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kaihoka

Cow farmers AFB moment

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1 hour ago, M4tt said:

Ok.

 

Heres a bit of an update on the MBovis eradication programme as summed up by Keith Woodford, well respected in farming circles for telling it how it is.

 

Its not looking particularly promising and dairy farmers are now voting on yet another levy to basically pay back the government some of the eradication attempt costs, which will come into effect on milk supplied from June 1 2019. 

 

https://www.interest.co.nz/rural-news/98185/keith-woodford-describes-how-anger-mounting-again-amongst-mycoplasma-bovis-farmers

Well that was gloomy reading.

Last reports I had heard were that were well into remission, however must have read some false reports ie journalists talking directly to mpi.

Sounds like the Govt only wants too hear good news,

and not report the reality

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One of the many reasons I don’t want a bar of a GIA with MPI.

 

what a freaking nightmare for all those poor farmers who have been put through the mill by pen pushing government officials that are working to their own agenda rather than for the best outcome of farmers.

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I heard of one guy who lost his farm by a combination of circumstances, of which an M. bovis investigation was a part.

 

However over time there have been many beekeepers suffered severe financial loss or even lost their entire business due to AFB. And what help is available to them? None, nada, zip.

 

The cow farmers are in a better position.

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

The cow farmers are in a better position.

Yes and no .

 

The cost could well wipe out our economy .

Most of the cattle being killed do not have the disease . They are being killed by association , as it’s still very hard to get a reliable positive or negative result from the test . 

 

There is no doubt in my mind that this disease cannot be irradicated , and if it can , the cost is too high .

 

I should keep my opinion to myself , but a blind person could see the program isn’t working and the situation is going from bad to very much worse 

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Is the slow progress due to lack of staff? IE, they are taking too long to get to places?

Edited by Alastair

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1 hour ago, M4tt said:

Yes and no .

 

The cost could well wipe out our economy .

Most of the cattle being killed do not have the disease . They are being killed by association , as it’s still very hard to get a reliable positive or negative result from the test . 

 

There is no doubt in my mind that this disease cannot be irradicated , and if it can , the cost is too high .

 

I should keep my opinion to myself , but a blind person could see the program isn’t working and the situation is going from bad to very much worse 

If it is eventually accepted that it can not be eliminated only controlled wont that affect the whole culture around cow farming .

Gypsy day , sharemilking and moving cows around the country.

Wont farmers be more reluctant to move stock around .

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53 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Is the slow progress due to lack of staff? IE, they are taking too long to get to places?

No I don’t think so. The decision makers got it wrong trying to eliminate it . 

 

mBovis is a cunning little disease that can easily hide and there are hundreds of thousands of cattle movements all over NZ for any number of justifiable reasons . 

5 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

If it is eventually accepted that it can not be eliminated only controlled wont that affect the whole culture around cow farming .

Gypsy day , sharemilking and moving cows around the country.

Wont farmers be more reluctant to move stock around .

Going by what the rest of the world does , it’s simply a case of culling animals with clinical symptoms . Most never go clinical . 

There are a host of other diseases we manage this way .

 

 

Edited by M4tt
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My neighbour has ben cleansed of Bovis. We did'nt put bee's there this spring on account of truck tyre carting stuff here and there.. He raises bought in bull beef and had a herd of Angus cows from his father. All were slaughtered because he bought  a line of 20 somthing beefies from a dodgy herd.

None of the stock showed positive from slaughter.

His comment was that Jacindas budget for mental health was great, albeit a little bit late.  I suggested that Jacinda pay our bar tab for the next few months.

 

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Talking about bar tab James, you never sent me details how to pay for that awesome Beech Dew you sent me.

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No charge .... enjoy  ... the world is round !

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i feel guilty 😳

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4 minutes ago, Alastair said:

i feel guilty 😳

Aah crap .... next time I'm passing through   Auckland with a flatty at 3.00am  you'll be really happy ...  the world is round ... eh!

