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Sheet Metal Beehives

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The link doesn't seam to work? It comes a contents type page and no mention of the hives.

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17 minutes ago, BRB said:

The link doesn't seam to work? It comes a contents type page and no mention of the hives.

Sorry, it does to. On the above link, click Field Days, then Innovation Award For Sheet Metal Beehives.

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Known as ''Innovation Hives,'' they are made of sheet metal, with a wool blend insulation, he said.

Quote

''They can be steam-cleaned, sanitised and re-used, saving money and reducing downtime.''

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Extensive testing had also been undertaken on the hives in Queenstown, which proved they could handle the extreme difference in temperatures from the hot summers through to the cold winters.

 

i have big doubts to those claims. 

metal is stinking hot in summer and cold in winter. very hard to insulate with such small thicknesses to work with.

steam cleaned and sanitised ?? these guys are not bekeepers thats for sure. >:(

  • Agree 1

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The ability to steam clean the hive box is interesting - IF the hive were infected with AFB would it be possible to process the hive box in such a way to allow it to be put back in service?

 

I also have concerns:

  • Condensation and then rot in the cavity where the wool is.
  • I do not have the details of the design but you would need a thermal break in the metal separating inside and outside surfaces (just like in thermal pain windows).
  • The thermal conductivity of wool is about the same as EPS (polystyrene) but the metal wrap around defeats the insulating qualities of the wall.
    • Thermal conductivity wool about:  0.042 W/mK
    • Thermal conductivity of EPS: 0.3 W/mK (so a little better)
    • Thermal conductivity of steel: about: 68 W/mK (or about 1000 times more conductive than the 'insulating' materials).  So the heat will go through the steel fast. 

I think the question is what type of hive has thermal characteristics that are close to a feral tree hive?  I have run thermal simulations of bee hives (winter and summer) and the EPS hives have thermal characteristics closer to feral tree hives than typical pine hives.

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1 hour ago, tristan said:

 

i have big doubts to those claims. 

metal is stinking hot in summer and cold in winter. very hard to insulate with such small thicknesses to work with.

steam cleaned and sanitised ?? these guys are not bekeepers thats for sure. >:(

Yes, I very much have doubts also. 

The display stand must have been inside the pavilion at the Field Days, the only area that I didn't have a look at - if I knew the display was there I would have made a point of having a look and asking a few questions.

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38 minutes ago, Mark Keown said:

The ability to steam clean the hive box is interesting - IF the hive were infected with AFB would it be possible to process the hive box in such a way to allow it to be put back in service?

 first of all is the legal side, you have to get the method approved and steam cleaning is not an approved method (because it doesn't work).

you could paraffin dip it. any insulation would have to be burnt, so you would have to replace the insulation. plus fairly high odds of the paraffin dipping would cause the steel box to warp. how much i couldn't say.

 

38 minutes ago, Mark Keown said:

Condensation and then rot in the cavity where the wool is.

thats a really good point. the insulation would have to be solid (eg polystyrene) because any wool type product is going to hold onto moisture. the exact same issue in homes.

insulation traps water causing rot or rust. plus the insulation doesn't work if it gets wet.

 

we had a sample metal box and base that someone send to us (no idea who made it). it was really hot to handle, not something you would want to pick up without gloves on. the top/bottom edges are really slippery (i would not like to do one of my big hives with it as they would just slide off) and the insulation was really poor.

i think it ended up in the scrap bin.

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Great to be thinking outside the box...

wont be using Formic acid treatments with these hives for long?

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it's all obsolete as the flow hive 2 is coming :)

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8 minutes ago, Borage said:

Has anyone tried these and able to give some feedback?

https://innovationhives.co.nz/about-1/

 

 

Other than the designers/builders, I would say you’re going to struggle to find a person on here that’s used them

 

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8 hours ago, Borage said:

Has anyone tried these and able to give some feedback?

https://innovationhives.co.nz/about-1/

 

that looks like the ones we had a sample of.

i can't be sure as the site shows no useful info and some of it sounds poor. 20mm thick insulation and still compatible box ????

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