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Alastair

Surprise Got My Site Back

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Pulled in at my favorite cafe today to pick up some 20 litre containers, and immediately got approached by a young lady who says Hi Alastair which way you going I got a vehicle problem can you give me a ride. So I grab the containers, she jumps in the truck, and we go. I knew I'd seen her before but couldn't place her and without being rude I'm trying to figure out who she is how she knows me.

 

But that wasn't the main surprise. B|

 

Then I recognise her, maybe something around a year ago I had arranged with her to put bees on a kanuka site her Dad owns. Then before I moved the bees, I get a phone call, another beekeeper offered them $2,000 to put bees on the site, I told them I couldn't match it, so he got the site. I actually posted on here about it at the time.

 

So she's sitting in the truck and tells me the story. The other beekeeper put his bees on the site, left them through the season, then removed them and vanished. No money was handed over. I had to laugh. :12_slight_smile:

 

So she said the site is yours Alastair, a few jars of honey will do. We also drove past another place she is leasing, she said have a look you could put bees here too so we drove in & checked it out, nice spot, I'll be putting bees there on Sunday!

 

Maybe the moral of the story is be kind to strangers who need a ride. :D

 

 

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Stoked for you! See some times nice guys for the win. Doing happy dance for you:IMG_0380:

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A complicated story to explain why a young lady was in your truck, but I believe you.

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11 hours ago, Bron said:

Stoked for you! See some times nice guys for the win. Doing happy dance for you:IMG_0380:

can we see a video of that,

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We constantly need reminding that The World is Round.

Edited by jamesc
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As in, what goes round, comes round?

 

If so, I very much believe in that.

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2 hours ago, john berry said:

A complicated story to explain why a young lady was in your truck, but I believe you.

 

But you read it John so it worked, right? ;)

 

Actually the whole thing put me in a much better frame of mind after a bad morning finding failed mite treatments and sick bees. Driving along feeling miserable, then a little ray of sunshine gets into the truck, tells a great story about the other beekeeper, made me laugh, and gives me 2 bee sites. By days end I wasn't feeling too bad at all.  :12_slight_smile:

Edited by Alastair
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Hopefully you will find what I did and that was that some apiarys were affected a lot worse than others. Also despite what a lot of people have said I have found that apivar does have enough quick knockdown to save badly infected hives if they are not beyond redemption.

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Yes that's the conundrum I've been thinking about John. Some apiaries may be affected and some not. So I'll be trying to figure with each hive if the treatment has worked, and only give apivar to those in need. But the thing is, a hive may look fine, but I won't know for sure there's near zero mites in it unless I test, which is too big an undertaking for the number of hives far as I'm concerned.

 

I normally do a mid winter check of all hives which is less than 3 months away, so will probably take some apivar with me on that round also and treat anything that slipped through the cracks and needs it at that time.

Edited by Alastair

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25 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Yes that's the conundrum I've been thinking about John. Some apiaries may be affected and some not. So I'll be trying to figure with each hive if the treatment has worked, and only give apivar to those in need. But the thing is, a hive may look fine, but I won't know for sure there's near zero mites in it unless I test, which is too big an undertaking for the number of hives far as I'm concerned.

 

I normally do a mid winter check of all hives which is less than 3 months away, so will probably take some apivar with me on that round also and treat anything that slipped through the cracks and needs it at that time.

 

Alastair I'd guess you thought about using Formic for a quick knock-back on these hives?  Interested perhaps why you are not using it (it would be the first thing I'd reach for). I'm presuming you think Apivar will get on top of the problem and give you another 2-3 months treatment, and no point in double treating?

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Loved the good karma story Alastair. Wonder if the failed treatment could be a varroa bomb from unseen nearby apiaries - in the USA, it seems to be a growing problem as erks subscribe to the mystical 'treatment free' dogma - usually for the first few hives they get (and buy replacements for), add in those starting first year beekeeping here as commercials with large numbers of hives in their first year, could be part of the problem.

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4 hours ago, jamesc said:

The World is Round.

im looking out the window know and it looks flat to me.

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3 hours ago, Sailabee said:

Loved the good karma story Alastair. Wonder if the failed treatment could be a varroa bomb from unseen nearby apiaries - in the USA, it seems to be a growing problem as erks subscribe to the mystical 'treatment free' dogma - usually for the first few hives they get (and buy replacements for), add in those starting first year beekeeping here as commercials with large numbers of hives in their first year, could be part of the problem.

 

It's possible Sailabee, however a couple weeks ago I found a heavy varroa infestation in one hive only, that had strips for the full treatment period, but put it down as one of lifes little mysteries. But now at a different apiary, the whole apiary bar one hive with mite issues when they shouldn't. Could be mite bombs at both, but my gut feel is there's more to it. Guess I'll know once I get into  few more apiaries next week.

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Interesting,  Alistair, nice to hear you ended at the right end of the stick this time.

I got the feeling I am treating all year round now and no honey to show for. I don't understand commercials can make a living out of this.

I used oxalic (4wks), july 17

bayverol oct17

formic acid nov 17 because of high mite fall,

apivar febr 18 after seeing deformed wings

after a week mite count, still 20 and 3 in two hives,

march 18, oxalic acid

 

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Don't worry you are not the only one who didn't get any honey in Dairy Flat. ;)

 

Just leave those apivar strips in up to 10 weeks and let them do their job. Long as they are placed correctly it will work.

