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Cow farmers AFB moment

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On 16/01/2020 at 3:27 PM, M4tt said:

As of January 15, 118 beef farms have tested positive. Almost all of these have had contact or movements associated with dairy farms, which is where the disease has been passed on from .


Testing of 2500 beef farms, which have no known contact with m Bovis , will begin this month . This will be done in conjunction with TB testing , and the tests will be run at Assure Quality labs, with an expected 3 week turnaround with results.

hope they identify the NAIT crims and throw the book at them.

if everyone had been NAIT compliant in the first place there would be almost nil issue, but the industry lobbied against enforcement by regulators...

sound familiar in a beekeeping context?

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16 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

hope they identify the NAIT crims and throw the book at them.

if everyone had been NAIT compliant in the first place there would be almost nil issue, but the industry lobbied against enforcement by regulators...

sound familiar in a beekeeping context?

I think there is some misunderstanding as to how nait works . It is a tool to track the movement of animals but offers zero protection against the movement of untested but infected animals. In @M4tt previous post he mentioned testing about to start for 2500 beef farms . That’s like not bothering to do AFB checks on all outfits that haven’t had a case lately because they are low risk . The reality is that with animals going from dairy farm to calf rearers, to traders , to finishers , the amount of potential for disease transfer is unreal , even with nait being fully complied with . Even in a semi closed beef breeding situation they will still be trading some cattle , so there’s always a risk there too . 

 

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6 hours ago, Jas said:

I think there is some misunderstanding as to how nait works . It is a tool to track the movement of animals but offers zero protection against the movement of untested but infected animals.

which allows animals originating from a farm to be traced and found, and problems isolated. But many people weren't using it as legally required...

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31 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

which allows animals originating from a farm to be traced and found, and problems isolated. But many people weren't using it as legally required...

 

Exactly - the orginators of the infection used the slack monitoring to spend 2 years intentionally spreading it to avoid detection - many in the industry know exactly where it all started - an extremely huge rich, powerful dairying family which had a head start and was extremely politically powerful - much like the timber treatment farce.

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8 hours ago, Jas said:

The reality is that with animals going from dairy farm to calf rearers, to traders , to finishers , the amount of potential for disease transfer is unreal , even with nait being fully complied with .

 

Thing about that is that if NAIT had been fully complied with, it would already be known which farms had brought in animals from infected farms, and which had not.

 

In such a scenario, the disease would probably already have been wiped off the face of New Zealand.

 

Course, NAIT has not been fully complied with, and in what seems like a massive scale of non compliance. The latest reading i have done on the issue says that MPI are looking at probably 10 more years to achieve complete eradication.

 

And then, it requires full cooperation from 100% of the people. But like beekeeping, there will almost certainly be a few non cooperative people with their own crazy ideas and theories who hide things and deliberately thwart control efforts.

 

 

 

Edited by Alastair
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1 hour ago, M4tt said:

but it’s a pig of a thing to drive 

Reporting is also useless.  You should be able to get a report on exactly what animals you have recorded at any point in time (like your bank account) but you can't.  You can only get a report on what you have as of today.  If you look at some farmer's NAIT records they could have animals on there that have been killed/died years ago.

 

Freezing works don't help either because all they require is a tag on the animal to process it so if it loses it when in transport the driver can simply get one out of the cab that he has picked up when cleaning his truck, put it on the animal, and everything is hunky dory.   

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3 hours ago, tommy dave said:

which allows animals originating from a farm to be traced and found, and problems isolated. But many people weren't using it as legally required...

I agree 100% about the tracing and finding the source animals , but say there is a six month delay,  and in the interim the receiving farm has onsold animals to multiple other farms , who are also buying and selling . You are continually playing catch up . 

