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Jean MacDonald

Objections, obstacles and obligations for using alternative hive types in NZ

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10 hours ago, Sailabee said:

I have no problem with 'alternative hive designs' when tried by experienced beekeepers, but what rips my ration book is a new beek who has been sold the idea that something other than a Langstroth is easier to learn on. When it all turns to custard, it's those of us who are not just there to make money out of the new beeks who are left trying to resolve the problems in the 'superior hive design' and often, the results of ineffective alternative varroa treatment. @Jean MacDonald, one of the leading women in the Sun Hives is on FB Women in Beekeeping, and she rejoices in her bees sending out as many swarms as possible - not just to capture and manage - thank God she is in the USA, she is barking mad in kiwi terms. She runs expernsive classes to show how to make the skeps which she covers with fresh cowpats - bizarre but entertaining from my point of view!

Ah good cos I thought it looked like a swarm factory and the one in that video was at a residential school for autistic children. It gets worse of course as was originally designed by a sculptor. They certainly look lovely but "face in hands" not kind to bees at the very least and a swarm in a classroom of children...sigh.

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5 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Palmie must be an awful place. Or are you talking about Trev ?

Nope...me lol. Take after my Dad I'm told.

 

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33 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Palmie must be an awful place. Or are you talking about Trev ?

Yes.

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27 minutes ago, Jean MacDonald said:

Nope...me lol. Take after my Dad I'm told.

 

Yes.  I agree here also.  ?

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17 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

 Do you think it’s worth the extra time involved if scraping?

Yes, always have a large screwtop container to put scrapings in with me  - was taught it's bad practice to leave near the hive - minor AFB risk, and as there are a lot of pine trees near some of my hives, worth using the free Arataki propolis mats - they restrict the building on burr comb on tops of the frames in the top box as they fill up the mat with propolis instead, and each nets at least $10 each , so will worth the time to collect. The bought Beetek mats collect about one and a half times the propolis.

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1 hour ago, frazzledfozzle said:

Thanks @Sailabee that’s good info.

how many times on average would you be able to harvest a mat 

Usually once a year.

I have beetek mats on all my hives and I only harvest the mats once a year or when they are full.

I send my propolis to Manuka Health along with my box/frame scrapings.   Manuka Health pay for the freight both ways.  I always get my own mats back.

Propolis pays for all my varroa treatments.

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2 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

Thanks @Sailabee that’s good info.

how many times on average would you be able to harvest a mat 

Generally once a year. I think that most up here found they got more dosh from Arataki, and they return the clean Beetek mats, and replace their own ones as part of the deal.

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On 31/07/2018 at 10:25 PM, kaihoka said:

But people of been keeping bees for 100s of years in what in NZ  would be  illegal hives and they must have worked ok for them .

How did bees stay alive without removable frames .

 

afaik it didn't work well.

one of the reasons for the frames to be inspected rule was that people would use any bit of rubbish to put bees into. then cut it open take the honey and leave it to die.

this of course meant afb was a big problem.

it worked in the sense of they got honey, they just killed a lot of hives doing it.

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14 minutes ago, tristan said:

 

afaik it didn't work well.

one of the reasons for the frames to be inspected rule was that people would use any bit of rubbish to put bees into. then cut it open take the honey and leave it to die.

this of course meant afb was a big problem.

it worked in the sense of they got honey, they just killed a lot of hives doing it.

By which time the bees had swarmed out setting up a "feral" hive which would swarm. Some of those swarms would get caught and get put in some container not fit for it's original purpose such as a basket, tin or barrel. Could tempted to play devil's advocate here but with commercial beekeepers at the time having losses and an elemental understanding of germ theory the inspectable, moveable frame, flammable hive was made the only legal hive to keep. Wonder what new pest we will get as small hive beetle looks like a nightmare from a management perspective. Hearing they will head down two stories from a university lab to find dirt to pupate in wasn't reassuring but some in the US are using nematodes in the soil below the hive to deal with them as part of their IPM. 

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On 31/07/2018 at 6:38 PM, kaihoka said:

@Trevor Gillbanks @Kiwi Bee there is often criticism of hive designs .

But it seems that the problem with these hives is that bees are so domesticated that they can not survive without us .

And I wonder if there were no pests and diseases what would the most practical user friendly hive would be like .

and....maybe they have so many pests and diseases because of us and our unfriendly hives....and maybe especially because of us, or rather the -icides we seem to be so fond of.

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Hi Mischief, how is the hive now? From memory I think it's around 3 weeks since you put the apivar strip in it? If it is still alive 3 weeks after the strip went in, it should slowly start to recover provided it has a survivable number of bees. But do not remove the strip yet.

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Yes, of course it is still alive and no i will not remove the strip until it has been in there for the recommended time-duly noted on my calendar.

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1 minute ago, mischief said:

Yes, of course it is still alive and no i will not remove the strip until it has been in there for the recommended time-duly noted on my calendar.

Did you only need one strip in your hive.?

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On 31/07/2018 at 8:51 PM, Trevor Gillbanks said:

 

 

Yes.  Unless you make your apiary seasonal and then delete it for a couple of weeks at the correct time.   Then re register the site later. (not sure of the dates required)

29 days, but if you you harvest honey for sale from it then no minimum 

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On 30/07/2018 at 11:37 PM, Jean MacDonald said:

Discussion or challenge? Find your own to discuss or defend. 

 

couldn't careless what type of hive you want to play with, as long as the frames/brood can be checked for AFB and are.

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38 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

couldn't careless what type of hive you want to play with, as long as the frames/brood can be checked for AFB and are.

+1

 

however i really dislike a lot of the complete BS claims that many alternative hives are sold by. plus they target non-beekeepers who don't know any better.

for an experienced beek, no problem as they know what they are in for. its the scamming of beginners that annoys me.

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