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July 2018 Beekeeping Diary


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The cluster in my hive is slightly larger this year compared to its first winter, going by the debris on the sticky board.

They are still flying most days- later start on the frosty mornings, orientation flights still going on around 2-3pm and tucked up in bed by 4.30-5.

Heaps of feed. They are still on frames 3-4-5-6 according to the sticky board-gotta love em.

Its a long hive with a later feeder frame installed for just in case.

Condensation on the far end where that frame is but nothing at all showing on the window at the entrance end where the cluster is.

Cluster on the sun side, just above the entrance way at the moment.

Still got the robber screen on- thats pretty much permanent and still got that bit of wood reducing the top of that down to an inch.

There was a wasp in the hive last week, which shocked me, I thought they were dormant this time of year.

Night check on how they sound= nice and peaceful ....so far, so good

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It is different in taste, but rarely I get pure lime. It always come with blackberries, tree of heaven, honeydew - in various ratios. It is to me nice, I like it that mixed way. Pure lime is also nice

couldn't play with the girls today so did the next best thing...wax work. Molds from Lyson, very easy to use.

No idea what the bees are doing ..... we have gone onto 8.30 starts as it's too darn cold to hit the shed at 7.30 and have gone into building mode ..... building a smoko room so we have a place for te

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14 hours ago, Markypoo said:

 

And because drones only inherit one of each of the 16 pairs of chromosomes, which are randomly assorted, there will be yellow drones with more carniolan genes than others and vice versa for the dark ones. Just to complicate it even further, crossing over can occur where bits of chromosomes break off and attach to others. So pretty much every bee is genetically unique.

 

http://www.glenn-apiaries.com/principles.html

 

http://www.killowen.com/genetics6.html

 

Showing crossing over

http://www.killowen.com/genetics4.html

 

I am thinking I should offer a genetics unit to my Year 13 class and they can examine variation within a hive as an example! That could be fun, measuring variation in drones from a carni queen open mated to italians and carnis.

 

Edit = This is aimed at everyone even though I quoted David

Good info, but especially important on this forum, is to remember that unique in this case doesn't infer more diversity.  No new alleles are created during  Meiosis.  Those 'bits' are lengths of DNA coding for one or more genes, and they swap instead of breaking off and attaching to others-  In the end we still end up with 16 complete chromosomes in a single strand.  The gamete(egg or sperm) formed from this single strand carries only a single allele for each of the 5000 genes of the Honey Bee genome.  So in the case of semen,  a drone  being haploid, carries only one allele for each each gene, and then it replicates that  copy maybe up to  a million times in the spermatazoa it produces.  So each drones source carries relatively little genetic variation which is just another of the many barriers making stock improvement in honey bees difficult.

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7 hours ago, David Yanke said:

Good info, but especially important on this forum, is to remember that unique in this case doesn't infer more diversity.  No new alleles are created during  Meiosis.  Those 'bits' are lengths of DNA coding for one or more genes, and they swap instead of breaking off and attaching to others-  In the end we still end up with 16 complete chromosomes in a single strand.  The gamete(egg or sperm) formed from this single strand carries only a single allele for each of the 5000 genes of the Honey Bee genome.  So in the case of semen,  a drone  being haploid, carries only one allele for each each gene, and then it replicates that  copy maybe up to  a million times in the spermatazoa it produces.  So each drones source carries relatively little genetic variation which is just another of the many barriers making stock improvement in honey bees difficult.

Correct, but it will explain why a hybrid queen will not just produce a straight carniolan or italian drone. She could be, and she could also be making drones that at 80% or 95% or 99% of one or the other. I have seen an argument on other forums (American) where breeders are insisting that if they use a yellow drone from a hybrid queen for AI, then it would be a pure italian drone. It is not necessarily so, and the pedantic biology teacher in me can't help but correct them. Since I get so much good info from here I also like providing some.

 

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2 hours ago, Markypoo said:

Correct, but it will explain why a hybrid queen will not just produce a straight carniolan or italian drone. She could be, and she could also be making drones that at 80% or 95% or 99% of one or the other. I have seen an argument on other forums (American) where breeders are insisting that if they use a yellow drone from a hybrid queen for AI, then it would be a pure italian drone. It is not necessarily so, and the pedantic biology teacher in me can't help but correct them. Since I get so much good info from here I also like providing some.

