Jump to content

Wholesale prices Manuka Honey


DanS
 Share

Recommended Posts

My GUESS, is that with it being more difficult to blend non manuka and inflate the quantity sold, there will be less manuka labelled jars for sale, so if you have the real thing, it should be in good demand.

 

That is my GUESS. I don't know what really goes on behind boardroom doors.

 

Aussie product will be hitting the world market in increasing quantities, let's hope the world market is able to differentiate between the original from the green hills of NZ, and the copycat.

Edited by Alastair
Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a LOT of bush floating around which used to be Manuka, but has now failed the MPI 5 test. I wonder if somehow the Ozzie beeks can be forced to try to pass the MPI 5 before they can use the 'Manuka' name. I know some send their Ozzie Leptospernum honey across to NZ for mgo testing. 

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I hear - and reading between the lines of a large buyers price list anything that is not mono manuka and not going to grow into umf 10 plus is going to be worth about half what it was last year.  Example: a guy I know sold umf 5 honey to a buyer last year for $23 kg.  This year they are paying less than $10 kg for the same honey.  

  • Good Info 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Ted said:

From what I hear - and reading between the lines of a large buyers price list anything that is not mono manuka and not going to grow into umf 10 plus is going to be worth about half what it was last year.  Example: a guy I know sold umf 5 honey to a buyer last year for $23 kg.  This year they are paying less than $10 kg for the same honey.  

I have sold my own multi umf6 for almost 3 times that figure this year. Growth projection under 10 umf

I would say the tests speak for themselves.. buyer knows what he needs to blend and what he's blending with. 

If it suits his needs he will pay the coin. 

$10 seems rediculous but need to see what it tested as. In my opinion. 

  • Good Info 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, Stoney said:

I have sold my own multi umf6 for almost 3 times that figure this year. Growth projection under 10 umf

I would say the tests speak for themselves.. buyer knows what he needs to blend and what he's blending with. 

If it suits his needs he will pay the coin. 

$10 seems rediculous but need to see what it tested as. In my opinion. 

And to think, a few years ago we were ecstatic with $4.80/kg ..... and made a living !!

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, jamesc said:

And to think, a few years ago we were ecstatic with $4.80/kg ..... and made a living !!

The good ol days before govt induced red tape, flash as V8 bee trucks and you could fire a useless employee on the spot and tell them to walk home.. sweet memories I'd say 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, Stoney said:

I have sold my own multi umf6 for almost 3 times that figure this year. Growth projection under 10 umf

I would say the tests speak for themselves.. buyer knows what he needs to blend and what he's blending with. 

If it suits his needs he will pay the coin. 

$10 seems rediculous but need to see what it tested as. In my opinion. 

Don’t know the test details but would assume it was Multifloral manuka.  Point is it was from the same site and had the same umf level as the previous season and many seasons prior to that and he was a loyal supplier.  This particular buyer is rather large and tends to be a price setter for all the other buyers around the country which is a bit scary if they all decide to follow their lead.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Ted said:

Don’t know the test details but would assume it was Multifloral manuka.  Point is it was from the same site and had the same umf level as the previous season and many seasons prior to that and he was a loyal supplier.  This particular buyer is rather large and tends to be a price setter for all the other buyers around the country which is a bit scary if they all decide to follow their lead.  

For some reason there seems to be differences in nth and mainland prices other than very different Manuka honeys. 

Down here my personal and work sites test different every year. 

Umf from last season was 2.4. This season 6 on one of my local sites. 

As for this large buyer... I'd fish around and get a few prices. 

Things have definitely changed with testing no doubt about it.. my honey always made $20 Pre testing, last yrs uncertainty it made $12-14.. this yr I'm happy even with it just missing out on mono class. 

Cant work out why it's so different for you fellas north of the best island.. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, Stoney said:

For some reason there seems to be differences in nth and mainland prices other than very different Manuka honeys. 

Down here my personal and work sites test different every year. 

