbee said:

you have successfully recreated a shop towell but without the GL


Yep, the scientific method is fairly well established, regardless of what you want to test.

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Parsley has twice as much acid as rhubarb.

I could try spreading around in the hive .

Bees like the pollen . I wonder if that has any affect 

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Just so you know, the amount of oxalic, in anything's leaves, varies with season, variety, and geography. You might have to give them all the same leaf.  :)

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Something else you guys should know
The acid in these plants is locked inside and isnt on the surface.

Staples , towels and strips are contact mechanisms.

If you choose to pursue this type of treatment it probably should be as a trial that looks at the efficacy of a non contact treatment 

Or you could look at just how much if any Acid is available at the surface and then appraise this versus efficacy etc

 

Edited by Philbee
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18 hours ago, Philbee said:

 

A Gib tape staple is actually a remarkably complex piece of kit that has the Devil in the detail.
The next one is as apparently simple but will last at least 2 months in the epi center of the Brood nest

It is designed to allow for future application options and will cost about 3 cents more each  than the current ones
 Its likely that these things will be used in their tens of millions each year around the world within 10 years.

Modesty aside, its likely these humble pieces of paper are the most significant agricultural discovery of recent history

 

Having considered the options for a levy on honey I now reject it.  I think an industry levy on gib tape would be more effective.?

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3 hours ago, Philbee said:

you have successfully recreated a shop towell but without the GL

 

With one big upside. The leaf stems can go into a crumble.

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So .... hows the nuc market looking ?  Sods law being what it is, today we were going through bees replacing the o/a cloths, admiring  the fact that as we split the two brood boxes the drone brood in the bee space contained no mites and the bees were humming. I commented to main man that out of one yard we could probably pull 250 nucs, knock the hives all down to two frames of brood and bees and still get a honey crop. So ..... whose buying nucs these days  or we are going to end up doubling our numbers this year , as the way they are going they will be hanging in the pine trees in another month.

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2 hours ago, CraBee said:

 

Having considered the options for a levy on honey I now reject it.  I think an industry levy on gib tape would be more effective.?

Talk to Winston Wall Boards. (Joke)

But seriously they are in the thick of this.

Its their Trade mark that has found itself on the Knife edge with regard the future of this product.
Its a place they didn't plan to be and I imagine they are more than a little nervous.

Lucky they've got some good people working for them.
As Time goes by they may strengthen their relationship with the industry and that brings us to a point.

Where do we spend industry funds for best effect?
What is the ideal role of an industry Body?

What features are exclusive to the Apiculture industry that can be leveraged outside of this industry for our benefit? 

What do we need to do to make more money?

Who needs to do this?

Who pays and how much?

 


 

 

 

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1 hour ago, cBank said:

crumble.

Like an apple crumble?

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

So .... hows the nuc market looking ?  Sods law being what it is, today we were going through bees replacing the o/a cloths, admiring  the fact that as we split the two brood boxes the drone brood in the bee space contained no mites and the bees were humming. I commented to main man that out of one yard we could probably pull 250 nucs, knock the hives all down to two frames of brood and bees and still get a honey crop. So ..... whose buying nucs these days  or we are going to end up doubling our numbers this year , as the way they are going they will be hanging in the pine trees in another month.

Heard today that there are Nucs moving, 400 of them was the number

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1 minute ago, Philbee said:

Heard today that there are Nucs moving, 400 of them was the number

NIce. That denotes confidence. As an industry, that is what we need at this time of year.

Edited by jamesc

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