Jump to content
PhilEvans

4 bee stings to eyelids - advice needed

Recommended Posts

Needing urgent advice please.

I've just been stung twice on each eyelid and they are swelling fast. I am not alergic as such, but stings on my face usually end up with swollen eyelids...

 

I have taken 3 Razene antihistamine, but need to know if there is anything else that may help keep the swelling down. Cold pack? Baking soda poultice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have Lemon Balm in the garden?

crush and apply topically. 

We’ve found it helps

  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Beefriendly said:

Do you have Lemon Balm in the garden?

crush and apply topically. 

We’ve found it helps

I was given a small plant a week ago, and its still in transplant shock, with only a few very small leaves. I've crushed a few leaves, but there is nothing left when crushed...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Jezza said:

Why take a chance?

 

Now: head down to the Emergency GP.

 

Later: wear a veil.

The main prob is the swelling and maybe both eyes closing. I am not allergic, so emergency would be pointless.
As for veil, I always wear a full suit when opening the hives. I had noticed a lot of activity around 1 of my hives, and had just started filming with the gopro on a long selfie stick. The camera was just coming close to the activity , and I was just beside a smaller hive, and the stick dropped briefly in front of the smaller hive entrance. I guess that did it, and their security force attacked...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Jezza said:

Why take a chance?

 

Now: head down to the Emergency GP.

 

Later: wear a veil.

 

Prevention is better than cure....

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Jezza said:

Why take a chance?

 

Now: head down to the Emergency GP.

 

Later: wear a veil.

 

I need to check, but 3 Razene sounds like a lot. 

 

But if your eyes both swell, they may even give you oral steroids

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, PhilEvans said:

The main prob is the swelling and maybe both eyes closing. I am not allergic, so emergency would be pointless.

 

I was thinking you could get some high power anti histamines quickly if need be.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Josh said:

 

I need to check, but 3 Razene sounds like a lot. 

Razene is 10mg per tab, the instructions say not to exceed 20mg per day, As a one off, I thing 30mg will be OK...
It is usually a one per day for hayfever, but I only take 1 after a sting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Jezza said:

 

I was thinking you could get some high power anti histamines quickly if need be.

mmm, good thinking...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Might be worth giving healthline a call. Depends a little on who answers, but sometimes you get great advice for free, quickly. Other times they just tell you to go to a doctor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing else to do, from here you just got to tough it out.

 

Taking Razene was a good move, taken immediately after the sting it's pretty effective. 

 

The eyes do swell when stung, even on me. It's so easy to rub your eyes when they itch, that's an urge you need to resist over the next couple days as it does feel good, but aggravates the swelling. Take another 2 Razene tommorrow and after that you will be through the worst.

Edited by Alastair
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, cBank said:

Might be worth giving healthline a call. Depends a little on who answers, but sometimes you get great advice for free, quickly. Other times they just tell you to go to a doctor.

I did already phone my doctor, spoke to a nurse who said the only remedy they have is adrenaline for major reaction.

  • Agree 1
  • Disagree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the monster looking result 30 mins after the stings. Looks like only 2 stings - left eyelid got one, and the small swelling below the other eye got the other. Initially I felt 2 separate in each eye.

 

EyesSwelling.jpg.53763ba47f1461de6aaf101ad50afe00.jpg

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 2
  • Sad 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice one! 

 

You'll have to update with pics at say, one day and two days. :)

Edited by Alastair
  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And oh, just keep your hand away from it. Any rubbing that will make things much worse.

 

Luckily looks like you should have at least one good eye tommorrow that you can see out of!

Edited by Alastair
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, PhilEvans said:

EyesSwelling.jpg.53763ba47f1461de6aaf101ad50afe00.jpg

 

That photo will haunt my dreams...

  • Agree 1
  • Haha 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, PhilEvans said:

I have taken 3 Razene antihistamine,

The recommended dose is 10mg for a fit adult. 20 is regarded and an overdose so 30 definitely is. And you risk complications to your central nervous system and liver. There is no antidote, but if you start getting dizzy or shaky then you will need symptomatic medical help. 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jezza said:

Why take a chance?

 

Now: head down to the Emergency GP.

 

Later: wear a veil.

Agree, a lost opportunity too, because you're not a pharmacist.

 

From another of the Forum's lost reference documents...

 

"Most reactions are local and confined to the general area of the sting with pain and a swollen itch, but over 24 – 48 hours they can develop into a much larger area (sometimes the entire extremity. A few hours after the sting more redness, oedema (swelling), and itching develop. Over 12 – 48 hours, the area can become quite swollen, painful, and may also have some associated bruising. The swelling generally begins to resolve after two days, but the site may remain tender (and continue to itch) for a few more days. The total reaction lasts 4 – 7 days. Large locals around the face and mouth or on the hands may cause temporary disability. The large local is IgE-mediated, and therefore is an allergic response. Treatment of local reactions includes ice and elevation with non-aspirin containing analgesics (Ibuprofen), both H1 and H2-receptor blocking antihistamines (diphenhydramine, (Benadryl), famotidine, ranitidine, and non-sedating ones, such as fexofenadine (Allegra), loratidine (Claritin), and ceterizine (Zyrtec), and, occasionally, systemic corticosteroids, such as methylprednisolone, or prednisone, in doses tapered over 2-3 days. Aspirin-containing analgesics should be avoided because both bee and wasp stings may be complicated by local subcutaneous hemorrhage. Taking anti-histamine or a leukotriene-receptor antagonist very soon after the sting may decrease the late phase reaction. Leukotriene-receptor antagonists’ montelukast (Singulair) and zafirlukast (Accolate) block the leukotriene receptors on mast cells and eosinophils and both have peak activity 3 – 4 hours after taking them. In one study of six allergic beekeepers, the skin within their large local reaction and their blood and urine were analyzed 2 hours after a bee sting. Three of them had high histamine levels and the other three had high leukotriene levels, suggesting that allergic beekeepers either have high histamine release or increased leukotriene production, but not both. This implies that about half of beekeepers who have large local reactions might benefit from the immediate administration of a leukotriene inhibitor, whereas the other half would benefit from anti-histamines before or very soon after the sting Oral steroids are useful in treating large locals to stings around the face and hands. The small blisters sometimes formed on the sting wound should be left alone. It is possible to infect the wound if bits of the sting shaft remain or if adequate cleanliness is not observed."

 

Stings.pdf

  • Good Info 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anytime a hero brags about working with no veil... that photo should go up. 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I must have the world's quietest bees. I suspect they're mainly  Fraz's stock .

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, the question everyone was afraid to ask. How you looking today Phil?

 

(I'm guessing it's bad but you should be getting over the hill tommorrow).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Alastair said:

So, the question everyone was afraid to ask. How you looking today Phil?

Here are 2 pics, after 8hs and 26hrs.
I didn't take a pic first thing this morning when my left eye was sealed shut until about 11am, and the right was about half shut, just the lower half.

 

EyeSwelling8hrs.jpg.4a062f78247be79dfae4398227211ca6.jpg

 

EyeSwell26hrs.jpg.2093a31bb0b9c74d4630bdff30c63e96.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...