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@Matt I agree when I was dairy farming 10 years ago we always had a cow with symptoms similar to M Bovis  so I'm sure it's been in nz for a while. Because it didn't seem to spread to the rest of the herd we didn't worry about it and the vets had no idea. I've just read in the local paper that a herd in Opotiki has been infected so I feel for the people involved having to destroy all their livestock. 😦

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Had a gentleman come up to me in the market today and ask what had caused the honey he had sent to him from Switzerland to granulate with very course crystals. Needless to say I questioned him further and told him it was illegal for honey to come into nz. He said it had been posted to him and customs had not stopped it and was happy to have got it in without detection. 🥺

Is it not detected as food by the mail screening process or are our border controls only interested in drugs?  

He said he consumed all the honey but it wasn’t very nice, and disposed of the container by burning it, then had to buy some Manuka honey at great expense to send back in return!

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8 hours ago, john berry said:

Making somebody a scapegoat for your mistakes is not acceptable in a decent society.

Sounds about right for the life we live today.

Look at the Democrats blaming Donald Trump for their errors.

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8 hours ago, Oma said:

Had a gentleman come up to me in the market today and ask what had caused the honey he had sent to him from Switzerland to granulate with very course crystals. Needless to say I questioned him further and told him it was illegal for honey to come into nz. He said it had been posted to him and customs had not stopped it and was happy to have got it in without detection. 🥺

Is it not detected as food by the mail screening process or are our border controls only interested in drugs?  

He said he consumed all the honey but it wasn’t very nice, and disposed of the container by burning it, then had to buy some Manuka honey at great expense to send back in return!

Hi oma, ive got my Dad down from Turangi staying for a few weeks and he said he had been buying some nice honey from the market there that he liked. Could it be yours?

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6 hours ago, YTB8TA270 said:

Hi oma, ive got my Dad down from Turangi staying for a few weeks and he said he had been buying some nice honey from the market there that he liked. Could it be yours?

How exciting it could be.  There are often 4 honey sellers in our tiny market but mine is the only one fully labeled with a Turangi address.  The others come from Whanganui, Taumaranui, and one is unlabelled and sold without verification by an 80yr old timer who has always sold it like this and isn’t about to change any time soon.

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4 hours ago, Oma said:

How exciting it could be.  There are often 4 honey sellers in our tiny market but mine is the only one fully labeled with a Turangi address.  The others come from Whanganui, Taumaranui, and one is unlabelled and sold without verification by an 80yr old timer who has always sold it like this and isn’t about to change any time soon.

Do you sell from a yellow vehicle?

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Hi YTB - Have been given a pound of east coast whitebatit.  Each bait is a lot smaller than WC bate.  They make WC look genetically modified.  I won't say no to good quality food gifts, but the last two winters have taken up competitive euchre on a Friday night at a nearby town and there is always a pound of whitebait to chose from the prizes, and I am absolutely proud to say I won it three times last winter.  I hadn't played euchre since I was a nine year old, my dad thought my maths so appalling he insisted on playing euchre and bridge several times a week.  So something, that I learned as a little nipper, comes as easy as riding a bike, and when I get that whitebait I am v grateful to my daddy.  There are some real card sharks in this comp, another reason for being v pleased with myself.  It's a great way to spend a Friday night, not too far from home.  

 

How are you going with these new restrictions, and what is your opinion of them?

 

Where exactly R U based?

 

Whoops - cos of this thread, I am meant to make a comment about cows.  What do cows think of West Coast Whitebait?

Do you shoot cows with your A270?

 

I forgot to say that the euchre comp whitebait prizes are always west coast whitebait.  Yummy yummy

Anyway - YTB I am really keen to meet you.  Cos of the huge whitebait.  In winter I deliver tuts in producing queen cells in large numbers.  The first tut of the winter will be in quite an unusual location in the Canty foothills and I can do a whitebait/tutorial deal.  If you are coming to the Canty tut you will need to bring a rather large pumpkin. haha hint hint.  Some of the ex Airborne Honey beeks have said they will attend, and believe me they really know their s..t - I mean stock.  Forgot to put a k on the end. 

