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tom sayn

landowner honey

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7 hours ago, flash4cash said:

Do you think you could handle a piece of this @kaihoka ? 

 

Cold Manuka Smoked Goat Gouda made by Meyer Cheese.

 

supreme winner at the 2017 NZ cheese awards

 

beat out 377 other cheeses ? we supplied the milk.

 

Trying to make a honey cheese but at the moment can not get the honey flavour to come through to the cheese. 

Image.png

You may need a strong honey like kamahi.

What sort of honey do you have .

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On 12/18/2017 at 11:57 AM, tom sayn said:

any suggestions?

buy some land maybe? 

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1 hour ago, kaihoka said:

@flash4cash wow that cheese is really something.

Is that what you pay your landowners with ? Lucky landowners.

How many goats do you milk? . I have a friend that milks goats , she loves her goats.

I had a job at a sheep milk cheese factory washing the rinds.

I got to take home all the off cuts and such like.

Best job perk ever.:14_relaxed:

Was that sheep farm Nedoft?  I use to love their cheese.  Yes that is 1 of the cheeses I will give them.  We milk 1500 goats and they all have names..

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1 hour ago, flash4cash said:

Was that sheep farm Nedoft?  I use to love their cheese.  Yes that is 1 of the cheeses I will give them.  We milk 1500 goats and they all have names..

Yes it was neudorf.

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10 hours ago, flash4cash said:

We milk 1500 goats and they all have names..

I can imagine what your roll call sounds like........shades of Ashley Clinton Sheep Choir....

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It is actually a lot easy to remember names than numbers. Maybe I should name all my hives....Dorothy, Rudolf, meatball...yes these are goats names we use.

Edited by flash4cash
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14 hours ago, flash4cash said:

Since I like going off topic.  What do we think the chances of the government planting 1 million tree that thouse trees could be Manuka? 

 

What would be the cost/benefit vs say pine trees which is what I assume they would plant? Would we not get a faster return on Investment.  Makes sense to me

 

I think they're actually planning on a 1 billion, total thus far: 0...

 

I believe some of that will be riparian planting and planting for erosion control, so it won't all be Radiata. I think the long growth time of pine would be an advantage in their eyes as it's more about co2 than economic return.

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I certainly would be interested who and how they will decide.  There is a real opportunity for the bee industry to get a win/win here.  Especially for trees that help with shoulder season to the main flows. If they are interested in bee health than that would really help and provided cost savings to beekeepers. 

 

I would be surprise if if they get much achieved before the next election in terms of trees in the ground.  Governments move so slow.

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18 minutes ago, flash4cash said:

Maybe I should name all my hives

I started naming my hive queens- alphabetically.....Alexandrina, Boudica, Cleopatra, Diana......then after a couple of re-queens it got hard to remember so just named the hives- and the names are now family:14_relaxed:

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13 hours ago, kaihoka said:

You may need a strong honey like kamahi.

What sort of honey do you have .

I just have clover, maybe not even that probably just field honey. I liked the idea of going full circle.  Bees get the nectar and the goats eat the flowers, combine the 2 all from the same farm.

 

I do like the idea of also using other honeys to with time, if we can get it to work.  Anything to move up the value chain for all of NZ honeys which I think are great.  We should appreciate and value what we have and produce.  It is world class something I think we NZers forgot sometimes.  They just have to be marketed well and make sure the primary producer can share in the value created. 

Edited by flash4cash

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42 minutes ago, Jezza said:

 

I think they're actually planning on a 1 billion, total thus far: 0...

 

I believe some of that will be riparian planting and planting for erosion control, so it won't all be Radiata. I think the long growth time of pine would be an advantage in their eyes as it's more about co2 than economic return.

Yes, but plantation forest is worth less in CO2 terms than permanent forest. Manuka is a pioneer species. So imagine 1 billion Manuka trees as a precursor to re-establishing native forest. I reckon it could be an easy sell for the current government and a win for the Greens. 

 

Meanwhile the beekeeping industry....

Edited by Rob Stockley
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25 minutes ago, Rob Stockley said:

Yes, but plantation forest is worth less in CO2 terms than permanent forest. Manuka is a pioneer species. So imagine 1 billion Manuka trees as a precursor to re-establishing native forest. I reckon it could be an easy sell for the current government and a win for the Greens. 

 

Meanwhile the beekeeping industry....

 

For 28 years it's worth a lot each year, then it loses 75%-80% (I think) of it's credits during harvesting, then if replanted the credits start up again. Permanent Forest is more of a small yearly increase.

 

Presumably almost all the Manuka that would be planted could be pulled out if the market for Manuka Honey crashes at a massive cost of $$ + co2. The Radiata industry is over 100 years old so much more stable.

