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Andywang

Organic beekeepers required

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Hi all, 

 

Im new to this forum and looking for some organic certified beekeepers whom could help with bulk commercial production and packaging.

 

Any assistance or guide would be much much appreciated!!!!

 

Thanks all!  

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No such thing is there?  Its impossible to achieve from what I've seen of people who've tried it. 

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I certify that my Honey is organic

None of my wax has ever had synthetics anywhere near it and my hives are in the back of beyond
In the lack of any other measure Ive made my own one up.

A steal at $20kg

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1 hour ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Is there such a thing. as Organic Certified Beekeepers.

anyone can do organic beekeeping.

there is certified organic honey, but afaik they don't certify beekeepers.

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The main criteria are: Beehives must be sited more than 3km from any areas of intensive agriculture.
 

The vegetation surrounding the beehives must be primarily “spontaneous vegetation”.
 

The bees‘ winter feed honey cannot be replaced with sugar syrup (a common practice in conventional beekeeping). The honeybees must be left with enough honey for themselves.
 

All honey we produce must be traceable back to the producing beehives (no bulk blending or cross blending).
No synthetic chemicals or any types of antibiotics to be used in the organic beehives (again, common practices in conventional beekeeping). 

 

Honey must never be heated above 37ºC, to protect the natural properties such as enzymes.
 

Synthetic chemicals of any sort must never have been used within the beehives or equipment

 

From here.

 

That lot raises a few questions for me. Who’s antibioticing their bees? Is that something that happens here? And how are they varroa treating? OA?

Edited by cBank

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34 minutes ago, cBank said:

The main criteria are: Beehives must be sited more than 3km from any areas of intensive agriculture.
 

The vegetation surrounding the beehives must be primarily “spontaneous vegetation”.
 

The bees‘ winter feed honey cannot be replaced with sugar syrup (a common practice in conventional beekeeping). The honeybees must be left with enough honey for themselves.
 

All honey we produce must be traceable back to the producing beehives (no bulk blending or cross blending).
No synthetic chemicals or any types of antibiotics to be used in the organic beehives (again, common practices in conventional beekeeping). 

 

Honey must never be heated above 37ºC, to protect the natural properties such as enzymes.
 

Synthetic chemicals of any sort must never have been used within the beehives or equipment

 

From here.

 

That lot raises a few questions for me. Who’s antibioticing their bees? Is that something that happens here? And how are they varroa treating? OA?

OA, FA, Thymol might be the only options that come close
Its totally doable

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What classes as “intensive agriculture”

pretty sure there’s a large commercial near here that’s classed organic. 

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I do know of a commercial beekeeper in Auckland area who was certified organic. That's until it was found they were using synthetic treatments same as everyone else, so their organic certification was taken away. But even now years later they are still even now advertising themselves as organic beekeepers, and getting a premium for their honey. 

 

Be careful who you choose Andywang.

Edited by Alastair
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11 hours ago, cBank said:

The main criteria are: Beehives must be sited more than 3km from any areas of intensive agriculture.
..........

The bees‘ winter feed honey cannot be replaced with sugar syrup............

 

i'm not up on the current rules but last i had heard it was down to 1km from intensive agriculture. 

 but what about peoples homes, which are some of the worse places for chemical usage?

afaik they can use and are known to use organic sugar.

every time i've looked at their requirements it seams to change. the standards seam to get looser as the honey price goes up.

 

certified organic is a trademark so can't be used without permission. however organic is not, anyone can use that.

while there are really good people out there that do things really well, theres a ton that use organic as an excuse to up the profit margin :(

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16 minutes ago, tristan said:

 

i'm not up on the current rules but last i had heard it was down to 1km from intensive agriculture. 

 but what about peoples homes, which are some of the worse places for chemical usage?

afaik they can use and are known to use organic sugar.

every time i've looked at their requirements it seams to change. the standards seam to get looser as the honey price goes up.

 

certified organic is a trademark so can't be used without permission. however organic is not, anyone can use that.

while there are really good people out there that do things really well, theres a ton that use organic as an excuse to up the profit margin :(

I wouldn't hesitate to call bush honey that is from Organic Acid treated hives  Organic.