 

You are right, it only means the yellow drone has the main body gene coding for yellow body colour.  The yellow gene is dominant over the dark gene. In honey bees body colour is determined by a single gene with a few other genes having a more minor modifying influence.  When you are trying to get you head around this forget about chromosomes- they are just structures of DNA, and try to think of the Honey Bee genome as a great long length of DNA along which all 5000 genes stretch.  A gene is a length of DNA that codes for a certain protein.  When the 'crossing over' swap occurs, it is sections of DNA containing 1 or many more whole genes  swapping places along that long strand of DNA with sections of another single strand of DNA lying close to it.  So in drones because they a haploid they express whatever allele for each gene they have inherited.  With body colour it is an either yellow or dark  with some modification from from whatever allele they have for each of the genes that play a much more minor role in determining body colour.  Yellow is  dominant, but this doesn't matter in the haploid drones. So no, you cannot, like on an artists palette mix up any colour you like in drones ,with racially characteristics it is a different story.  Going back to that image of that superceded  queen, her daughter, and those drones. Those drones were the old girls drones, at this time of year there are virtually no drones to drift, there is a possibility  laying workers were involved, but most likely they were hers.  She developed from an egg that carried the yellow allele, and that egg was fertilised by a spermatozoa that carried the dark gene, when she produced eggs that developed into drones they would either carry the yellow body gene or the dark body colour gene with some influence from the minor modifying genes, and that is what the image shows. 

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Correct @David Yanke, almost all those drones are the old girls with the possible exception of drift earlier on . She is a prolific producer  of both worker and drone eggs and there aren’t laying workers involved . 

 

So the minor modifying genes you refer to presumably alter the colour ? ie black or very black , yellow , very yellow or dark yellow and so forth in drones ? 

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My 100m Rifle Range mound is smack in the middle of a site of 20 singles

so today while parked in the middle of the site shooting across the bonnet of the truck I was able to watch the site work the Heather

Truckloads of pollen and Boxes heavy as leads

These winter Hives are putting on weight while the ground is still frozen in places 

This season coming is already shaping up to be my best yet.

Bring it on I say 

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17 hours ago, kaihoka said:

@jamesc obviously not a football fan then  James .

The beautifull game .... it was  just a long time to sit through to get to a score of 1:1  ..... and then the overtime so I went out to do some gib stopping , only to hear the poms -we- lost. Hrummph

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3 hours ago, jamesc said:

The beautifull game .... it was  just a long time to sit through to get to a score of 1:1  ..... and then the overtime so I went out to do some gib stopping , only to hear the poms -we- lost. Hrummph

Are you a pom ?

You are not whinging one are you .

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Opened some lids today,  just because I wanted to know who is still alive. Just a quick snapshot.  Didn't pull any frames,  just lifted some bases to gauge the weight. 

Was pleasantly surprised by the amount of pollen coming in. 

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went through 2 sites over last 2 days, all hives except 1 making honey, pollen coming in flat out, dont know what it is coming in, some manuka in flower and gorse but cant spot much else, hopefully other 2 sites are the same, a couple looking like  needing an extra box in the next fortnight looking at brood numbers

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managed to get a look in the hives on saturday, was quite surprised by the findings.

On hive I thought was very quiet and i suspected no one was home anymore, was actually doing fine, even brood in it, which does surprise me... the hives just dont seem to want to shut up shop this year.... frosts on the ground and all! Second one I checked had even more brood so I didnt delve too deep into the other 3.

They are all fairly clustered though and mostly quiet compared with when I tried to look in them two weeks ago and gave up after looking at the first one and they were all over me.

Gave them all an oxalic dribble as i wont be able to get back to them until early sept and just want to tide them over a bit until i get treatments in then.

One was a bit light on stores (and it was earlier as well) so i might give them some feed to tide them over, the others are still heavy with honey.... i left them heaps as I had far too much this year. They are all clustered in the middle 3/4 box and in the top honey box.... Im thinking they wont move far and I wonder if we are gonna have a real winter or not this year?

Think I feel happy to leave them now and head to usa for a month, woopeeeeee

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On 16/07/2018 at 7:42 AM, Rashika said:

Im thinking they wont move far and I wonder if we are gonna have a real winter or not this year?

 

If anything I think it’s been colder - at least according to the MetService. Have a look down the bottom of the page (historic data). That said, my temperature gauge outside the house doesn’t ever match what the MetService says has happened or is going to happen.

 

https://www.metservice.com/towns-cities/christchurch/christchurch-city

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Today I went to check the frame of eggs I had put in my queenless hive two weeks ago .

I found no queen cells but I found fresh eggs and capped brood and a new laying queen .

I know it is not the old queen because this queen was not marked.

I am trying to work out where she came from.

In The queen right hive I got the eggs from I had seen a virgin on another occasion but when I was looking for eggs to transfer I could not see her and thought she must have flown off and got lost.

Maybe I transferred her on the frame of eggs and did not notice .

I had put the  old queen aside in a nuc box when I was looking for eggs .

Would a queenless hive accept another queen so easily .

Could the virgin have gone for a flight and gone into the wrong hive.

And how the hell did she mate at this time of year.

It will not be a good mating . But the brood does not look like drone brood .

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