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August 2018 Apiary Diary


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1 hour ago, Goran said:

We use to say for it in polite manner - meadow pie.. To don't be off topic even is irrelevant for NZ, we still have wet summer, almost every day heavy showers or so. On Sunday was whole day somewhat autumn rain ( still in summer). Temps dropped in a couple days for about 20C, even in Slovenian Alps was snowing.. Yesterday temp started to rise, and for now without rain.

Bees when look at them, are so calm, no need even for a smoke. Yesterday I gave honey for couple colonies and there were no trials of robbing even is forage scarce, last week they were trying to get in open feeder.. I have subjective feeling that bees are in some shock ..

Hornets are still attacking, wasp numbers are increasing, but so far seems colonies cope with that. I am so glad that I left lime honey to them ( not much to extract but now seems necessary reserve for them in such weird weather).

Is all the rain saturated the nectar flows and lowered the sugar concentration .

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God no . I was the hippie that wanted an automatic washing in the 70s . I was pretty much excommunicated by my group as a technology sympathiser.

I went back to check my hakea hives today to see if the queen that mated at the beginning of winter was laying worker brood . And  She was . There was no sign of the

I see you were out & about today @yesbut

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13 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Is all the rain saturated the nectar flows and lowered the sugar concentration .

 

I can't say. There are some minor flows in bushes and in white clover, as I can see they bring decent amount of pollen, but yet again looking in the frames they aren't storing much of it - believe a lot used for brood. Looking when they return to hive with bottoms down, so they find some but not wow. Strange to me they don't work hard on honey arches, brood flat on the frame, at this time they should.. Although they mostly decrease brooding sharp, from 8-9 frames to 4-5 frames. As are they now in winter configuration ( brood box up; empty box/stores and empty comb down), they now started to store pollen in bottom box below brood frames, this might be sign they are willing to move brood nest down or they will move it up later - will see..

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2 minutes ago, Goran said:

 

I can't say. There are some minor flows in bushes and in white clover, as I can see they bring decent amount of pollen, but yet again looking in the frames they aren't storing much of it - believe a lot used for brood. Looking when they return to hive with bottoms down, so they find some but not wow. Strange to me they don't work hard on honey arches, brood flat on the frame, at this time they should.. Although they mostly decrease brooding sharp, from 8-9 frames to 4-5 frames. As are they now in winter configuration ( brood box up; empty box/stores and empty comb down), they now started to store pollen in bottom box below brood frames, this might be sign they are willing to move brood nest down or they will move it up later - will see..

How was your season ....?

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

How was your season ....?

 

Odd.. Started awesome with spring crop higher than ever, black locust started and was threatened with bad weather but it came out after all below normal avg but I must be satisfied.. Lime was decent and than disastrous weather hit hard and I didn't touch even a drop of lime honey, I left to them to they can cope with such weather. Seems right decision, since they had at the end of July/beginning of August 8-9 frames of brood, what is OK for me..

Honey not sold, slowly on the doorstep..

Since a lot of people abandoned beekeeping ( not to mention country itself), in spring no one wanted to buy colonies and I didn't sell any. At that time all the hardware was occupied, I had no much place to maneuver and was distracted also with hazels, pay job and such.. Some number manage to swarm ( mostly in mid black locust forage) and I let them mostly go , even I some manage to expand - but not enough hardware, time and finances.. Not to mention value of bees and honey went down at that time - below economic value. In spring, if I remain here I think of doing " dierzon diamond rule", or merging colonies into 2queen system.. So far I am leaning to dierzon, even it would be mass queen dethroning..

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10 hours ago, Goran said:

. In spring, if I remain here I think of doing " dierzon diamond rule", or merging colonies into 2queen system.. So far I am leaning to dierzon, even it would be mass queen dethroning..

My neighbour does that. It's where all my swarms come about three weeks later.

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7 hours ago, yesbut said:

My neighbour does that. It's where all my swarms come about three weeks later.

 

He left too many qcells? There are many pros and cons, have winter to weigh all.. Goal is to reduce obligations with bees, kill the swarming and target forage is black locust.. 

