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H3 treated floor boards

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On ‎4‎/‎05‎/‎2018 at 7:16 AM, Lindaloo26 said:

And, the sun here tortures everything. 

if you want to avoid the problems with timber moving in the sun, stainless fixings not holding, galv fixings failing in treated timber, thermowood being brittle, treated timber possably contaminating honey or harming bees you could always make your bases out of concrete. I have seen it done and have been lucky enough to help move hives with them in and out of kiwifruit orchards many years ago. :14_relaxed:

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FYI - there are two main types of H3 treated timber .

Timber treatment classes H3.1 and H 3.2

 

3.1 is LOSP treated IE it's an liquid organic solvent treatment process - which dispates in strength over time so is not so good in the wet and will  rot sooner 

the other is H3.2 class which is a CCA treated product ( Copper Chromium and Arsnic) - It a way more durabel product for outdoors but is more toxic - IE resists decay better than H3.1

 

Not sure that answers your question - but it might help.

The best thing is to elevate and allow base boards to dry quickly and easily as that provides the best option for durability and perhaps have the feet treated but not the top surface.

 

 

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On ‎2‎/‎05‎/‎2018 at 9:05 PM, Lindaloo26 said:

So true. I wonder how much impact all those grape and kiwifruit poles have in the long term  

I understood that dispite the controversy - studies show no ground contamination - at least the report I read..

Edited by Haydon

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On ‎3‎/‎05‎/‎2018 at 3:14 PM, yesbut said:

Decomposed by reaction with the timber treatment and water. It's why stainless fixings are required more frequently these days.

Yes correct - but only with H3.2 treated timber not H3.1 - and yes its a reaction when in contact with water - Its a disimilar metal issue.

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26 minutes ago, Haydon said:

Yes correct - but only with H3.2 treated timber not H3.1 - and yes its a reaction when in contact with water - Its a disimilar metal issue.

 

What's the difference between 3.2 and 3.1? Interesting 

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11 minutes ago, Lindaloo26 said:

 

What's the difference between 3.2 and 3.1? Interesting 

H3.2 is used exposed to weather, out of ground contact. Same with H3.1 but it needs to be painted. eg weatherboards, exterior trim.

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Done a prototype today.   Just cut out the entrance as a swivel.  May need to consider removing, trimming and painting this swivel piece to ensure it continues to move in and out easily. It may swell with weather.   New stainless screens will cost about $4  cut and delivered.  I could try to recover my old ones, which involves a fire and snagging out the screens as they fall of floors.  Dirty job and the screens do get a bit buckled.  The original floor has a hole bigger than this.  And the riser was lower.  This one about 17mm.  These floors sit on a pallet if anyone was wondering about the low profile. 

Suggestions, ideas? 

 

Floor 1.jpg

Floor.jpg

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6 minutes ago, Lindaloo26 said:

Suggestions, ideas? 

 

Yes, get rid of the front bit altogether. Even at max open, the entrance is way too small.

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1 minute ago, Alastair said:

 

Yes, get rid of the front bit altogether. Even at max open, the entrance is way too small.

 

No.  I will make it bigger.  The whole idea of my entrance is it to allow me to easily open and close the bees in when I move them around.   I have had smaller entrances on hives and it doesn't bother them too much. The mesh floor sitting on top of a pallet gives them lots of ventilation.  Granted I do think the entrance is too small.  

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The bees will propolise the swivels open especially the piece inside the hive, they do the same with HD floors being plastic it's easier break the propolis. Wood can  brake trying to get it unstuck.

However if shifting hives regularly there shouldn't be a problem. 

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Yes, painting the entrance area with a hard enamel might work okay.  Or apply some other type of anti propolising agent.  Oil? Silicone, 

Or just clean that area at end of winter.  The bit of wood is pretty strong.  Shifting will happen mainly for kiwis.  

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Shift at night and get rid of the screens.

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Ta. Done that.  I often shift my bees unblocked.  It's the short shifts between orchards, sites, orchards, sites which don't keep the bees in.  They crawl and sting.  I enjoy shifting them around, just not the bees flying into my eyes while I am pushing buttons to place a pallet, hanging high up in the air and in the dark.  To shift and not have to carry a smoker and wear gloves and veil is sweet.  Leaving them open and driving for more than 30 minutes and then drop them in one place is easy.  The short drive with stop start, a pallet here, pallet here makes em mad as.  I also like my early morning drive out to the summer sites, with bees nicely blocked in and no hurry in the world.  Go past mr/s public and farmer brown and even have time to chat.  Without leaving a small swarm behind.  