 

My personal opinion is that if the gummint is going to spend our tax dollars on trees, Manuka planting should be left out as a private risk for the time being. Riparian and Radiata is a better balance between risk, and permanent and non-permanent credits, with the advantage that it should all have some economic benefit, either by producing saw logs or better water quality.

 

My two cents anyway.

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@Jezza I like what you're saying, but.....

After the war massive swathes of marginal countryside were cleared for farms that eventually failed. The legacy of that activity is massive erosion and silting of rivers.

 

IMHO replanting some of the high country could be just as beneficial to New Zealand as riparian planting. We need to leverage carbon trading to maximise non-tangible benefits.

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21 minutes ago, Rob Stockley said:

IMHO replanting some of the high country could be just as beneficial to New Zealand as riparian planting. We need to leverage carbon trading to maximise non-tangible benefits.

Let the high country regenerate and plant the hopelessly water deficient alluvial flats in pine. (the exact opposite of what Ngai Tahu has just done near Hanmer)

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44 minutes ago, Rob Stockley said:

@Jezza I like what you're saying, but.....

After the war massive swathes of marginal countryside were cleared for farms that eventually failed. The legacy of that activity is massive erosion and silting of rivers.

 

IMHO replanting some of the high country could be just as beneficial to New Zealand as riparian planting. We need to leverage carbon trading to maximise non-tangible benefits.

 

That's a good idea, I hadn't thought about it that way, but it would mean the government would need to use a lot of the money they would have used on trees to buy the marginal eroded land for bush regen. The farmers aren't going to give it away, while they will give away a strip of land for Riparian (and keep ownership), as they can see it lessens the risk of resource consent problems, irrigation worries, complaints from us townies, etc., etc.. 

 

They'd probably be much less total trees in the end if we go the Maunka on eroding land way...

Edited by Jezza

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19 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Let the high country regenerate and plant the hopelessly water deficient alluvial flats in pine. (the exact opposite of what Ngai Tahu has just done near Hanmer)

Yes and no.

It would be interesting to see what regenerates on alluvial flats.

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3 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

It would be interesting to see what regenerates on alluvial flats.

I'm not suggesting that.

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2 minutes ago, yesbut said:

I'm not suggesting that.

I realise that , and your original suggestion made sense.

Did I understand correctly that Maori are regening the flats and planting the hills.

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2 hours ago, flash4cash said:

I just have clover, maybe not even that probably just field honey. I liked the idea of going full circle.  Bees get the nectar and the goats eat the flowers, combine the 2 all from the same farm.

 

I do like the idea of also using other honeys to with time, if we can get it to work.  Anything to move up the value chain for all of NZ honeys which I think are great.  We should appreciate and value what we have and produce.  It is world class something I think we NZers forgot sometimes.  They just have to be marketed well and make sure the primary producer can share in the value created. 

Would you like me to send you some kamahi / rata honey to experiment with.

A very runny honey with a distinct flavour.

I tried to PM you but it bounced 

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45 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Did I understand correctly that Maori are regening the flats and planting the hills.

No. Ngai Tahu are converting big hunks of Balmoral Forest at Culverden to dairy. Dead flat alluvium.

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That is very kind of you and if we can get it to work I will definitely take you up on that offer.  For the record I am not making the cheese, Albert the ledgend from Mercer Cheese is trying to get it to work.  I just need to get some more honey from the girls this year so we can try again. 

 

My PM does not work yet as I have not brought my sub yet

 

 

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1 hour ago, yesbut said:

No. Ngai Tahu are converting big hunks of Balmoral Forest at Culverden to dairy. Dead flat alluvium.

thats terrible.

i did misunderstand.

 

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10 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Would you like me to send you some kamahi / rata honey to experiment with.

A very runny honey with a distinct flavour.

I tried to PM you but it bounced 

Is all your honey bush type honey or do you get pasture honey as well? 

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59 minutes ago, Rob Stockley said:

Is all your honey bush type honey or do you get pasture honey as well? 

I am not near any farms but I have scrappy 2 odd acres of paddocks and lit-shirt of access tracks  with lots of clover.

It's Bush honey but light honey. I think lots of mahoe and hinau in it this  year.

And brambles , BlackBerry and lawyer vine .

And of course this year rata.

Pm if you want any rata . However it may not be 100%.

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Here the buttercup finished a couple of weeks ago, the dandelion is in full flower but the clover is going strong. My first box this season is a light coloured, liquid honey with a very pleasant hint of clover taste. I expect it will become more clover as the season progresses. 

 

It's several km from here to the bush edge so I don't expect any honey from there.

 

7 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Pm if you want any rata . However it may not be 100%.

 

 I would be very keen to trade some of our pasture honey for something different. Thanks

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