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M4tt

Varroa control for beginner Beekeepers

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It is now mid February and it’s time to take the honey off your hives that you want to harvest . 

Timing is critical with varroa control and from now on as the bee numbers drop in your hive , the varroa numbers will increase . 

Every year , beekeepers lose hives through the winter to PMS and the best way to avoid this is to treat now and ensure your bees have enough feed stored in their hive for winter and spring . 

Mid February is about as late as you want to leave your varroa treatment . 

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I just picked up treatment yesterday, if the weather will be as nice as it is right know, treatment goes in this afternoon.

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Thanks m4tt, was looking for this exact information. One of my hives has had MAQs already but ordered their autumn treatment today which will go in as soon as the courier delivers it. 

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On 14/02/2018 at 7:54 PM, M4tt said:

It is now mid February and it’s time to take the honey off your hives that you want to harvest . 

Timing is critical with varroa control and from now on as the bee numbers drop in your hive , the varroa numbers will increase . 

Every year , beekeepers lose hives through the winter to PMS and the best way to avoid this is to treat now and ensure your bees have enough feed stored in their hive for winter and spring . 

Mid February is about as late as you want to leave your varroa treatment . 

I put my treatment in end of March.

I have just finished 4 weeks of OA.

I have a late flow and I will still take honey off.

How risky is it eating honey from a hive with strips left in.

The migrant beeks normally give me honey for having hives on my place but  I watched them put escape boards on on Wed and they were pulling out strips that had been in since before they put the hives there in late  November .

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10 hours ago, kaihoka said:

The migrant beeks normally give me honey for having hives on my place but  I watched them put escape boards on on Wed and they were pulling out strips that had been in since before they put the hives there in late  November .

That is extremely bad practice.  And a sure recipe for breeding resistance.

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5 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

That is extremely bad practice.  And a sure recipe for breeding resistance.

Yeah I was shocked when I saw it happening and told them how unhappy I was about their casual attitude.

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10 hours ago, kaihoka said:

I put my treatment in end of March.

I have just finished 4 weeks of OA.

I have a late flow and I will still take honey off.

How risky is it eating honey from a hive with strips left in.

The migrant beeks normally give me honey for having hives on my place but  I watched them put escape boards on on Wed and they were pulling out strips that had been in since before they put the hives there in late  November .

If the strips are in the brood boxes and they only take the supers off how much residue would be in the honey ???   Not suggesting it's a good idea, just curious. 

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1 hour ago, nikki watts said:

If the strips are in the brood boxes and they only take the supers off how much residue would be in the honey ???   Not suggesting it's a good idea, just curious. 

Plain and simple, It is illegal.  Bayvarol can be used in an emergency. This is not emergency practice, They are using the strip as a preventative.

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I was reading the Apivar website the other night and it seems a bit ho hum about residue. The accepted practice is to put strips in as he honey comes off. The catch is, we are taking honey off and moving bees to the Dew for Aphid Poo and need to put strips in. The way i read the info is that Apivar is so wonderfull no residues remain in the honey ...... so ..... what to do. We always used to use Bayvarol in the autumn as it could be used in emergency situations in a flow, and every late summer we had an emergency situation. A bit like organic beekeeeping and sugar feeding ..... every spring organic beekeepers have an emergency situation and feed syrup.

O/A cloths are great . I' not sure I'm brave enough yet to rely on them going into autumn for a good knock down, but then again, the sugar shakes and alchohol washes we have done have revealed a very low mite loading.

Big sigh .... long Hmmm.

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On 2/16/2018 at 10:25 AM, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Plain and simple, It is illegal.  Bayvarol can be used in an emergency. This is not emergency practice, They are using the strip as a preventative.

 

I imagine it’s common practice for anyone putting hives in Manuka up in the far north. 

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On 2/16/2018 at 8:35 AM, kaihoka said:

Yeah I was shocked when I saw it happening and told them how unhappy I was about their casual attitude.

 

What was their reply ?

thats pretty bad management 

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11 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

I imagine it’s common practice for anyone putting hives in Manuka up in the far north. 

Yes.  But common practice does not make it lawful.  

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33 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Yes.  But common practice does not make it lawful.  

 

No of course not but I’m pretty sure it’s a widespread practice which is why we will have major problems with residues in wax and honey in the not too distant future 

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The manufactures say there is no problem with residue:18_kissing_heart:

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2 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

What was their reply ?

thats pretty bad management 

There lead guy was new and did not know much about it and looked awkward when I drew attention to the strips.

He said he would talk to his boss about my concerns.

I have talked to the boss before and he seemed  fairly unconcerned about varroa. He has been a commercial beek for 40 yrs .

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Was talking about this with one of our serbian beekeepers the other day, they ran experiments back home with amitraz residues and found after a month they had dissipated and broken down but there were still certain chemicals remaining present in the honey. 

I still think the base residues remain in the propolis and wax going forward therefore exposing generations of bees to them.. must have an effect on queens, and or drones.. maybe in the future we will feed a bee Viagra to help fix the problems 

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1 hour ago, kaihoka said:

There lead guy was new and did not know much about it and looked awkward when I drew attention to the strips.

He said he would talk to his boss about my concerns.

I have talked to the boss before and he seemed  fairly unconcerned about varroa. He has been a commercial beek for 40 yrs .

Hmmm .... I wish i could be unconcerned about Varroa.  AFB, no concern. Varroa, major concern.

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8 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

No of course not but I’m pretty sure it’s a widespread practice which is why we will have major problems with residues in wax and honey in the not too distant future 

I am sure you are correct.  I know a few that have strips in their hives year round.  And usually just Bayvarol.  So sad, but true.

 

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1 hour ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

I am sure you are correct.  I know a few that have strips in their hives year round.  And usually just Bayvarol.  So sad, but true.

 

So is it ok from a honey consumption  point of view to leave bayvarol in the hive but not Apivar.?

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6 hours ago, jamesc said:

Hmmm .... I wish i could be unconcerned about Varroa.  AFB, no concern. Varroa, major concern.

This beek very concerned about AFB

Synthetics still work down here. I think he will have varroa management issues when they fail .

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1 hour ago, kaihoka said:

So is it ok from a honey consumption  point of view to leave bayvarol in the hive but not Apivar.?

It says on the packet that bayvarol can be used in an emergency.  Do you want to eat the chemical ??

 

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2 hours ago, kaihoka said:

So is it ok from a honey consumption  point of view to leave bayvarol in the hive but not Apivar.?

 

I would eat the honey from a treated hive but then I’m not too fussy what goes in my mouth as long as it tastes good....I have the figure to prove it :) 

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