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August 2018 Apiary Diary

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4 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Been packing honey today for the container shop that is due to be up and running shortly .....It's interesting how enthused one gets when you see the packed honey and equate it to a few dollars in the back pocket rather than just looking at stacked up in a drum in the shed wasting space.

Moved bees last night out of the Dew but gave up when it started snowing .... citing health and safety issues when questioned by the Boss as why I was home before the sun got up.

Pop up shop?

Great idea and possibly a common sight in the future.
Mum Knows that every second Thursday she can buy good Honey for olden day prices at the "Pop Up" shop.

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2 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Pop up shop?

Great idea and possibly a common sight in the future.
Mum Knows that every second Thursday she can buy good Honey for olden day prices at the "Pop Up" shop.

Your onto it ..... quality honey at backyard prices.  

The interesting thing about the night was the amount of fallow deer out and about. Pity about the company policy of no guns in trucks.

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Question Mr PhilBee .... Oxcalic ..... you chastised me nicely for using shop cloths ..... BUT ..... the bees access the O/A whether it be by Gib or cloth and move it around the hive, right?  SO at this time of year when the bees have come out of there cluster and are buzzing around the boxes they are translocating the acid, whether it be from cloth or gib and killing the the little critter mites .... maybe I'm missing something ?

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1 hour ago, Philbee said:

I might get some tax deductible travel out of it if I can overcome my fear of terrorists on planes

 

The guys checking for terrorists are far more of a threat, time sink and general hassle. 

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4 minutes ago, cBank said:

 

The guys checking for terrorists are far more of a threat, time sink and general hassle. 

Na Mate, its a long way to the ground.

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3 minutes ago, cBank said:

 

The guys checking for terrorists are far more of a threat, time sink and general hassle. 

Air travel is the safest way to move .... all you gotta do is stop watching Air Crash Investigations ..... 

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Air travel ..... I flew out of Islamabad a few winters ago with PIA ..... Prayers In  Air. Not long into the journey the 7?7 came to a grinding halt mid air.  The back end was empty except me and two stewards standing braced at the emergency exits. They both froze as the aircraft started to shudder and shake. Not long after the Capitain informs us that there has been a slight issue with the undercarriage.   He had had to lower it to extinguish the fire because it had been so hot in  Islamabad. 

We made Hong Kong quite a few hours later and transferred to Air New Zealand. I said a small prayer at Auckland when  immigration swiped me through with a chuckling  'Welcome Home".

Sometimes they are so nice . 

I still pray a lot when I fly , being closer to God an all that.

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51 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Question Mr PhilBee .... Oxcalic ..... you chastised me nicely for using shop cloths ..... BUT ..... the bees access the O/A whether it be by Gib or cloth and move it around the hive, right?  SO at this time of year when the bees have come out of there cluster and are buzzing around the boxes they are translocating the acid, whether it be from cloth or gib and killing the the little critter mites .... maybe I'm missing something ?

The bees do spread it around but if the OA is right there in the brood there is going to be more where it is needed most
and less where is is needed least.
Also its probably a matter of what Bees are doing what jobs in various locations within the hives
How much time will the young nurse Bees spend walking about outside the Brood Nest on top of a towel, especially in but not limited to a single

Its also a matter of experience, 
Staples in the Brood Nest  as a sole treatment work much better than towels on the Top Bars.
From the very beginning, when I read for the first time about Randy Oliver's Shop Towel system, one sentence has stuck with me.
It was Randy quoting his son who said that there was too much labor involved and Shop Towels would never fly.

This indicated to me that The Oliver operation was strongly focused on labor costs and that the shop towel in its current form was a barely acceptable compromise which subsequently failed because they weren't prepared to take it to the next step which was putting the  OA between the frames.


 

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I’ve used: vapourising for a season, never got on top of the pms,  then towels for part of a season this gave very variable results some hives better than others, but always mites on the sticky boards.  Now gib tape Oa/GL staples.  The results with staples wins hands down, many hives with no mites on the boards at all. 

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23 minutes ago, Philbee said:

The bees do spread it around but if the OA is right there in the brood there is going to be more where it is needed most
and less where is is needed least.
Also its probably a matter of what Bees are doing what jobs in various locations within the hives
How much time will the young nurse Bees spend walking about outside the Brood Nest on top of a towel, especially in but not limited to a single

Its also a matter of experience, 
Staples in the Brood Nest  as a sole treatment work much better than towels on the Top Bars.
From the very beginning, when I read for the first time about Randy Oliver's Shop Towel system, one sentence has stuck with me.
It was Randy quoting his son who said that there was too much labor involved and Shop Towels would never fly.

This indicated to me that The Oliver operation was strongly focused on labor costs and that the shop towel in its current form was a barely acceptable compromise which subsequently failed because they weren't prepared to take it to the next step which was putting the  OA between the frames.


 

Hmmm ..... I'm all about labour costs and work ..... we seem to have way too much Mahe Mahe .  From the experience of putting in strips , shop towels are really quick , but I will bow to superior knowledge that sometimes the quickest is not the best.  The shop towels are all out now for the spring. We'll do an alchohol wash at the end of September and make a non corporate decision as to what to do next then i guess. 

