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1 minute ago, jamesc said:

 

We have a good supply of floro vests to cover the H&S aspects of drinking coffee on a wobbly floor, and a one eyed floor sweeper should cover it.

Nup,

Eliminate, Isolate or Minimize 

You may have to lock the door and isolate the Hazard.

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I am a personal friend of Frank and Mary-Ann Lyndsey.  Neither Frank nor Mary-Ann are members of this beekeeping forum. Frank has been informed of this thread and has asked me to post his re

It is perfectly legal to use bayvarol while honey supers are on (except for comb honey) in an emergency situation i.e. when there are varoa. How much varoa comes from neighbours and how much comes fro

What a load of crap. If you are spending 80% of your time battling varroa, then you need to spend a lot more time  with someone who has 49 years experience. With bees, your wisdom grows with every yea

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4 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Uh Huh .... the good lord loves a trier? mind you, you are up in the lucky country, so it might work.

Ill post a pic here each week till August, 

Ive got more of those little Honey frames full of Honey than I know what to do with so  might throw a couple in.

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3 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Ill post a pic here each week till August, 

Ive got more of those little Honey frames full of Honey than I know what to do with so  might throw a couple in.

Good idea ..... knowledge is power. But seriously, up where you are the climate may be a little bit kinder. Down here I'm wintering some poly's but not really holding my breathe .... except that the daffodils are flowering right now and we generally start raising queen cells when the daffs appear.

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5 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Good idea ..... knowledge is power. But seriously, up where you are the climate may be a little bit kinder. Down here I'm wintering some poly's but not really holding my breathe .... except that the daffodils are flowering right now and we generally start raising queen cells when the daffs appear.

This place is hell this Autumn.
The Autumn has been long and mild and up here that equals hungry Hives.
Its got cooler of late and Ill probably put a full newspaper under that little nuc's lid but If it wasnt being given honey each week it would have starved

I put Honey in a shallow dish under the hive mat (AFB safe Honey )

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1 minute ago, Philbee said:

This place is hell this Autumn.
The Autumn has been long and mild and up here that equals hungry Hives.
Its got cooler of late and Ill probably put a full newspaper under that little nuc's lid but If it wasnt being give honey each week it would have starved

I put Honey in a shallow dish under the hive mat (AFB safe Honey )

Yo .... a mild autumn keeps you on your toes. It's too easy to become complacent and walk way to Mexico for six weeks, but the times are a changing and I see us delving into beehives for eleven months of the year shortly.

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11 hours ago, Philbee said:

Here is an example of what it's like to step back in time with regard Varroa.

This mini Nuc is alone in this quad set up and I brought it home into high density Hive country as a pet and because I no longer have the inclination to use these little Honey Brick type mating Nucs.
This nuc is situated right in the middle of 10-15 sites belonging to at least 3 Taupo/Rotorua Beeks, 4 counting me all within 2kms and it has been here since Christmas

It's the size of a Grapefruit and will march through winter.
This particular nuc has a mid season Queen.

winter mini in Varroa country.jpg

 

With that 20% of your day left over after your heroic battles with varroa, give that nuc a feed.

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

Not a lot of groceries in there either

Gosh, I remember such a remark a while ago.... 

Good luck with the concrete- be fine as long as it don't pour rain.  A few trowel marks add character and creates a non - slip surface for the precious workers making coffee or rushing in for the pen. 

Oh, is Dew- Nuka a goer?? 

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The unfortunate aspect of this thread is that one of us, a good man has his name attached.
It would be far better if the likes of this letter/ thread could have been anonymous and dissected objectively without the risk of becoming what could easily be viewed as a witch hunt or bullying.

Im not going to comment on the content of the letter but would suggest that members read it thoroughly and ask if the points raises are accurately reflected in their own operations.

In short, is it really and truly this bad out there and would these claims stand scrutiny as a submission if required to
 

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2 minutes ago, Kiwifruiter said:

ralitive tropics

Lol

Of course you are joking, right? 

This little Nuc is at 580m above sea level on Kawakawa ridge  which was aptly known by the early Ballot Farmers as "Battlers Ridge"

Exposed to the south, all our houses are of similar layout, designed to protect the occupants from the howling SSW ester 

 

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Back to resistant mites.  Where's John??  I sent some suspect mites to him and haven't heard, even followed up. Others also sent samples- any results. 

If resistant mites are so bad, then why don't we get positive resistant results?  There is lots of 'suspect' resistance but no real evidence as far as I gather. 

Certainly believe that some areas in NZ are over crowded and in dire situations.  

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2 hours ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

I am a personal friend of Frank and Mary-Ann Lyndsey. 

Neither Frank nor Mary-Ann are members of this beekeeping forum.

Frank has been informed of this thread and has asked me to post his reply to clarify both the radio interview and allegations made on this forum.

 

All true.
I had two sites I’d didn’t visit: grass up high, supers with rotted corners. These were the last in a days run and missed when you run out of time. The beekeeper was horrified at the condition but it was deliberate as someone had helped themselves to 5 two and three high hives but they leave them alone when left 5 high.
 
