Jump to content
Jeff Twigge

Document Waxed Plastic Frames

Recommended Posts

Hi all. new here so bear with me. I'm a hobbyist that is looking to expand. looking to buy a couple of pallets of plastic frames but unsure which way to go. 2 options is to buy pre-waxed frames from Ecroteck or Ceracell or to buy the blank frames and wax myself - buying the wax in from a reputable beekeeper. Here is my dilemma - I've never had AFB and want to minimize the risk, so my question is am I more at risk of contracting AFB from buying pre-waxed frames (from wax that came from who knows where?); or waxing myself from a credible source? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Jeff Twigge said:

am I more at risk of contracting AFB from buying pre-waxed frames (from wax that came from who knows where?); or waxing myself from a credible source? 

Wax is held to be a very low AFB risk. Welcome to the forum.  9_9

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome along @Jeff Twigge As @yesbut has said, wax is very low risk.  Possibly just as expensive whichever way you go.  Pre waxed frames are what they are and no work load.

Un waxed frames are cheaper but you need to buy in the wax and then do all the work of waxing the frames. What is your labour unit costings.

I prefer to wax my own frames as I put on more wax and I have my own wax.  You are saying you have to buy the wax in @ around $20 plus Kg.

Here is how I do it.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When we wax (dip in molten wax) frames we get approx 120grams on each frame, Ecroteck or Ceracell's frames are sprayed with mix of wax & an oil (probably canola). Ecroteck's pre-waxed frames are now better than they once were, but I'm uneasy as to whether the 30g is enough.  I have seen that if the coating of wax on the frame is very thin the comb & honey will easily peel of the plastic frame. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Julian_Taverner said:

When we wax (dip in molten wax) frames we get approx 120grams on each frame, Ecroteck or Ceracell's frames are sprayed with mix of wax & an oil (probably canola). Ecroteck's pre-waxed frames are now better than they once were, but I'm uneasy as to whether the 30g is enough.  I have seen that if the coating of wax on the frame is very thin the comb & honey will easily peel of the plastic frame. 

do you get any problems with frame warping when dipping plastic frames?

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

17 hours ago, Julian_Taverner said:

When we wax (dip in molten wax) frames we get approx 120grams on each frame, Ecroteck or Ceracell's frames are sprayed with mix of wax & an oil (probably canola). Ecroteck's pre-waxed frames are now better than they once were, but I'm uneasy as to whether the 30g is enough.  I have seen that if the coating of wax on the frame is very thin the comb & honey will easily peel of the plastic frame. 

 

Hi @Julian_Taverner, just to let you know our frames are sprayed with 100% beeswax that is melted at very high temperatures and sprayed directly on :)

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I purchased 40 plastic frames about six years ago. These frames were sold as waxed, but when I received them, some were not completely coated and 6 had no wax on them at all. I now stick to wooden frames with wax foundation.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a real problem with plastic frames probably unfounded but I hate the idea of all that plastic being in a hive. 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jeff. I've seen the precoated frames from local beekeeping supplier sand I'm not happy with the amount sprayed on (30g). So I decided to do my own, I put on approximately 70g per frame (fd) using a medium strand paint roller. I have done 600 in one day, but that was a long day. I would recommend rolling rather than dipping as you would use far less wax. 

In the past I've had hobbyists complain to me about the precoated frames that they have bought from beekeeping suppliers, stating that the bees stripped off the wax coating and used the wax elsewhere in the box to draw frames. The bees will do this 1/ if they aren't on a very good flow, the bees will do 'housekeeping' rather than drawing all comb and 2/ if the coating is so thin that they cannot draw from it, they would rather clean it off and not use some frames. I have seen the bees put honey up the warm side of a box of plastic foundation and the other side stripped bare of wax. 

If you have looked at the video above it will give you a pretty good idea on how to do it on a small scale. Don't have the wax too hot, otherwise your frame will warp and the coating will be too thin. I have my wax at a temperature where it burns the skin (if splashed) but does not leave a mark. Sorry but I don't use a temperature gauge.

  • Agree 1
  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started out dipping but dont anymore... when one is paying $20+ per kg of wax I cant handle the wasted wax and the coating on the sides and bottom seems to make the bees more likely to build brace comb onto the sides of the box.... Which isnt fun....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I roll on the wax on my frames. I do 18-ish frames from 1kg of wax.

I have the wax quiet hot and I do one side of 10-ish frames. Meanwhile the first frame will cool down and I do the other side of each frame - this technique prevents warping.

 

Many years ago - before the manuka madness - I got pre-waxed frames from Ceracell and there were some chunks of wax at the ends of the top bars and I had the opportunity to see that the wax was not a nice yellow wax. Also the bee needed ages to start working on them. So I switched back to wax my own.

 

Also @Jeff Twiggeyou will find that many bkpers here will recommend to expand with a more moderate speed. The safest way is to use your own wax however I was in the situation when I had to buy blind too.

  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone.

Have been waxing my own (by roller) and will continue to do so after reading feedback.

Buying wax in from a reliable source. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...