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kaihoka

Cow farmers AFB moment

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Posted (edited)

Would that be because bad news and sensationalist news, is what sells?

 

The dearth of news on the eradication program has been apparent for longer than just the last fortnight.

.

My own take. Although it was confidently declared that the eradication program was doomed to fail, and those working on it were vilified, as a beekeeper who has had to work in an environment of endemic AFB, looking at M Bovis it seemed like there were a lot of factors that with good public cooperation, should make it an easy disease to eradicate.

 

Here are factors that make it so much easier to eradicate than AFB

 

Cattle are not free flying like bees.

 

Farmers are supposed to keep records of what their stock movements between properties are, and which individuals went where. IE, any infection should be able to be traced.


To clean a paddock of the disease it just needs to be left unstocked for several weeks

 

Movement of cattle can be controlled.

 

Compensation is paid to infected farmers, but not infected beekeepers.

Edited by Alastair

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Alastair, are you benefitting from this longer than normal (IMO) kanuka flow?

 

 

 

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Not sure Craig. Straight up I got all my supers out just before Christmas and with one small exception have not opened a hive since. Probably give it another couple of weeks then start harvesting and find out what happened. 😎

 

How's it been for you?

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27 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Not sure Craig. Straight up I got all my supers out just before Christmas and with one small exception have not opened a hive since. Probably give it another couple of weeks then start harvesting and find out what happened. 😎

 

How's it been for you?

 

Am away at the moment but was in some hives about a week ago and good amounts of green nectar coming in, its been quite windy and a bit cool since then though.  

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Posted (edited)

Last I heard @Alastair, was MPI were stretching the eradication programme out to 10 years , and employing more people. 
There have been an enormous amount of false positive farms found via a milk test taken late May 2019, which were stored until the results were released Late July/August 2019. I have three mates in this boat , all of whom endured unnecessary stress in the middle of calving . MPI were uncommunicative and very slow to respond and to me , the motivation to quickly halt the spread of disease was anything but. 
To my knowledge , the irradiation of MBovis from  NZ is still as likely as me sprouting wings overnight and flying to town to save petrol 

Edited by M4tt
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1 hour ago, M4tt said:

the irradiation of MBovis from  NZ is still as likely as me sprouting wings overnight and flying to town to save petrol 

If Trump and Iran keep going , irradiation of us all seems quite likely !

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One of the parellel's to beekeeping was that when the original outbreak was confirmed, suddenly MPI  did a grand spring off ring to find that the much vaunted NAIT tagging program was simply being ignored by many farmers, and there was little doubt that while they knew who had bought it in, the originators had covered up for two years, so it had spread far and wide by their actions shifting and selling infected stock, no charges were able to be laid. Much like many are bleating about the new brooms at AFBPMP have started to seriously deal to those with unregistered hives. 

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15 hours ago, Alastair said:

Thanks Matt.

 

To find out, i've done a google, turns out a monthly update is published. The number of "active" farms is now 23. Which must mean an improvement because it used to be in the hundreds.

 

https://www.mpi.govt.nz/protection-and-response/mycoplasma-bovis/situation-report/

 

 

I would say its a lot more than that. I think the number of active farms refers to farms being directly supervised by MPI. Their website is not that clear, but there appears to be another 200 or so that may or do have it but not under the same level of control. https://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/dmsdocument/29192-legal-notices-map

 

I got some calves last year for the school farm. I found a agent in canterbury who directed me to a "Clear" farm that was selling bobby calves (since the numbers at the local bobby calf auctions had all but disappeared. 4 months later, after I had sold 4 of them (luckily to a butcher who raises them for slaughter) we get contacted to say that the farm had bovis present and where were the calves. My neighbour raised 16 from various sources. Sold them to 4 different properties before finding at least 1 lot he brought in were infected and he is now potentially responsible for a mini outbreak. Not his fault as he purchasing from properties already tested clear.

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@Markypoo

 do you think the farmer you brought the calves from was lying .?

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39 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

@Markypoo

 do you think the farmer you brought the calves from was lying .?

I think you will find that the farm was clear at the time the calves were born , and then the herd were tested at the end of calving , with a positive result . I know several cases where farmers have purchased stock from the Waikato , with the assurance from the stock agent that no animals were from the South Island . Few months later , some of the animals have been traced from farms in Canterbury that had subsequently tested positive , resulting in heaps of heartache for the affected farmers . There are a few blowflies clipping the ticket that obviously don’t give a stuff , and no amount of nait tagging will  prevent the spread of Bovis with that behaviour . It merely means you can track where the animals went , but doesn’t prevent the spread in my opinion . 

