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jamesc

AFB Dogs

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@Sil29er hi thanks for the message. We have a dog based in the Waikato that is with Jan and Rob Francis. Their phone number is 027 251 5470 , or email : detectafb@gmail.com. Just tell them that you have spoken to me. Let me know if you need any assistance. Rene

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Thanks, @Rene Gloor .  Hi @Sil29er, please feel free to drop us an email with regards to your requirements.  (detectafb@gmail.com).  It is currently still too warm and the bees too active to inspect hives, however, we are ready to roll as soon as the conditions are suitable.  We will be planning trips over to the BOP and will do inspections for multiple clients over a few mornings/nights.  We will post on our FB page and this forum once the conditions are conducive to inspections.  We are very excited to be involved in providing this wonderful tool to the industry to assist with the elimination of AFB and to be involved in the AFB Detector Dog Programme being driven by Rene, James and Richelle. 

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On 2/24/2018 at 4:34 PM, Alastair said:

Well all you did was ask a question.

 

AFB has been around for thousands of years at the least so in that sense it is not caused, or at least created, by humans. 

 

Now, with moveable frame hives and other modern innovations and management practises, such as, say, keeping a whole lot of hives all within a few meters of each other, the disease can be spread by humans. So in that sense, it could be said to be "caused" by humans.

 

Because the potential of AFB spreading by humans is now much greater with modern agricultural methods of farming bees, AFB also has to be controlled by humans or it would probably wipe out the species.

Alastair, i don't agree with your assumption. i would be a lot happier with a 1000 hives next to mine looked after by a competent beekeeper than 10 hives by an idiot who doesn't know what they are doing. (yes there would be other problems no doubt to sort out) and the movement of the above mention 1000 hives would not pose an afb risk either. 

We have to understand that afb can be dealt with very easy if everyone knew what to look for  and opened their eyes and inspected their hives regularly, so in that sense yes it is a beekeeper management problem. 

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I agree with your statement Dennis, other than the "easy" part. I don't see where it is that you disagree with my "assumption".

 

As to the "easy" part, yeah, it's all easy for a beekeeper if they just find the odd hive infected, burn it, and problem solved. Where it is not "easy", is when you have problem neighbours who allow afb infected hives full of honey to be robbed, and your bees store that honey and the disease keeps popping up in hives for another couple of years. Only way to beat that is strict quarantine, and keeping track of not just every box, but every frame, from exposed colonies. Which in a big outfit can be a very logistical, time consuming, and expensive exercise.

Edited by Alastair

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2 hours ago, Alastair said:

Which in a big outfit can be a very logistical, time consuming, and expensive exercise.

But not impossible, we run over 3500, have bad neigbours in an area and have quarantine sites that don't get shifted, AFB checked EVERY round, all frames marked to site and boxes tagged, all gear kept seperate... it's still cheaper than burning hives at the end of the day.

My team has burnt whole sites at a time, clearly robbed something sick and weak and the worse bit is not knowing where that hive is sitting. 

 

Maybe repeat offenders should be fined the cost of the dogs to go through all their colonies and burn on K9 indication, by law. 

 

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23 hours ago, jamesc said:

I read an interesting article in one of the Farming papers on the weekend ..... reporting that MPI and the Agency had managed to put together 270k of funding for research into an AFB supressing/killing bacteria. 

This one maybe?Screenshot_20180307-065429.thumb.jpg.83c5f4523daa49def44b29d5de0af98b.jpg

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12 minutes ago, Daniel Benefield said:

This one maybe?Screenshot_20180307-065429.thumb.jpg.83c5f4523daa49def44b29d5de0af98b.jpg

thats the one

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We have some pretty amasing scientists.

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Heather has been discovering bacteriophages ("phages") for sometime now and so is well-equipped to hunt for some suitable ones for AFB use. This area has been explored already (and some isolates patented) - an example is here (open access): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4836486/pdf/kbac-06-01-1122698.pdf

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5 hours ago, JohnF said:

This area has been explored already

Indeed, and just because I can, the Forum search finds;  :)

 

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On ‎6‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 7:12 PM, Alastair said:

I agree with your statement Dennis, other than the "easy" part. I don't see where it is that you disagree with my "assumption".

 

As to the "easy" part, yeah, it's all easy for a beekeeper if they just find the odd hive infected, burn it, and problem solved. Where it is not "easy", is when you have problem neighbours who allow afb infected hives full of honey to be robbed, and your bees store that honey and the disease keeps popping up in hives for another couple of years. Only way to beat that is strict quarantine, and keeping track of not just every box, but every frame, from exposed colonies. Which in a big outfit can be a very logistical, time consuming, and expensive exercise.

Alastair, I was making comment about hives close together and the moving of hives part of your post, I get annoyed when people equate lots of hives and migratory beekeeping as the reason why when it comes to AFB.

Piss poor beekeeping husbandry is the reason why of AFB.

The easy part was if everyone was doing what they should be doing around AFB, yes you are right at the moment at times it ain't easy if you get hit with an infection in your outfit.

Closeness and numbers don't create infections, but yes certainly when there is an infection due to PPBeekeeping they can allow cross contamination very rapidly.

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3 hours ago, Dave Black said:

Indeed, and just because I can, the Forum search finds;  :)

 

 

 

That at was just last month's post wasn't it Dave? What do you mean nearly 4 years ago !

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Dennis let's put it this way. Before humans took up beekeeping, and bees lived in trees with non moveable combs,  the hives non migratory and for the most part widely spaced, AFB controlled itself. What's changed?

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11 hours ago, JohnF said:

 

 

That at was just last month's post wasn't it Dave? What do you mean nearly 4 years ago !

Have a look at the date 29 October 2014

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Hence the 'nearly 4 years ago' comment Trevor. . . 

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