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April 2018 Beekeeping Diary


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Well, that's it. The honey is in the drum and the machinery had a pre clean. It was a good year. The rest of the week is tidy up mode, sweeping the floor and  polishing stainless gear prior to winteri

Today I made a start removing Apivar strips and giving hives the general once over.   Of the 25 hives around my house that I did, most are either bloodless or have a tiny patch of brood, and

Huge trees down all over the place round here. This beast down in One Tree Hill.   On closer look, halfway up is a feral hive, with lots of orientation flights happening. Very docile despite

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6 hours ago, Ali said:

The same to you Trev! Hope the season gave you a crop of honey to work through:).

Thanks @Ali. Yes, I had a quite good season although some hives did not produce a crop, every hive is crammed with bees and a full box of honey on board.  I will be going on my annual holiday this month feeling a lot better than the same time last year.

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Last lot of cells for the season out today but I got that sinking feeling you get when taking cells out of the finisher hive and you had an early Hatcher ?. Looks like it happened earlier today and fortunately none of the other cells on the bar were damaged. So I took the top box off the of the Cloake Board with all its bees and capped brood and put it on a new floor with inner cover and lid moving it to a new spot for the (hopefully) new queen to go in mating flights and head a new colony. The second pic shows how well fed the growing queen was with lots of royal jelly remaining in the cup. Out tomorrow morning to collect nucs with the queens from the mother hives and take them to a site closer to home.

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no sure there- it could be a dud cell removed by workers.  Often a newly hatched cell has the 'cap' still swinging of the tip after a day.  If not, at least a clean hatch out opening. 

The left over jelly doesn't look consistent with 10 day cells, which often have harder/yellower ,left over deposits.  Also, a newly hatched virgin doesn't muck around, they destroy competition as soon as possible.  Be interesting to see how you get on with the matings.  We stopped on the 20th.  You like the JZBZ cups?

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37 minutes ago, Lindaloo26 said:

no sure there- it could be a dud cell removed by workers.  Often a newly hatched cell has the 'cap' still swinging of the tip after a day.  If not, at least a clean hatch out opening. 

The left over jelly doesn't look consistent with 10 day cells, which often have harder/yellower ,left over deposits.  Also, a newly hatched virgin doesn't muck around, they destroy competition as soon as possible.  Be interesting to see how you get on with the matings.  We stopped on the 20th.  You like the JZBZ cups?

Yeah the flap was still there. I decided to take the pic after stuffing around with it. I like these cell cups. I buy them via AliExpress they are a copy and cheaper than going through any NZ supplier ?. Easy to use same as the JZBZ cups they just lock in to the saw kerf on a wooden frame top bar. This is a last effort to bump up hive numbers for spring. Hopefully we have a an Indian Summer. Bees seem to think so as there is still Drone brood and mature Drones around in good numbers.

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friday - post long run i sorted out honey from the hives i look after for a community project. Looks like about 100kg, they'll take it :)

saturday 2:30am - started loading some hives into the back of my 2001 ford laser (same as a mazda familia). Hit the road 3:15am-ish. Got tired around Waverley so pulled over to doze for a bit. Wondered about not having fully closed the hives up and the coming sunrise - a few bees started moving. Got where i was going, unloaded the hives. All good.

Sunday - went through hives of a mate in Taranaki - all well, helped him reduce them down, then went and checked in on a late split he'd made for another mate - also well.

Monday - checked in on the moved hives then drove back to wellington. Traffic stopped me getting back in time to inspect the apiary i'd planned to go through this arvo. Never mind.

 

managed to spend a bunch of time with family while i was up there too, so all up a relaxing weekend. No fishing though.

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I just got the below, I wonder why they publicise it ahead of time: 

 

Aerial Surveillance


This email is to inform you that aerial surveillance to detect the presence of unregistered apiaries will be undertaken in Northland in the next 48 hours as part of an ongoing commitment by the Management Agency to ensure that apiaries are registered.

Registration of apiaries is a very important aspect of the AFB control program as it provides the Management Agency with a thorough understanding of where AFB could be and enables us to effectively prioritise and plan inspection activities.

Registration of apiaries also provides beekeepers with phone text alerts of AFB cases in neighbouring apiaries so that you can prioritise your affected apiaries for additional inspections.

Registration of apiaries is a mandatory requirement for exporting honey to the high value “official assurance” countries.

Thank-you for your cooperation,
 

#### ####
National Compliance Manager

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23 minutes ago, cBank said:

I just got the below, I wonder why they publicise it ahead of time: 

 

Aerial Surveillance


This email is to inform you that aerial surveillance to detect the presence of unregistered apiaries will be undertaken in Northland in the next 48 hours as part of an ongoing commitment by the Management Agency to ensure that apiaries are registered.

Registration of apiaries is a very important aspect of the AFB control program as it provides the Management Agency with a thorough understanding of where AFB could be and enables us to effectively prioritise and plan inspection activities.

Registration of apiaries also provides beekeepers with phone text alerts of AFB cases in neighbouring apiaries so that you can prioritise your affected apiaries for additional inspections.

Registration of apiaries is a mandatory requirement for exporting honey to the high value “official assurance” countries.

Thank-you for your cooperation,
 

#### ####
National Compliance Manager

Easier to spot and confirm when there are activities around hives due to early warning?

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3 hours ago, cBank said:

I just got the below, I wonder why they publicise it ahead of time: 

 

if the desired outcome is for all apiaries to be registered, then highlighting a pending risk of being caught may well result in people acting to register apiaries at risk through not being yet registered = that would be a win right? edit: also received the email, have apiaries in a few regions, none in northland

Edited by tommy dave
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They take photos with GP locations.

They then cross reference that to Apiweb to see if they are registered sites.

If not they then send in foot teams to check the hives identity.

Then they contact owners of hives to register the sites or have the hives destroyed.

It was very successful when they did the same exercise in Taranaki for the last couple of years.

 

There is a move to try and get Reg No stenciled on the roof in 100 mm high lettering to make identity easier from the air. 

They can cover huge areas in a day.  It is not possible to cover that area with drones or on foot.

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On 4/5/2018 at 11:35 AM, Trevor Gillbanks said:

They take photos with GP locations.

They then cross reference that to Apiweb to see if they are registered sites.

If not they then send in foot teams to check the hives identity.

Then they contact owners of hives to register the sites or have the hives destroyed.

It was very successful when they did the same exercise in Taranaki for the last couple of years.

 

There is a move to try and get Reg No stenciled on the roof in 100 mm high lettering to make identity easier from the air. 

They can cover huge areas in a day.  It is not possible to cover that area with drones or on foot.

Consider the reality that the survey needs to be done twice since their is a 30 day allowance.

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