PS I want to be  a lazy person

Edited by jamesc
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Forgive me Brothers for the torrent of communication, but being home alone gives one time to think..... and I was thinking about the honey I packed today. Not a lot , 50 500gms in about an hour. The Missus was giving me grief the other day about Stella sitting idle in the shed . She only gets cranked up for the long hauls over the hill or up North, or maybe South where ever the nectar might be. But  anyway, I put into context the other day. That Truck sitting in the shed really does'nt cost us anything.  $192 for a COF for the season equates to  a little under 20 500gm pots of honey in the Pop Up shop. Another 30 will cover the rego. In the scheme of things thats not too bad.

The point is, as I was trying to explain to the bank the other day, is that the return on capital from bees far surpasses most forms of agriculture .

We as an industry we need to keep that in the fore front of our minds as we cruise into another season of uncertainty of low prices. 

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

Forgive me Brothers for the torrent of communication, but being home alone gives one time to think..... and I was thinking about the honey I packed today. Not a lot , 50 500gms in about an hour. The Missus was giving me grief the other day about Stella sitting idle in the shed . She only gets cranked up for the long hauls over the hill or up North, or maybe South where ever the nectar might be. But  anyway, I put into context the other day. That Truck sitting in the shed really does'nt cost us anything.  $192 for a COF for the season equates to  a little under 20 500gm pots of honey in the Pop Up shop. Another 30 will cover the rego. In the scheme of things thats not too bad.

The point is, as I was trying to explain to the bank the other day, is that the return on capital from bees far surpasses most forms of agriculture .

We as an industry we need to keep that in the fore front of our minds as we cruise into another season of uncertainty of low prices. 

Interest and depreciation never sleep and are like leaks in a Honey drum.
 

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On 18/08/2018 at 9:06 PM, Oma said:

I’ve used: vapourising for a season, never got on top of the pms,  then towels for part of a season this gave very variable results some hives better than others, but always mites on the sticky boards.  Now gib tape Oa/GL staples.  The results with staples wins hands down, many hives with no mites on the boards at all. 

i was speaking at a hobbyist group today, a young fellow came up an says he has been placing rhubarb leaves across the tops of his frames, the bees chew it to remove it and so far he has low levels of varroa.  I told him to keep monitoring and keep a diary and keep an eye on the health of his hives. But I thought what a out of the box thinking from the lad.

Now for you scientific minded, I want to encourage this young fellow, so how can he set up a small experiment to test his rhubarb system. I hate rhubarb but this might change my mind.

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Rhubarb leaves have significant levels of oxalic acid in them Which is why they have some control over varoa

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How would the oxalic have an affect on varroa if it’s tied up in the leaf? 

 

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I have just put a leaf on one of my hives.

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Rhubarb leaves sound interesting as a natural varroa treatment. The risk would be treating with a sub lethal dose and creating stronger varroa. An experimental model would have to assess lethality of the leaf at different stages of its development by weight in relation to the volume of bees.

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The reason I only did it to one hive is I do not know how the bees will handle it.The opossum is the only animal that I know of that will eat the rhubarb to the crown and I do not want to kill the hive.

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1 minute ago, Bighands said:

The reason I only did it to one hive is I do not know how the bees will handle it.The opossum is the only animal that I know of that will eat the rhubarb to the crown and I do not want to kill the hive.

A table on Wikipedia showed parsley as having the highest concentration .

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1 hour ago, Bighands said:

The reason I only did it to one hive is I do not know how the bees will handle it.The opossum is the only animal that I know of that will eat the rhubarb to the crown and I do not want to kill the hive.

My chooks eat our rhubarb till even the crown has gone... little beggars 

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1 hour ago, Bighands said:

The reason I only did it to one hive is I do not know how the bees will handle it.The opossum is the only animal that I know of that will eat the rhubarb to the crown and I do not want to kill the hive.

 

No you wouldn't want to kill the hive but the off the shelf oxalis acid treatment must have a level of mortality. If you aren't hitting this number you aren't dosing to the required level to avoid resistance.

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I'm not sure resistance is an issue with the acids. Certainly hasn't been overseas with oxalic anyway. 

 

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1 hour ago, Apihappy said:

 

No you wouldn't want to kill the hive but the off the shelf oxalis acid treatment must have a level of mortality. If you aren't hitting this number you aren't dosing to the required level to avoid resistance.

 

1 hour ago, Apihappy said:

 

No you wouldn't want to kill the hive but the off the shelf oxalis acid treatment must have a level of mortality. If you aren't hitting this number you aren't dosing to the required level to avoid resistance.

Got a friend to weigh 10 leaves today and they came to 800 grams, (very subjective I know) so each leaf is 80gm. Rhubarb has between 0.5-1.0 gm/100 gm oxalic acid in leaves.

So each leaf has 0.4-0.8gm oxalic. The leaves were small an 3 would cover the top of the box, so that would be 1.2-2.4 gm per treatment. When I dribble I use 54 grms in 50/50 sugar/water mix that makes 1.7 ltrs, which is a dose of 50mls x34 hives, so each hive is getting 1.6 grms/box. Don't rely on my maths, the nuns never did either.

So the young lad may have now saved the bee industry and the rhubarb industry.

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How is the oxalic released from the leaf and how are mites affected by it?

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1 hour ago, frazzledfozzle said:

How is the oxalic released from the leaf and how are mites affected by it?

 

I guess the bees chew the leaf away, this spreads the oxalic

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