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Understanding the risks associated with tutin 2017


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On 1/19/2018 at 1:01 AM, jamesc said:

I guess it comes down to experience ..... knowing the area where you run your bees and the curved ball that may be thrown in your face.  

I notice the Tutu are spreading up this way as more land is used for pine plantations and the trees colonize the roadsides at the edge of the plantations that often border onto farmland. I don't think I will get anymore honey off my home apiary this year between the honey dew from the willows and the Tutu, the scolypopa are in high numbers around here now.

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Okay gents please settle down. At the risk of being shot down I'm going to defend the original post.    Tutin is a serious risk. It deserves  to be pushed, even if only for the benefit of ne

For those of you asking if ApiNZ is involved in any work on the management/eradication of scolypopa we have raised this with the Science and Research Focus Group which will be meeting earlier than usu

Hi Rob, as far as I know there is no direct research into the passionvine hopper issue, but there has been bits and pieces. The GWA research was done as a lot of other industries could see how th

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8 minutes ago, BJC said:

I notice the Tutu are spreading up this way as more land is used for pine plantations and the trees colonize the roadsides at the edge of the plantations that often border onto farmland. I don't think I will get anymore honey off my home apiary this year between the honey dew from the willows and the Tutu, the scolypopa are in high numbers around here now.

What was on the land before pines.

Tutu does not seem to like clay. It only establishes in loose soil , like slips 

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2 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

What was on the land before pines.

Tutu does not seem to like clay. It only establishes in loose soil , like slips 

Our place is 2.5 acres that was part of a 6,000 acre sheep and beef farm that had been cleared.  2,000 acres have been in pines for 28 years are being harvested, another 2,000 acres of cleared sheep and beef farm have been sold and planted with pines a few kilometers up the road and the Tutu just spread along the roadside once one or two establish themselves

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1 minute ago, frazzledfozzle said:

I hate pine plantations, they are ugly and serve absolutely no good purpose except the growing of timber. :( 

 

Yep, they get carbon credits too and the amount of debris that ends up in the streams and rivers is appalling.   The irony here is on a hot day they knock on the door and ask to fill their water bottles from our taps as the river they usually use is too dirty from their logging.

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17 minutes ago, Mummzie said:

Sad- and yet a quick google brings up this....

 

The Aropaoanui river flows from the Lake Tūtira to the Pacific Ocean in the Northern Hawkes Bay. It has been described as one of the cleanest rivers in New Zealand by the Department of Conservation,

I must remind them that Lake Tūtira is closed to all swimming and water activities due to the level of pollution and when it rains the Aropaoanui River often flows green right out to the sea once it clears the silt from the ever changing estuary.

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1 hour ago, BJC said:

The irony here is on a hot day they knock on the door and ask to fill their water bottles from our taps as the river they usually use is too dirty from their logging.

 

That’s worth worth passing on to papers, ministers and the company doing it. The fact that they can’t even water their own crew is bad enough, let alone the damage they are doing.

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Sad though it is there a lots of Kiwis that rely on the pines for an income, just like the farmers and the rest of us that use up our resources to make a living.  We are on a hiding to nothing with 8 million tons of plastic waste flowing into our oceans every year and that set to increase at least ten fold in a decade.    Anyways back to the Tutu, here is a picture from over our side fence of the pines.  The willows border the Aropaoanui River and the Tutu seeds once the logging has finished and populates the river banks and roadways.

View of the pines.jpeg

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I think the negatives of a pine forest are to do with human management .

 Like the  unnatural grid planting, often on steep dry hills that should never have the vegetation removed and the mess logging makes of water ways.

There are huge natural conifer forests in Asia and north America that are beautiful.

We have a semi abandoned 90 hectare pine forest behind us .

It has lots of pockets of native . We live in a wet area where the ground is full of native seeds.

Nothing stabilises a dirt road better than pine trees planted either side .

 

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On 1/18/2018 at 5:14 PM, meercat said:

Is tests per barrel or batch?

 

Testing can be at the batch or barrel level. If testing at the barrel level and using the results to determine if a corresponding batch is within allowable limits, you need to be confident that batches are a homogeneous blend of the barrels that go into them. Put another way, if your honey is properly homogenised, your tutin testing results should not be affected by testing at the batch or barrel level. You will need to make sure the honey sample is a true representative of total amount of honey you are processing.