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I solved my shifting problems by no longer doing any. I sometimes feel guilty that I no longer do pollination but after 45 years of it I figure I've done my share. 

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1 hour ago, Lindaloo26 said:

Done a prototype today.   Just cut out the entrance as a swivel.  May need to consider removing, trimming and painting this swivel piece to ensure it continues to move in and out easily. It may swell with weather.   New stainless screens will cost about $4  cut and delivered.  I could try to recover my old ones, which involves a fire and snagging out the screens as they fall of floors.  Dirty job and the screens do get a bit buckled.  The original floor has a hole bigger than this.  And the riser was lower.  This one about 17mm.  These floors sit on a pallet if anyone was wondering about the low profile. 

Suggestions, ideas? 

 

Floor 1.jpg

Floor.jpg

My biggest concern would be the entrance getting accidently closed by stock rubbing or scratching on the hives. Regarding entrance size, 75 x 9 mm on mesh seams to work fine for me.

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10 minutes ago, Jamo said:

My biggest concern would be the entrance getting accidently closed by stock rubbing or scratching on the hives

Yes, I did think about that.  Because the box sits inside the perimeter of floor, the worst that can happen is the entrance could be reduced, not closed.  

The chance of accidental feet hitting it is low.  Stock just don't get feet in close to fences, gates because they so fat.   I could make the 'hinge' off center so that when open less of the wood is sticking out front.  

The other thought, the entrance is easier to close versus opening.  You have to push the wood 'into' the hive to open it. 

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I have seen some entrance closers which use an separate item - a length of angle steel wood bracing- the ones with lots of holes so that you can nail through it. 

These drop into, or slide over entrances.  But it's a separate item to carry, forget, count and loose.

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9 minutes ago, Lindaloo26 said:

Yes, I did think about that.  Because the box sits inside the perimeter of floor, the worst that can happen is the entrance could be reduced, not closed.  

The chance of accidental feet hitting it is low.  Stock just don't get feet in close to fences, gates because they so fat.   I could make the 'hinge' off center so that when open less of the wood is sticking out front.  

The other thought, the entrance is easier to close versus opening.  You have to push the wood 'into' the hive to open it. 

I noticed your landing board after posting when I had a proper look.

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What about something that attaches allowing been out, then can be turned over to close up but allow ventilation. 

The below is sort of what I mean, but if it was done in such as way as to have more than 2 options it would be better (ie more than just open or closed, which could be done by making it reversible, which something on the hive that it either aligned or partly aligned with).

http://www.giordaninox.it/en/products/1/10/25

 

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11 minutes ago, cBank said:

I use these on my hives to exclude mice but they are a pain to attach as the metal strip slides into to small strips attached to each side of the front of the hive. When you exchange the bottom box for any reason the metal strips need to be moved or others attached to the new bottom box. The metal excluders are too long for standard width of a hive and I had to cut each one down to fit.  If the base and hive are not well aligned the metal strip ceases to work effectively.      

I like the idea of attaching the “gate” to the base itself like your photos. 

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On 28/05/2018 at 5:20 PM, Lindaloo26 said:

 

No.  I will make it bigger.  The whole idea of my entrance is it to allow me to easily open and close the bees in when I move them around.   I have had smaller entrances on hives and it doesn't bother them too much. The mesh floor sitting on top of a pallet gives them lots of ventilation.  Granted I do think the entrance is too small.  

Linda Loo if you made the entrance block of wood a little longer, for example 75ml as Jamo says, and put the screw nearer one end rather than the middle, so when open only a piece slightly shorter than the landing board is protruding outwards, that will give it more protection from cattle etc, and if after you cut them try trimming their height down by a ml or 2 so that if/when they swell they wont grab.

I have 13ml side runners and use 13x13ml metal strips which I cut out of house bracing angle that any building supply company sells, they come in 6mtr lengths, which I cut down to size, you'll need an angle grinder to cut them. I have a landing board like yours and have a cut on each side that the angle metal strips slips into. 1 side of the angle is solid and i cut out an entrance 9x20ml, you will need a nibbler or grinder to do this,and the other side is fill of holes that bees cant fit through. When we move hives we slide the hole side in so we can travel daytime quick shifts in to pollination etc, when sitting for winter the small entrance side is slid in, and when on the honey we put the entrance angle iron into top feeder.

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19 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

have 13ml side runners and use 13x13ml metal strips which I cut out of house bracing angle

 

Thanks Dennis. 

I have some of that angle iron bracing.  It is bigger - 17mm.  And I have played around with that idea.  I like that you can turn this around and make a small winter entrance.  

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