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Anatomy of a Mite Crash


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Sure. But not everyone reads the news, and what's old to you, is new to someone else.   Because I interact with a lot of beekeepers, a constant thing I see every year is people thinking thei

Found this post on Beesource, written by user Grozzie2, a Canadian beekeeper. It is stuff that every beekeeper needs to have a good understanding of, and is a very well written piece. So with Grozzie'

Great eye site to see a mites sausage

All the above is old news but I  would would have thought  a beekeeper would have this knowledge. This is the problem people out there running hives with very little knowledge pouring money into a venture set to fail.

We are going to have huge problems in the next year's with pest and disease because of poor management ,skill and little knowledge 

There's so many so call beekeeper  out there giving  advice  and new guys they are taking it all on board  this is going to end  very bad for us all.

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2 hours ago, Alastair said:

I see every year is people thinking their hive in autumn is looking great.

Yeah, the big trap
I always tell new people that just when everything looks really good, panic because you have a month

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

ok .... so I'm panicing because everything looks good . Did some sugar shakes this morning and not a sausage of a mite.

Get a grip, you are letting paranoia get the better of ya.....BUT, what about the colonies you didn't look at???

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Fall mite infestation in our part of the world I refer to as the "Musical Chair Syndrome". Watch for this external beehive pattern...bees shifting from one entrance to another...not like robbing but more like an orientation flight. At the end of each day, the music stops...but only to start up the next day with one hive less that is attractive to the bees. Then when the process is nearing the end they ( the unaffected bees I suspect) have found the hive they have the best chances of surviving winter in. This could be your neighboring beekeeper's clean hives or one of your own. Huge early fall field forces mysteriously disappear in this whole process. 

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19 hours ago, David Yanke said:

Get a grip, you are letting paranoia get the better of ya.....BUT, what about the colonies you didn't look at???

Yep ..... got a grip .... life is what it is  and dead hives  are a part of live hives. After all, you need somewhere to put brood to take the fizz out of swarmers   ..... but we plan to go to work a little earlier this year after a mild winter. 

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35 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Yep ..... got a grip .... life is what it is  and dead hives  are a part of live hives. After all, you need somewhere to put brood to take the fizz out of swarmers   ..... but we plan to go to work a little earlier this year after a mild winter. 

Like with Livestock there is always dead stock.  I wasn't  having a go before, just a failed attempt at humour on my part.

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1 hour ago, David Yanke said:

Like with Livestock there is always dead stock.  I wasn't  having a go before, just a failed attempt at humour on my part.

No no ... very humorous ?

 

1 hour ago, yesbut said:

Aha...new shed done, table polished, hole dug, boredom sets in.....

?

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48 minutes ago, Russ said:

We always need to be reminded, otherwise we will be moaning about all the dead hives ?.

This is the problem you have to be reminded of ?

I would have thought  a beekeeper would have been thinking and looking  all the time  for count varroa to working out when a treatment  is need . What's the point in counting varroa if you don't know the maths to work out how many varroa in the hive  and at what point to treat. 

Does any one know how many varroa can be a hive before you treat ?

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5 hours ago, Beeman1 said:

Does any one know how many varroa can be a hive before you treat ?

In an alcohol wash of 300-500 bees  3 mites is a concern to me

5 or 6 will ruin my day and 10-20 is an absolute cat kicking disaster 

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