 

You can find more information about the importance of taking representative samples of your honey on page 9 of the MPI tutin compliance guide http://www.mpi.govt.nz/dmsdocument/20489-compliance-guide-to-the-food-standard-tutin-in-honey-2016

 

Hope this helps.

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  • 2 weeks later...

With January being the start of the danger period for tutin we would love to hear from you about anything interesting you have observed. Perhaps you have tests results of interest you would like to share? In the East Coast region last season there were reports of a reading over 50mg/kg. That’s 70 times the permissible level and it comes from an area not normally considered high risk, demonstrating the need to be vigilant.

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Did you know that it is not just bees that periodically feed on passionvine hopper honeydew? Ants and wasps do as well. Here's an informative fact sheet on scolypopa australis put together by Landcare Research for those of you interested.

 

.http://nzacfactsheets.landcareresearch.co.nz/factsheet/InterestingInsects/Passion-vine-hopper---Scolypopa-australis.html

 

 

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13 minutes ago, John Russell said:

Have seen quite a bit of Tutu starting to flower in Northland while managing road side vegetation. Didn't see any bees collecting from it.

John  it seems you might need to read up on Tutu. Bees do not collect nectar from Tutu flowers. They harvest Passion Hopper excreta from Tutu stems.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Some images taken on the bank of the Tongariro river in Turangi this January. On the left you can see a passion vine hopper on a tutu bush – there were lots of bees foraging on other plants right next to this bush. River and stream banks like this are a very likely place to find tutu bushes and bees in close proximity!

MPI tutu bush photo 1 Feb 2018.jpg

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I really don't know where the bees get nectar from tutu flowers and if they do is not much but they definitely work the flowers for pollen. It can make up quite a high percentage of spring pollen. Bees can gather honeydew from blackberry and it is the same passion vine hopper. They can get over 20 kg in a good season and this year there has been a lot more round the normal. You would expect that there would also be more tutu honeydew but so far most test results I have heard about are considerably lower than last year. Koromiko can occasionally be toxic to brood. It's probably the pollen and it turns the gut of the pupa purple, in higher doses the whole pupa takes on a purple tinge and in extreme cases you get a very purple dead pupa. It is more of an interesting thing that happens than a serious problem but I do see it every few years. My brother and I named it purple death after a cheap wine that was available in our youth.

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On 3/1/2018 at 9:32 PM, john berry said:

I really don't know where the bees get nectar from tutu flowers and if they do is not much but they definitely work the flowers for pollen. It can make up quite a high percentage of spring pollen. Bees can gather honeydew from blackberry and it is the same passion vine hopper. They can get over 20 kg in a good season and this year there has been a lot more round the normal. You would expect that there would also be more tutu honeydew but so far most test results I have heard about are considerably lower than last year. Koromiko can occasionally be toxic to brood. It's probably the pollen and it turns the gut of the pupa purple, in higher doses the whole pupa takes on a purple tinge and in extreme cases you get a very purple dead pupa. It is more of an interesting thing that happens than a serious problem but I do see it every few years. My brother and I named it purple death after a cheap wine that was available in our youth.

That's a particularly alarming observation John when there are blanket recommendations of Hebe as being great for bees.  I have seen many Koromiko growing wild throughout the HB region and thought on the base of it it was a good thing.  Clearly it is a good thing to consider in bee management.  Despite a large amount of Tutu within a 5 km radius my Tutin results have been extremely positive but I have noticed that the nectar flow is on the decline and robbing is easy to incite when checking hives.  Perhaps the Tutu results of any honey harvested now will be a problem.  Despite seeing an early flow of honey dew in the Willows from what I determined was the GWA that has stopped.  I am wondering now if it was the GWA as I understand it is generally a problem from February/March when they start to have the biggest impact.   Wasps are a major problem and despite killing 8 nests I have the larger of the two patrolling the house from early morning to late at night.  More work to do on that one.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well folks its time for us to bring our participation in this thread to a close.Thanks for following and contributing to the discussion. We appreciate  your comments and feedback. We are still in the risk period for tutin and ask that you continue to be vigilant. This thread will remain open for you to continue discussions among yourselves. Remember you can also liaise with MPI directly through its Facebook page here. Wishing you all a good end to the season. Catch you next year.

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