We should take that for granted.

 

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27 minutes ago, Philbee said:

I wouldn't hesitate to call bush honey that is from Organic Acid treated hives  Organic.

We should take that for granted.

 

depends a bit.

when the hives are sitting in the middle of the bush for sure,

but a lot of the time those hives are sitting in a farmers paddock which would rule it out for certified organic so i wouldn't call it organic either.

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Philbee said:

I wouldn't hesitate to call bush honey that is from Organic Acid treated hives  Organic.

We should take that for granted.

 

I'd agree fully with that. 

I also enjoy eating organic wild meat carried off the hill in my old Mac Pac pack. 

Something very organic about alpine daisy eating Chamois meat. 

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20 minutes ago, tristan said:

depends a bit.

when the hives are sitting in the middle of the bush for sure,

but a lot of the time those hives are sitting in a farmers paddock which would rule it out for certified organic so i wouldn't call it organic either.

 

 

Depends what they are on

If they are leaving the hive on the fence line  heading out into the bush for those big stands of Rewa I'd say thats about as pure Honey as can be.
Maybe if they switch to clover then there is the possibility they could be picking up some pasture residues etc

 

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So just so I understand, is anyone able to call themselves organic, if they feel like it, with no legal consequence?

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3 hours ago, Philbee said:

Depends what they are on

If they are leaving the hive on the fence line  heading out into the bush for those big stands of Rewa I'd say thats about as pure Honey as can be.
Maybe if they switch to clover then there is the possibility they could be picking up some pasture residues etc

 

the argument there is pollen comes from a variety of sources, not just from what they gather nectar from. therefore they could pick up anything.

thats why they have the 3km of "organic land" rule. only way to ensure everything coming into the hive is "organic".

 

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2 hours ago, Alastair said:

So just so I understand, is anyone able to call themselves organic, if they feel like it, with no legal consequence?

thats generally the case. however they could be done for false advertising, but theres loopholes in that to.

a lot of it is just marketing and creating an image for people to buy into.

 

remember the case some years back with a guy who was buying cheap eggs from a supermarket then repackaging them and selling them as organic free range eggs. $$$$.

had one a while back with a producer who makes a product and sells it to high end restaurants, but the produce they sold locally, with all the same labeling etc, was all imported . $$$$

 

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Yes I remember those cases and was particularly annoyed about the eggs, as I think battery chook cages are barbaric and always pay more to get free range eggs. Then I discover I've probably been supporting the battery cage industry, just, paying a lot more for the eggs.

 

The organic beekeepers I refer to are pretty blatant about it. I'm not going to name them, but they are out there in public with facebook and other pages, and can certainly be googled, using a term such as for example, Organic Beekeepers Auckland

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yeah those types are a joke.

"organic honey" from xyz bush/range/hill that just happens to be full of houses, where loads of misused chemical sprays are used on.

or from places where there is simply no such thing as 3km radius of natural bush.

 

unfortunately they take away from the people who do go to all the effort of doing certified organic. 

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Yes what is surprising to me is how they can be so blatantly dishonest and get away with it. On their site they rubbish other beekeepers for using nasty chemicals when they treat their own hives twice yearly with the same chemicals, they rubbish other beekeepers for feeding sugar when they themselves feed sugar, they are contacted by magazines and even TV to contribute articles about organics, and generally present themselves as a little sanctuary of organic goodness, when they are the complete opposite. 

 

However, it does pay, their sugar and pesticide loaded honey is attractively packaged and sells at a big premium.

Edited by Alastair
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If the guys doing Manuka  down past Turangi and out the Napier road were onto it they would be calling their Manuka Honey "Oganic"
 

 

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7 hours ago, Alastair said:

So just so I understand, is anyone able to call themselves organic, if they feel like it, with no legal consequence?

Yes.

But you can not say , certified organic .

Unless you are .

Biogro. Biodynamic etc.

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What about all the 1080 and wasp bait that's put out in the bush

Edited by glynn

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Bad if you are trying to be organic, good if you want rata.

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