Umf from last season was 2.4. This season 6 on one of my local sites. 

As for this large buyer... I'd fish around and get a few prices. 

Things have definitely changed with testing no doubt about it.. my honey always made $20 Pre testing, last yrs uncertainty it made $12-14.. this yr I'm happy even with it just missing out on mono class. 

Cant work out why it's so different for you fellas north of the best island.. 

Your talking about Kapiti Island I presume???

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Ted said:

This particular buyer is rather large and tends to be a price setter for all the other buyers around the country which is a bit scary if they all decide to follow their lead.

That sort of arrangement cannot go on for ever.
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

to me this is just part of being a primary producer.  a lot of the honey buyers will no that there are people that need to sell so they see a better profit margin for them so they will bring the price down. it happen with farming all the time as soon as it gets dry or hints that it might get dry the works will bring the schedule back 20 cents.   

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

i've also sold this year slightly better than last.

compensates for all the additional testing.

of cos the buyers know there is many desperate beekeepers out there and will use this as leverage. it's business after all.

but i also think a lot of money will have left the industry and was invested elsewhere.

the poofight about standards and the record  harvest - low last year would have done some damage in growing a solid "industry"but may have saved the bee from a far bigger disaster.

one thing is sure, the prices on the shelves are not going down.

  • Agree 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone like to hazard a guess as to how much failed 5+ there is out there in beekeepers sheds just looking for a new home? 200 ton?, 300 ton? more?

Have heard that there is a potential buyer out there who is prepared to pay market rates (whatever that means! $$$$) for 200t of 5+.

Link to post
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, nab said:

to me this is just part of being a primary producer.  a lot of the honey buyers will no that there are people that need to sell so they see a better profit margin for them so they will bring the price down. it happen with farming all the time as soon as it gets dry or hints that it might get dry the works will bring the schedule back 20 cents.   

Just imagine being a primary producer farming beef, when suddenly a new test shows half your meat is now pork and the rest is chicken. 

  • Agree 3
  • Haha 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 23/04/2018 at 5:34 PM, Alastair said:

But is this $10 UMF 5 pure monofloral manuka?

 

If yes and things are really that bad I can see a lot of bee business firesales coming up!

From what I have seen it is MGO 85+ honey which has failed MPI 5 altogether which is selling for $8 - $10/kg.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 24/04/2018 at 10:57 PM, Janice said:

Just imagine being a primary producer farming beef, when suddenly a new test shows half your meat is now pork and the rest is chicken. 

Ha Ha Ha, yes Janice, you couldn't have said it better! I'm sitting back with a dirty great grin on my face watching all these 'Northern' beekeepers squirming in their seats over whether to call Manuka honey manuka or be forced into calling it Bush blend. Whether it is 5+ or 30+ doesn't really matter to us southern producers, we all sit here with glee watching you agonize over the MPI tests.

Contrary to many North Island beliefs we South Islanders DO get manuka honey, and what's more, in certain areas we DO get active manuka honey. Many northern producers rubbish the idea, but UMF 30+ has been produced in a very large quantity below 45 degrees south. What quantity you may ask..... in excess of 30 tonne, from one producer! Now that producer may have serious reservations about the new manuka standards but he has made his money from seasons past, but I know he is sitting back and waiting for the dust to settle before he releases more honey into the volatile market.

Link to post
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Harlan Cox said:

@Old Timer

 how about some GPS coordinates for this SI 30+ honey, below 45° south is just too vague!

Yes, I know where the areas are but I'm not giving that one away to anyone. I'm leaving that knowledge in the hands of those who run their hives in those particular areas. If you had a patch where you put your hives every year, you wouldn't want anyone advertising where that area is, would you? This is a public site. You may be from Northland but there are many down here who wouldn't think twice about moving in 500 hives even if they have to travel 500 km beyond their normal boundaries. Don't worry Bee Good, I've been in this business long enough to know how much to give away.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...