The site going into Wellington had to be abandoned.  Every Thursday a group of young guys had a party and their party trick was to see how many pallets of hives they could tip over. I didn’t realised they could see the apiary from above and when I camped out nothing happened. So one night I walked in along the railway line for a km and camped out and about midnight surprised them but couldn’t out run them.  So moved the apiary. About this time a new railway manager thought it was unsafe to cross the railway tracks even though I had been doing this for 20 years and could advise train control
 
The losses of 400 hives were due to resistant mites.  Dr Mark Goodwin has been warning about this for three years. Beekeepers failed to check that their treatments had worked after a treatment round was completed  One beekeeper sampling for bee exports found no change in mite numbers, swapped from bayvarol to apistan after a couple of weeks no change. Put on apiguard and mites fell. That beekeeper didn’t warn others so some suffered serious losses. 
 
I’m now getting resistant mites in sites close to those that move the hives around the country. Not in other sites. 6 strips in a hive and 10 % mites at the end of 6 weeks. Mite resistance is spreading. Be aware. I now used two treatments together and treat 4 times a year.
 
Last season I used Formic acid flash treatment starting in spring once a month. I started treating weekly from Christmas with Formic acid. By Feb/ March no mites in my hives.  IE alcohol washes and no mites dropping on slides under mesh bottom boards (All my hives have mesh bottom boards)
 
Mite bombs name created by Denis van Engelsdorp USA. Any hive dying from mites within a 2 kl of your hives will take out a whole apiary in a month. I tried this in 2001 when I got mites from a log coming down from Northland. I killed or sealed in all the ferals I could find except one, and when this died from mites, the mite fall in my hives 300 metres away was huge. I left strips in to protect the hives. Now this is unlikely to work.
 
So now every beekeeper is dependant of their neighbour.  Don’t allow hives to swarm as these will die from mites and be robbed creating a mite bomb. All treat together or else you have wasted money if just one beekeeper doesn’t.
 
AFB two reasons both beekeeper related. I was an AP2 and can pick a diseased hive when it’s just a couple of cell.   A Commercial beekeeper left 4 hives behind after moving 40 hives away. The hives in my apiary gradually got AFB.  I asked for these hives to be inspected. Free of disease yet I burnt nearly all the hives in two Apiaries. I was told but later the inspector had no sense of smell and didn’t like to wear glasses. So AFB spread. 
 
In other sites 2 or 3 AFB  in each apiary.   PMP would inspect and find disease in other beekeepers hives but no follow up next season so it would continue even though only new gear went on the apiaries. Last season commercials moved in around me. They got AFB but not me although one in the autumn ( over 200 hives now within 3km )  Left all spare boxes on hives as it easier to get rid of all gear when a hive gets AFB
 
Is AFB a problem. China has detected AFB spores in Canadian, Australian and now NZ honey yet we destroy all AFB hives and honey. What does that tell you.
 
Old at 70 year. Yes slower.  Used to have 480 hives but now down to 160. After varroa decimated my apiaries close to other beekeepers,  now back to 160 hives again.   Hives isolated still no mites at Christmas.  Old boxes yes as bees do not mind the condition of the box and you get twice the amount of propolis. However with high densities, bees will now rob if hives not closed down tight.
 
Lots of reports of hobby hives being robbed by the commercial hives 200 metres away. Some just after they opened the hives, some could be due to faulty or late treatment being robbed when bee numbers drop. One has wide open entranced - should have reduced them. Club now promotes robbing screens.
 
Too many hives yes. My production has halved in the last 7 years. Thought it was me but then did a walk around. Where I was the only commercial beekeeper, now some sites have 100 hives within 2 km. Bee hives slow to build.  Farming has changed. Scrub cleared, rotational grazing, nitrogen put on reducing clover. Clover cut before it flowers. Most commercials now feeding supplements to support hives. This is not sustainable beekeeping.
 
Frank

P.S  Frank doesn't belong to any forums as he write for the New Zealand beekeeper and with almost 50yrs of beekeeping and reading, research and attending both NZ and overseas conferences I think he is more informed than most on any forum.

Mary-Ann
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

I think it would be great if Frank was to join the forum and then he could share even more of his experience with us.

 

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All interesting stuff that Frank writes about.  I think I mentioned a while ago that when pulling the Apivar strips out over the last month I still noticed mites running around. Even if the strips had gone in late they should have worked ....???

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2 hours ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Dr Mark Goodwin has been warning about this for three years. 

more like seven years.

 

4 minutes ago, CraBee said:

Mite bombs name created by Denis van Engelsdorp USA. Any hive dying from mites within a 2 kl of your hives will take out a whole apiary in a month. I tried this in 2001 when I got mites from a log coming down from Northland. I killed or sealed in all the ferals I could find except one, and when this died from mites, the mite fall in my hives 300 metres away was huge. I left strips in to protect the hives. Now this is unlikely to work.

in my experience, while you do get reinvasion from dieing hives, if we had one hive wipe out a whole site we would not have bees left.

reality that i see, for eg a case where i know the hives that died, had 6 hives die due to poor treatment but our site just up the road had a few hives with pms but that was about it.

 

in 2001, the start of varroa in nz, the problem wasn't having just one hive die, it was having tons of wild hives dieing constantly and your hives constantly picked up varroa from that.

 

the problem with hives dieing from varroa and spreading it, unless its in big numbers, is that it gives the varroa a jump start. if you get a small amount of re-invasion after you have treated then they have plenty of time to build up before the next treatment.  can be really hard on the bees when they are running low brood and bee numbers.  

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