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5 minutes ago, Jas said:

I think you will find that the farm was clear at the time the calves were born , and then the herd were tested at the end of calving , with a positive result . I know several cases where farmers have purchased stock from the Waikato , with the assurance from the stock agent that no animals were from the South Island . Few months later , some of the animals have been traced from farms in Canterbury that had subsequently tested positive , resulting in heaps of heartache for the affected farmers . There are a few blowflies clipping the ticket that obviously don’t give a stuff , and no amount of nait tagging will  prevent the spread of Bovis with that behaviour . It merely means you can track where the animals went , but doesn’t prevent the spread in my opinion . 

No different to AFB

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1 hour ago, Jas said:

There are a few blowflies clipping the ticket that obviously don’t give a stuff , and no amount of nait tagging will  prevent the spread of Bovis

Thats so sad .

Its so difficult to control that nasty side of human behaviour  without incorruptible  evil spirits who would poison your water and curse your children if you didnt tow the line .

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2 hours ago, kaihoka said:

@Markypoo

 do you think the farmer you brought the calves from was lying .?

Nah. They really believed they were clear. So did the stock agent who was arranging sales of their calves. Not a problem for us as the ones I sold were going into a slaughter herd. The 2 I kept have shown no issues. Bobby calves reared on milk powder and physically separate from other cows are at pretty low risk.

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6 hours ago, Markypoo said:

I would say its a lot more than that

I agree with you . Somehow I don’t think that MPI link is telling the whole story 

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Update on mBovis.

 

MPI are about to include beef farms in their m Bovis  monitoring programme. 
 

As of January 15, 118 beef farms have tested positive. Almost all of these have had contact or movements associated with dairy farms, which is where the disease has been passed on from .


Testing of 2500 beef farms, which have no known contact with m Bovis , will begin this month . This will be done in conjunction with TB testing , and the tests will be run at Assure Quality labs, with an expected 3 week turnaround with results. 
 

 

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That will be interesting. If everybody has been honest with their paperwork and good with their quarantine procedures, no or few of these farms should have the disease.

 

I wonder if any beekeepers will be blamed for possible positives. 😳

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

 

 

I wonder if any beekeepers will be blamed for possible positives. 😳

No . As far as I know there has been no spread from indirect contact . 
It has to be animal to animal 

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So all that vehicle decontamination has been for nothing. 😳

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1 hour ago, M4tt said:

No . As far as I know there has been no spread from indirect contact . 
It has to be animal to animal 

Are you optimistic about the results ?

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

So all that vehicle decontamination has been for nothing. 😳

On farm biosecurity has become second nature now as a result . That’s not going to change . Perhaps that’s why there are no known cases of infection from dirty vehicles . Stock truck operators must have done a very good job to reduce risk 

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Up here, still MBV free, but dairy farms have been advised to put electric perimeter boundary fence to stop over the fence exchanges - wonder how viable that would be for extensive beef runs, which are often far larger, and the country rougher going? 

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By up here, do you mean north of the harbour bridge Sailabee?

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4 hours ago, Alastair said:

By up here, do you mean north of the harbour bridge Sailabee?

Heard a speaker who is one of the local stock carriers in Kumeu etc - know he goes as far as Kaukapakapa, so speaking for a fairly large circle - there are now no dairying farms really near me - Len Brown - lecherous Len managed to get one of the surviving dairy farms at Waitoki's rates for 360 acres up to over $100,000 - literally rated out of the business to beef/lamb - rural Rodney etc hugely subsidises urban cultural events and lifestyle.

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22 hours ago, M4tt said:

No . As far as I know there has been no spread from indirect contact . 
It has to be animal to animal 

Lucky is not in sheep 😉

 

20 hours ago, M4tt said:

On farm biosecurity has become second nature now as a result . That’s not going to change . Perhaps that’s why there are no known cases of infection from dirty vehicles . Stock truck operators must have done a very good job to reduce risk 

Had meetings with several primary groups before xmas and this will be the next thing beekeepers are going to have to get their head around, bio-security on orchards/farms etc is only going to ramp up and beekeepers are going to need to show that they can wok within the properties systems.  Similar to H&S.

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