 

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53 minutes ago, Alastair said:

 

Don't worry you are not the only one who didn't get any honey in Dairy Flat. ;)

 

Just leave those apivar strips in up to 10 weeks and let them do their job. Long as they are placed correctly it will work.

 

is it called dairy flat cause of the dairy farms.?

don't they have lots of clover and buttercup and lotus on the farms

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Used to be dairy but now it's all lifestyle blocks, houses everywhere.

 

There's a few patches of bush that are productive otherwise it's a green desert. One site there of mine did well, the others basically needed nursing all year.

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12 hours ago, Alastair said:

Used to be dairy but now it's all lifestyle blocks, houses everywhere.

 

There's a few patches of bush that are productive otherwise it's a green desert. One site there of mine did well, the others basically needed nursing all year.

A green desert ?

What's in the pasture.?

Are urban areas pretty reliable for honey flow.

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@ctm, both spring and autumn four weeks after you had put in plastic strips, you then used a strong acid while they were still in the hive, effectively destroying the remaining active ingredient in the strips. Neither Bayvarol or Apivar were designed to complete their treatment in four weeks. I don't see that as reasonable investment. I realise that many are doing this, but is not going to give the strips a fair go. 

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22 hours ago, Alastair said:

 

Don't worry you are not the only one who didn't get any honey in Dairy Flat. ;)

 

Just leave those apivar strips in up to 10 weeks and let them do their job. Long as they are placed correctly it will work.

 

Well this time I took the thymol based one (Apivar life). They say on strip per hive and renew them every week for 4 weeks. About collecting honey in dairy flat. It has never been an issue like 10-5 years ago. However the last 3 years were really pathetic and my gut feel something has changed.

 

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46 minutes ago, Sailabee said:

@ctm, both spring and autumn four weeks after you had put in plastic strips, you then used a strong acid while they were still in the hive, effectively destroying the remaining active ingredient in the strips. Neither Bayvarol or Apivar were designed to complete their treatment in four weeks. I don't see that as reasonable investment. I realise that many are doing this, but is not going to give the strips a fair go. 

I had them in for 6 weeks, according to the requirements. I wait for a week, if mitefall is still to high a grab formic acid to correct. So start early october 17, half november out, wait a week and end of november formic acid. No, all done by the book and in the middle of brood so they are clean in december when the honey flow starts.

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16 minutes ago, ctm said:

 (Apivar life). 

 

Api Life Var. Totally different product to Apivar. It's a pity the names are similar and confuse people.

 

Just wondering Ctm how you place the strips in the hives? Apivar, for example normally works well and no further treatment is required, but the strips must be placed mid brood area. I see so many people (even yesterday) put the strips outside edge of the brood nest, or end of the frames. Then quite often it doesn't work.

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8 hours ago, kaihoka said:

A green desert ?

What's in the pasture.?

Are urban areas pretty reliable for honey flow.

 

Well problem is it's not really urban. It's blocks of a hectare or maybe up to 3 or 4 hectares, some of them get mowed and some have some token livestock, but either way there is little in the pasture for bees. One year there was a late pennyroyal flowering which made about a box a hive but that hasn't happened again. A lot of these folks don't decorate their gardens with flowers like city dwelling folks, from a bees perspective it is pretty barren.

 

Dairy Flat is also used as a dumping ground by several migratory beekeepers and I'm not sure but think that may be part of the problem. They dump large apiaries up to 200 hives, and expect to feed their bees sugar through the time they are there as the beekeepers have no expectation the bees will get anything naturally.

 

A few weeks back I was asked to AFB check 2 hobby hives in Dairy Flat. All looked calm when I arrived but within seconds of opening the first hive I noticed robbers starting. Which quickly became so intense I had to really hurry to get the two hives done, then reduced the hive entrances down to a couple of bees and gave the owner who was with me instructions for the next few days. Drove out and on the road maybe 100 meters away from the hives there was now a swarm like activity of bees. Later found out from a commercial beekeeper there was a 200 hive apiary been dropped just a few hundred meters away but out of sight.

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37 minutes ago, ctm said:

I had them in for 6 weeks, according to the requirements. 

 

Bayvarol is 8 weeks Apivar 10 weeks. 

High mite fall at 4 weeks is to be expected because you have a lot of mites emerging with the bees from the brood area.

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On ‎24‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 10:48 AM, CraBee said:

 

Alastair I'd guess you thought about using Formic for a quick knock-back on these hives?  Interested perhaps why you are not using it (it would be the first thing I'd reach for). I'm presuming you think Apivar will get on top of the problem and give you another 2-3 months treatment, and no point in double treating?

 

Yes a few years ago when I used formic via nassenheider it was very effective it's a great treatment. But a few months later the nails in the boxes started rusting out, so I haven't done it again. If I switched over to a formic resistant nail it would be viable but for now I don't want to destroy all the boxes. Yes Apivar will do it this time around, turns out the rest of the sites I've been to are not so badly affected, but still quite a few sites to go.

 

But will have to formic proof my hives longer term, really do need to be alternating more kinds of treatments, and as we all know, try to get away from synthetics completely.

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