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Gino de Graaf

H3 treated floor boards

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Hi, 

 

Using H3 90x19mm in a screened floor

 I know treated timber is no good for bees, though is it okay if they have limited contact? 

The 90x19 will be the outer surround, and the screen covers the middle.  Like a border. 

Bees will have contact around the border and especially entrance area.  These I could paint with a hard oil based paint if required. 

Thoughts?

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My thoughts are that if there's no chewing going on there's no issue.

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Thanks, 

I wouldn't use treated boxes, they do affect bees. 

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Lindaloo, I have had same type of floors for years, no problem yet. Mine are mesh floors with 50mm wide border, box covers up 25mm ish. I just keep them painted/stained.

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1 minute ago, Dennis Crowley said:

Lindaloo, I have had same type of floors for years, no problem yet. Mine are mesh floors with 50mm wide border, box covers up 25mm ish. I just keep them painted/stained.

 

Good trip? 

Thanks, my border will be larger- with a smaller mesh space.  Thought an oil based lacquer will be good. 

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Paraffin dipping seals it up nicely as does a good paint. Unsealed treated timber can knock your bees around probably because of moisture collected from the surface.

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Why not use tan E treatment which is bee friendly and H3 rated and no need to paint.

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8 minutes ago, Jamo said:

Why not use tan E treatment which is bee friendly and H3 rated and no need to paint.

Yeah, cause I am lazy.  Means I have to source untreated, then measure/cut and deliver to the plant.  Price is sharp on what I am looking at.  

 

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TanE still has copper and chrome neither of which you want in your residue testing. I seriously doubt that any residues would cause any harm but in this day and age of testing down to parts per million I prefer to ere on the side of caution.

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13 minutes ago, john berry said:

TanE still has copper and chrome neither of which you want in your residue testing. I seriously doubt that any residues would cause any harm but in this day and age of testing down to parts per million I prefer to ere on the side of caution.

Tan E is copper based but it contains no chrome. We have used tan E treated timber extensively since it became available locally in 2000.  Results from residue testing that we have done have all come back below limits. Considering how much copper is sprayed onto hort crops it is one of the safer heavy metals. Certinally much safer than chrome and arsenic which are both in cca H3 treatment.

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1 hour ago, Jamo said:

arsenic which are both in cca H3 treatment.

And leaching into the ground by the tonne all over the country

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17 minutes ago, yesbut said:

And leaching into the ground by the tonne all over the country

So true. I wonder how much impact all those grape and kiwifruit poles have in the long term 

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1 hour ago, Lindaloo26 said:

So true. I wonder how much impact all those grape and kiwifruit poles have in the long term 

Given the lifespan of the posts and wire in orchards I wouldnt be worried about it. And not as much copper is sprayed as you might think.... Also some interesting facts around its long term effects on the soil....

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Tan e is what I use, available from these guys

 

http://tunnicliffes.co.nz/bee-woodware-.html

 

If you definately don't want any chemicals you can get thermowood from them. No chemicals, treated by heat, and lasts as long as H3. Used to be my preferred choice, only, it can be brittle.

Edited by Alastair
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Thanks Alastair, 

I buy their boxes.  Not worried about chems just looking at a possible 500 meter order of dressed H3 - From the responses, it appears that there aren't too many strong negative thoughts about using this as a floor- Most likely I will seal with a oil based paint when dry.  Yes, the thermo wood is good and brittle.  Nice though. Baked wood. 

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13 hours ago, yesbut said:

And leaching into the ground by the tonne all over the country

If there was a bit more used up in Auckland there wouldn't be so many leaky homes. 

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You can buy just straight tan e timber from tunnicliffes to make into whatever you want. However if you got a better deal happening, your call.

 

Me, I'm not really comfy with using normal treated timber in a hive and I know it penetrates paint you'll see the colour change. But on the other hand I don't know any actual evidence of it contaminating honey, so over to the user, i guess. ☺️

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Bee health more of a concern.  Some guy had treated boxes, yes boxes- bees suffered.  Probably okay when dry (summer) just the wet/condensation issue in cooler times.  

You know all that retaining post work - it's everywhere now, every nook and cranny got a house on it- well how long are those guaranteed for??  

I heard something like 30-50 years-  they'll eventually go soft and need replacing.  Very difficult to do later.   

Look at all those post and rail fences- I got one (well a ranch style one) , 12-15 years old- I built it.  It will need redoing.  Actually I removed a part of that fence, I removed one with the concrete around the bottom- damn that was hard.  So decide to cut the other off at ground level-  didn't need to- it clean snapped off at the concrete.  I was re-aligning the fence and also  cut right through the main water line. 

Many of the fences built now I think are a bit sub par.  

 

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A bigger issue than the timber rotting is the zinc disappearing off galv. nails and the nails rusting away. There'll be a humungous amount of work dealing with this over the next decade. 

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1 hour ago, yesbut said:

A bigger issue than the timber rotting is the zinc disappearing off galv. nails and the nails rusting away. There'll be a humungous amount of work dealing with this over the next decade. 

?? where's it going - 

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59 minutes ago, Lindaloo26 said:

?? where's it going - 

Decomposed by reaction with the timber treatment and water. It's why stainless fixings are required more frequently these days.

Edited by yesbut

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And the stainless fixings have way less grip on the timber, and even annular grooved decking nails work their way out of the timber.

 

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20 hours ago, Lindaloo26 said:

Look at all those post and rail fences...

...Many of the fences built now I think are a bit sub par.  

 

 

The standard fence post, even when 100 or 125 square is just so nasty. The pine they are made from appears to have been growing about 10 minutes before you buy them. They are so wet that little splashes of water come out when you bang nails in, and I’ve convinced myself that the watery wood blunts saw blades quickly.

 

As they dry the amount of twist is amazing - 2.4 posts can get a quarter turn in them quite easily, and I’m picking ones without knots etc.

Edited by cBank
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