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3 hours ago, Maggie James said:

Hi YTB - Have been given a pound of east coast whitebatit.  Each bait is a lot smaller than WC bate.  They make WC look genetically modified.  I won't say no to good quality food gifts, but the last two winters have taken up competitive euchre on a Friday night at a nearby town and there is always a pound of whitebait to chose from the prizes, and I am absolutely proud to say I won it three times last winter.  I hadn't played euchre since I was a nine year old, my dad thought my maths so appalling he insisted on playing euchre and bridge several times a week.  So something, that I learned as a little nipper, comes as easy as riding a bike, and when I get that whitebait I am v grateful to my daddy.  There are some real card sharks in this comp, another reason for being v pleased with myself.  It's a great way to spend a Friday night, not too far from home.  

 

How are you going with these new restrictions, and what is your opinion of them?

 

Where exactly R U based?

 

Whoops - cos of this thread, I am meant to make a comment about cows.  What do cows think of West Coast Whitebait?

Do you shoot cows with your A270?

 

I forgot to say that the euchre comp whitebait prizes are always west coast whitebait.  Yummy yummy

Anyway - YTB I am really keen to meet you.  Cos of the huge whitebait.  In winter I deliver tuts in producing queen cells in large numbers.  The first tut of the winter will be in quite an unusual location in the Canty foothills and I can do a whitebait/tutorial deal.  If you are coming to the Canty tut you will need to bring a rather large pumpkin. haha hint hint.  Some of the ex Airborne Honey beeks have said they will attend, and believe me they really know their s..t - I mean stock.  Forgot to put a k on the end. 

Can't say Ive seen sth island east coast bait but they sure are a good size on the westcoast,but have caught very nice bait in the BOP and waikato also.  Dont think the new regulations will effect me much. If it helps protect the fishery and we all can put a six month supply in the freezer then all good i say.  Whitebaiting cows? Seen a few in the river, wondered why they were there, now I know.   Have shot a couple with 270 but use a 7mm08 for that. Bullet stays in the head,not so messy. As to where i am, im 30ks inland of Hokitika on a farm beside a lake souroundered by bush. No neighbors.    And as for rearing queens in numbers i try not to, a single brood i have has just produced a couple that ive had to run around catching. Yay.  The pumpkin thing sounds a bit dangerous. 

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11 hours ago, YTB8TA270 said:

The pumpkin thing sounds a bit dangerous. 

Cows luv em

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Who said there was none North of the Harbour Bridge ?

8BB38904-B0BE-4485-BC66-E742AF3B0758.jpeg

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Hmmm..... Canterbury it would seem is the NZ capital for not just AFB, but M Bovis also. 🦉

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I think  MPI thought the same thing for quite a while too @M4tt ! I was told they sent all the blood letting teams north late last year  , and the map promptly lit up like 

a kid with measles . It reinforces my point that Nait is only effective at helping to control/eliminate diseases with timely testing . 

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Thanks @M4tt - I knew there was a lot up north, but news to me that it is still moving south at such a rate - still well north of Auck on the East Coast, but there is more out West Coast than there was. In the days when I was on a dairy farm - 50 years ago, pretty much everyone raised the bulk their own replacement stock - much like beekeeping, factory farming engenders migratory stock raising - the far north has often supplied outsourced heifers raised and sold as near calving to all and sundry, and also bulls are mass raised there to mop up what the AI misses.

Edited by Sailabee
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6 minutes ago, Sailabee said:

Thanks @M4tt - I knew there was a lot up north, but news to me that it is still moving south at such a rate - still well north of Auck on the East Coast, but there is more out West Coast than there was. In the days when I was on a dairy farm - 50 years ago, pretty much everyone raised the bulk their own replacement stock - much like beekeeping, factory farming engenders migratory stock raising - the far north has often supplied outsourced heifers raised and sold as near calving to all and sundry, and also bulls are mass raised there to mop up what the AI misses.

Running as small a country as NZ as one herd makes a lot of sense in efficiency.

Its such a shame that the whole process has been ruined by what ever stupidity let M bovis in the country .

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