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Beekeeper investigated after discovery of 22 dead hives in Auckland

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Beekeeper investigated after discovery of 22 dead hives in Auckland. 

American Foulbrood Pest Management Plan inspected and tested the beehives in Bethells on December 14
National compliance manager Clifton King said 26 hives were discovered between two sites, 22 of which had died. 
But there were other reasons why the hives could have died, unrelated to a disease, including a failure to re-queen, he said. 
"It was difficult to tell why they died but the inspection was to make absolute sure there was no AFB detected. 
"Because 22 hives were dead, it would suggest that the hives were neglected and were not looked after properly."
King said the owner of the sites was being investigated because the hives were unregistered. 
All hives need to be registered in New Zealand to help in the eradicaton of AFB in managed colonies. 

https://i.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/western-leader/99851891/beekeeper-investigated-after-discovery-of-22-dead-hives-in-auckland

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Interesting, Multiple Queen failures

These guys wouldn't suggest it if it wasn't a real possibility

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4 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Interesting, Multiple Queen failures

Also known as chronic beekeeper incompetence syndrome. 

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Varroa is the most likely culprit or wasps especially if out West.  Multiple Queen failures seems an unlikely and odd reason.  

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40 minutes ago, CraBee said:

Varroa is the most likely culprit or wasps especially if out West.  Multiple Queen failures seems an unlikely and odd reason.  

Varroa is the obvious culprit but also an easy one to diagnose.

My point is that if Varroa is the likely culprit why haven't the investigators said so?

 

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7 hours ago, CraBee said:

Varroa is the most likely culprit or wasps especially if out West.  Multiple Queen failures seems an unlikely and odd reason.  

 

If the hives have been abandoned for a long time it’s possible they have gone queenless and dwindled away to nothing especially with the wet spring 

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I think you're going to have to forgive Clifton the comment about possible other reasons and ignore it. 

 

He's new to the job, and I think to beekeeping (though I did see he has other agricultural background, which gave me hope). 

 

It's the kind of comment a reporter jumps on to add a bit of mystery to a story, and will push for.... you say to them 'AFB in't the only possible reason', and then they push.. 'like what?'.... so you throw a comment that isn't complete or fully thought out and they grab it and run. 

 

I remember thinking similar about a comment he made to the HB Today reporter that did the story on our AFB a week or so ago.  'ooo.. Clifton... that doesn't really add to the impact - don't go weakening your message'. 

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Another person behind a desk who doesn’t know anything about beekeeping ?

 

its a shame we dont have more ex beekeepers in decision making positions maybe if we did we could get some good work happening in and around all things bees.

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Clifton's profile is here:  http://www.afb.org.nz/new-compliance-manager

 

actually it does say "His experience includes sector involvement with the bee industry, "  though it doesn't detail the nature of it. 

 

overall I thought it looked like a very good background for the job. 

 

TBH, an ex-beekeeper in that particular position doesn't really interest me.   I think a broader experience (but still agriculturally/natural systems) based gives us more opportunity for progress with the ability to look outside the box than someone who has spent their life doing just what we all do. 

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IMO Employing these types of non specific type people to manage Agriculture affairs is like building up production hives on the main flow

By the time the Hive is up to speed the flow is finished

Edited by Philbee
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4 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

Another person behind a desk who doesn’t know anything about beekeeping ?

 

its a shame we dont have more ex beekeepers in decision making positions maybe if we did we could get some good work happening in and around all things bees.

It's a shame that in my experience, in a few industries, the people at and near the top have no experience at or near the bottom.

Edited by Adam O'Sullivan
mis spelling
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I've just received this from Auckland Beekeepers Club.  Three AFB dead-outs @ Duffy's Road - take note anyone who has hives in that area:

 

"Correction - Waitakere AFB Update

 

The Waitakere AFB Update incorrectly stated that on Thursday 14 December 2017, 26 hives were inspected at apiaries at Bethells and Duffys Road. This was incorrect. Twenty-six hives were inspected on Bethells Road only. Only 4 hives were alive. No evidence of AFB was found in any of the hives including dead ones.

 

The Duffys Road apiary was inspected on Saturday 16 December 2016. Eighteen hives were inspected. Only 3 hives were alive. Five cases of AFB were detected. Two cases were in lives hives and 3 were deadouts. All the dead hives have been sealed. Arrangements are being made to destroy the infected hives within 7 days.

 

The Duffys Road apiary is unregistered and the Management Agency is currently making inquiries to identify the beekeeper. If the beekeeper is not identified within 30 days, the Management Agency will destroy the remaining hives in the apiary."

 

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20 minutes ago, CraBee said:

The Duffys Road apiary was inspected on Saturday 16 December 2016. Eighteen hives were inspected. Only 3 hives were alive. Five cases of AFB were detected. Two cases were in lives hives and 3 were deadouts. All the dead hives have been sealed. Arrangements are being made to destroy the infected hives within 7 days.

 

 

The Duffys Road apiary is unregistered and the Management Agency is currently making inquiries to identify the beekeeper. If the beekeeper is not identified within 30 days, the Management Agency will destroy the remaining hives in the apiary."

 

if the beekeeper comes forward then they need to have the book thrown at them: name and shame, prosecute/penalise as much as possible

and, if they don't come forward, then are there powers to enquire under the regs that will put the landowner at risk of prosecution if they don't assist in identifying the culprit beekeeper?

 

even if not identified, at least the negligent beekeeper loses 18 hives and all the kit so at least some deterrent perhaps.

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4 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

Saturday 16 December 2016

Is this date right ? 2016 ?

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40 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Is this date right ? 2016 ?

 

I'm sure it is meant to be 2017.  If not, they're just a wee bit over the seven days...

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You’d think you would catch that in an email correcting the original.

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1 hour ago, yesbut said:

Is this date right ? 2016 ?

 

No, it was a typo.

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