 

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On 26/08/2018 at 8:53 AM, Jose Thayil said:

The thing one has to be careful of is that there are always two sides to a story ..... maybe the workers were on salaries and had worked way more hours and were being taken for a ride .... maybe they had been promised a bonus and it never eventuated ...... maybe ......

The important thing as a Boss is to remember  that when staff issues occur and  you don't want to end up in court you have to be squeaky clean, take a chill pill  and do everything by the book, no matter how galling that might be at the time.  Only then can you walk away and smile. Trust me ..... I know !

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2 minutes ago, Daniel Benefield said:

We had one down a big slip yesterday and now these two tonight. Only started lambing a few days ago. Might need to drive through the paddocks with my eyes closed now..

Just buy some more Ecrotec frames ??

Word is there is demand for lambs this year 

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3 minutes ago, Markypoo said:

My lot started lambing two months earlier than normal and are nearly finished. Normally start first week of October. One of my wiltshires had triplets then got mastitis in one udder so I have been topping them up.triplets.thumb.jpg.4bb0c0ab87da694a6b149acdad24a071.jpg

Nice ?. Ours are Wiltshire’s 

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16 minutes ago, M4tt said:

Nice ?. Ours are Wiltshire’s 

 I moved up to Timaru at the end of 2013. Trying to buy breeding stock was a pain as I was competing with the butchers for prime ewes at auction. I started out with Suffolks but found their feet an issue. I swapped some hay for a couple of texels, then got a trio of wiltshires.  I currently have 4 wilties, 3 suffolk/texel crosses, 2 texels and 2 texel/wiltshire crosses. Quite pleased as the texel/wiltshire crosses still shed around crutch and belly. The suffolks are all going in the freezer. Sick of shearing and the wiltshires are drench free (as they all are). 

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1 hour ago, M4tt said:

Just buy some more Ecrotec frames ??

Word is there is demand for lambs this year 

Will be interesting to see how the price for lambs go this season. Mum just sold 27 last seasons lambs at the sales yard and averaged $228!!!

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9 hours ago, Jo Jo said:

Will be interesting to see how the price for lambs go this season. Mum just sold 27 last seasons lambs at the sales yard and averaged $228!!!

Wow !!! That is awesome 

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I put maqs in the hive yesterday, this morning the girls were awfully quiet, a few dozen dead bees in front of the hive... I checked them, there are survivors inside but they're shocked and that is for sure.

No wonder, that maqs thing is very strong, even the how-to-use paper in the pail was eye wateringly strong. The trays under the hive (the sliding ones) were full of dead varroa. I cleaned the entrance, movement strated but still very quiet. I really hope I did not kill this hive but the varroa infestation was too risky to let it go, I had to do something quick.

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12 hours ago, Jo Jo said:

Will be interesting to see how the price for lambs go this season. Mum just sold 27 last seasons lambs at the sales yard and averaged $228!!!

Was trying to buy some calves for the school farm a couple of weeks ago. Saw a pile of ram lambs fresh off the boat from the Chathams go for $185. And they were rough looking romney cross things.

 

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7 minutes ago, Gabor said:

I put maqs in the hive yesterday, this morning the girls were awfully quiet, a few dozen dead bees in front of the hive... I checked them, there are survivors inside but they're shocked and that is for sure.

No wonder, that maqs thing is very strong, even the how-to-use paper in the pail was eye wateringly strong. The trays under the hive (the sliding ones) were full of dead varroa. I cleaned the entrance, movement strated but still very quiet. I really hope I did not kill this hive but the varroa infestation was too risky to let it go, I had to do something quick.

 

Oxalic acid staples. I have not used a synthetic miticide yet but certainly didn't see deaths like that when I saw the light and made up some staples instead of vaporising. Even put some in my topbar.

 

 

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Just now, Markypoo said:

Oxalic acid staples.

That is going to be the next step. I made the staples already and have all chemicals at hand but that is a slower, longer lasting method. I needed a quick knockdown unfortunately, the autumn bayvarol treatment apparently left a varroa there. The amount of dead mite is terrifying. 

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