But ... if you still feel guilty..... we are supporting a cause in Nepal to rebuild after the earthquake so ....  maybe I'll  send you bank details..... win win eh.

www.gwt.org.uk/dignity

 

These guys support families who have members in The Gorkha regiment of the British Army. I worked in Nepal for a few years, My nephew worked with these  guys while he was protecting the free world .....  They are a proud and resilient people who nature has delt a dud card .... I'll say no more.  

Edited by jamesc
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I will give them some money. 

 

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The mBovis was worse than it should have been, partly because of those not keeping their Nait tag information up to date - exactly the same as happens with AFB and unregistered hives and AFB.

Having been dairying when both Brucellosis and TB were more prevalent,  people are now into factory farming and are shifting huge numbers of stock constantly around the country. Instead of raising their own replacement stock, week old calves are sold to someone to raise to weaning, then on to next owner to raise to heifer near calving, etc. We used to be very circumspect about buying in from a source of unknown or untrusted disease status. I see migrating bees and disease in much the same way.

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11 hours ago, Alastair said:

i feel guilty 😳

Oh @Alistair cut it out, you've done a good turn for many people, enjoy this one.

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Thanks for the kind words Fieldbee 🙂. Anyhow this time the good turn was done by James, so i've made the donation to his cause, looks like I bought a Gurkha elderly person a wheelchair!

 

Always admired the people of Nepal and Tibet as tough resilient people, so, money well spent. 🙂

Edited by Alastair
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2 hours ago, Alastair said:

Thanks for the kind words Fieldbee 🙂. Anyhow this time the good turn was done by James, so i've made the donation to his cause, looks like I bought a Gurkha elderly person a wheelchair!

 

Always admired the people of Nepal and Tibet as tough resilient people, so, money well spent. 🙂

I have often wondered why people ever lived in such a hostile environment,  other than the scenery.

I figure they must have been driven there for safety and security by more aggressive  humans .

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Agreed, seems likely. They have been there a long time, the Tibetan people who also migrated to parts of Nepal, have a higher red blood cell count than most people to give them endurance in the thin air, they are also more resistant to cold.

.

As a child, my parents were friends with an English guy who was in Tibet when the Chinese invaded the country. China and the West were bitter enemies at that time so as a westener he was imprisoned for 5 years in a Chinese re education camp but eventually released. He would visit us and stay a few days and filled my young head with stories from that part of the world so it has always been an interest.

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10 hours ago, Alastair said:

Chinese re education camp 

Did it sound similar to the current ones in western china for the uighars.

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Doesn't look like the basic techniques have changed much, the Tibetan people have been severely repressed. He was at first imprisoned with Tibetans but was eventually moved to China and imprisoned with Chinese, and over time he learned the language. He said that other than starvation he was not severely tortured ever, but would be slapped around but not enough to do serious damage. He and all the prisoners were told they could not be sentenced until they confessed their errors, so they had to attend self critisism meetings, where they confessed their wrong doings and discussed how they would change their ways. Once they had convinced their guards they were suitably repentant, they would then face an in prison court where they would be sentenced, and only then would they know how long their sentence would be. So if they never confessed, they never even got sentenced and would never be released. In his groups were people who he believed had been arrested after being reported on by someone wanting to even a score or similar, and had never done anything wrong. All the same, they confessed to all kinds of wrong doing such as thinking the great leader was wrong. He believed they were faking it but could never really tell.

When he was eventually released he must have had what we would now call post traumatic stress syndrome, he could not look at someone in the eye without blushing deeply and other problems, it took a long time for him to "recover". He was also not allowed to travel to the USA, they banned him because he had been under communist instruction for 5 years, and they did not feel he could be trusted. That's how they thought back then.

Edited by Alastair
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@Alastair sounds like being trapped in a kafka novel.

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On ‎2‎/‎06‎/‎2019 at 9:07 AM, kaihoka said:

Did it sound similar to the current ones in western china for the uighars.

 

And people practising Falong Gong

 

 

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Hows the eradication program going now?

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

Hows the eradication program going now?

That’s a really good question . With the media on skeleton staff and the government on holiday , there is no new info. 

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